using "regular" submersible well pump

Ethan BrushEthan Brush Solar Expert Posts: 231 ✭✭
Is anyone using a small (1/2 hp) mainstream market well pump? Do you have any amp draw vs psi numbers and/or thoughts on efficiency compared to say a shurflo 9300 or grundfos SQF?

My well is about 600 feet horizontally away, only about 10 feet of head, will want about 50 psi. Ill have the inverter to run it thats not an issue, just wondering to what degree it will be energy hog compared to an off grid pump. Its hard to swallow the price of an SQF or even a sureflo or aquatec that has marginal flow

Comments

  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Solar Expert Posts: 3,009 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    Hi Ethan, welcome to the forum.
    Couple of things, actually a few things - -
    Are you off grid?
    How much water will you need per 24 hour day, and if off grid, will you be using most of the water during daylight - - or at night?
    The off-the-shelf pump you are considering - - is it a submersible pump, or a jet pump? The submersible will certainly be more efficient by far than a jet pump, but will require it's electrical supply cable to stretch that 600 feet. If off grid, you'll need a solar supply at the well, or very heavy cables running the 600 feet, unless you use rather high transmission voltages. The off-the-shelf 1/2 hp submersible pump will have no trouble supplying that 50 PSI. In fact most all will supply 100 PSI or more, depending on the number of stages it has.
    A jet pump will do well to reach 60 or 80 PSI, at which point it's output will be reduced to a trickle. The horizontal run is not a real issue with a submersible pump, but could well cause damaging cavitation in a jet pump as it struggles to "suck" water through that long pipe. Both are centrifugal type pumps, so the more water they move, the more power they use. Higher pressure reduces water flow, so also slightly reduces power consumption, unlike positive displacement type pumps. The 1/2 hp submersible I used to have would fill a 45 gallon drum in about 6 minutes if there was no back pressure, and would supply about 4 times the flow of a jet pump when pumping against pressure.
    I'll let others speak to the SQ / Sureflo etc as I have no experience with those types. something you should not dismiss with due investigation and thought.
    Something else to consider - - given the relatively low prices these days of solar panels, you might be financially ahead to add a few more panels and go with off-the-shelf pump if power supply is an issue.
    Good luck and all the best.
  • Ethan BrushEthan Brush Solar Expert Posts: 231 ✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    Hi Ethan, welcome to the forum.
    Couple of things, actually a few things - -
    Are you off grid?
    How much water will you need per 24 hour day, and if off grid, will you be using most of the water during daylight - - or at night?
    The off-the-shelf pump you are considering - - is it a submersible pump, or a jet pump? The submersible will certainly be more efficient by far than a jet pump, but will require it's electrical supply cable to stretch that 600 feet. If off grid, you'll need a solar supply at the well, or very heavy cables running the 600 feet, unless you use rather high transmission voltages. The off-the-shelf 1/2 hp submersible pump will have no trouble supplying that 50 PSI. In fact most all will supply 100 PSI or more, depending on the number of stages it has.
    A jet pump will do well to reach 60 or 80 PSI, at which point it's output will be reduced to a trickle. The horizontal run is not a real issue with a submersible pump, but could well cause damaging cavitation in a jet pump as it struggles to "suck" water through that long pipe. Both are centrifugal type pumps, so the more water they move, the more power they use. Higher pressure reduces water flow, so also slightly reduces power consumption, unlike positive displacement type pumps. The 1/2 hp submersible I used to have would fill a 45 gallon drum in about 6 minutes if there was no back pressure, and would supply about 4 times the flow of a jet pump when pumping against pressure.
    I'll let others speak to the SQ / Sureflo etc as I have no experience with those types. something you should not dismiss with due investigation and thought.
    Something else to consider - - given the relatively low prices these days of solar panels, you might be financially ahead to add a few more panels and go with off-the-shelf pump if power supply is an issue.
    Good luck and all the best.

    Thanks for the Reply and info wayne. To answer your questions: yes I am off grid. I dont really know my water usage in gallons, but its probably not very much. Its just me and I dont do laundry or shower frequently and dont do any sort of watering of plants or livestock. I was considering a submersible pump. I currently have 6AWG aluminum cable installed. I maybe should have gone a little bigger but at the time I figured I would just use a 115 volt shurflo rv pump which only draws an amp. I am getting a little sick of their short lifespan however hence the rethink. But actually the 6 gauge isnt really bad as it will run a 120v 1/2 hp submersible with only a 6.5% Voltage drop, really not so bad. I think I can get a 1/2 240V version for even less transmission losses. The surflo 9300 is a 24V submersible and costs around $600. I would have about a 10% voltage drop running that. The problem with that is it has only 1.5 GPM at pressure and will need to be rebuilt regularly. at around $300 for a typical submersible well pump with all the flow I could ever want, long maintenance free life, and little line loss, its certainly tempting but concerned about amp hours per gallon being much higher than an off grid pump. No one seems to publish performance with electrical usage charts for these so its hard to compare.
  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Solar Expert Posts: 3,009 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    I tend to agree with you re reliability issues etc. One thing I forgot to mention - - if you do go with an off the shelf submersible, definitely get one with the separate "starter" control box. These pumps have 3 wires + ground, for a total of 4 wires between the motor and the surface mounted control box which receives it's power from the pressure switch. The other types have a built in starter, so only 2 wires + ground for a total of 3 wires between the motor and the pressure switch, and do not use the control box.
    Reason I'm saying this, the 2 wire motors having the built in starter have a much higher start surge and are thus much harder to start off grid.
    I'm assuming you live in an area where very cold temperatures are not a problem. Reason I mention this, the start capacitor in the control box can change value in extreme cold, making pump harder to start. If you're not in a cold location, the starter box can be located in a weather proof little "bird house" by the well, thus reducing wire use between the well and the house. You'll also need a check valve in the water line at the house to prevent pressure pulses/swings that may initiate rapid on/off switching of the pump. These oscillating pressure waves can be a serious problem with long pipe lengths such as yours, every time the pump stops. Assuming the pressure tank will be in the house at the far end of the 600 foot water line.
    You may also wonder the need of a ground wire to the surface when the motor is already well grounded by the water in the well. Actually it's to help protect the windings in the motor from lightening damage. In your case, use a surge protector between the supply wires and the "ground" wire that's connected to the outside metal shell of the motor. Excess voltage will hopefully then be directed to that ground wire and dissipated off the outside of the motor, rather than following the power wires and blasting out through the motor windings to earth.
  • mike95490mike95490 Solar Expert Posts: 9,046 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    I use a 1/2 standard well pump, for about 160' lift, gives me 70psi at the tap. (model in my .sig)

    It's going to take a beefy inverter to start it. Running, my inverter power readout, shows it's consuming about 1,000 watts. I know 1hp is about 740watts, but there are pump losses, power factor losses and some other things that contribute to a 1/2 hp motor drawing 1Kw.

    And be sure the motor can take being laid horizontal. Some of the bearing systems are not rated for that orientation. And make sure there is enough cooling water around the pump, that you don't ignore the water flow direction and burn the pump up. They make "flow inducer sleeves" for pumps to insure they stay cool, and also a well pump needs a torque arrester to keep it from spinning itself off the pipe.
    Powerfab top of pole PV mount | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
    || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
    || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

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  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Solar Expert Posts: 3,009 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    mike95490 wrote: »
    I use a 1/2 standard well pump, for about 160' lift, gives me 70psi at the tap. (model in my .sig)

    It's going to take a beefy inverter to start it. Running, my inverter power readout, shows it's consuming about 1,000 watts. I know 1hp is about 740watts, but there are pump losses, power factor losses and some other things that contribute to a 1/2 hp motor drawing 1Kw.
    Re the 1hp being roughly 740 watts - - - These pump motors are rated for their shaft hp, the hp they can actually deliver, (I know you and most others on this forum know that, but some do not) and since no electric motor is 100% efficient, of course it's power consumption is greater than it's power output. It's unfortunate that modern sales gimmicks have introduced so much confusion over traditional motor hp ratings by using electric power consumed, to inflate the real output power rating of motors. This hp inflation has become so rampant in motorized consumer products that it's often very difficult to grasp what hp a motor really can deliver. Seems truth in advertising in some cases at least, has gone right out the window. Two of the worst examples are air compressors and shop vacs intended for home use. It's amazing how (according to the adverts) some manufacturers and retailers can deliver products that are powered by motors which are 200%, 300% (or more) efficient when compared with the energy they consume. Is it any wonder some people believe they can build perpetual motion devices capable of lighting their homes with free electricity?
  • Ethan BrushEthan Brush Solar Expert Posts: 231 ✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    Thanks again for the advice guys. Mike, I was guessing it would use about 1000 watts so sounds like I was pretty close. Have you noticed how much the consumption changes as pressure builds? Consumption will certainly vary by load and fortunately I have very little head. IF you translate the holding tank pressure to head, Its about equivalent to 130 feet lift with no pressure.

    Regarding the HP claims, in addition to not being 100% efficient, HP is really an approximate number - it all comes down to heat and lifespan. But yes those shop vac claims are getting ridiculous. Some of them must be just about using the locked rotor current to calculate "HP"
  • jonrjonr Solar Expert Posts: 1,384 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    My well is about 600 feet horizontally away, only about 10 feet of head, will want about 50 psi

    If it's only 10 feet down to water, then you have other options. Like a 1/3 HP booster pump at the surface.

    I am available for custom hardware/firmware development

  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Solar Expert Posts: 3,009 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    Since these pumps are centrifugal, their power consumption actually drops somewhat as pressure builds. Not a great amount, but regardless, the consumption does drop as pressure increases. It's greatest power consumption, other than the start surge, will be when pumping at zero head, no back pressure, no restrictions.
  • tmarchtmarch Solar Expert Posts: 143 ✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    Is anyone using a small (1/2 hp) mainstream market well pump? Do you have any amp draw vs psi numbers and/or thoughts on efficiency compared to say a shurflo 9300 or grundfos SQF?

    My well is about 600 feet horizontally away, only about 10 feet of head, will want about 50 psi. Ill have the inverter to run it thats not an issue, just wondering to what degree it will be energy hog compared to an off grid pump. Its hard to swallow the price of an SQF or even a sureflo or aquatec that has marginal flow
    Do you have any storage for the water produced? If not a standard off grid pump won't work well without batteries for cloudy or night use, which is another consideration.
  • Texas WellmanTexas Wellman Solar Expert Posts: 153 ✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    Look for a Grundfos SQ pump. It runs on normal AC power (110 or 220V) but does not have a start-surge the way a normal pump has. It starts slowly. It's a 3" submersible pump and very friendly to inverters. You can buy one for the same price as the shur-flo.
  • jonrjonr Solar Expert Posts: 1,384 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    As Wayne suggests, if you are having problems with an inverter or generator starting a standard well pump - close the valve. But the difference can be large (like 30% less amps).

    I am available for custom hardware/firmware development

  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Solar Expert Posts: 3,009 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    jonr wrote: »
    As Wayne suggests, if you are having problems with an inverter or generator starting a standard well pump - close the valve. But the difference can be large (like 30% less amps).

    WOW, knew there would be a difference, but didn't realize it would be that large, never having properly measured it. Thanks for that.
  • AnawaAnawa Solar Expert Posts: 211 ✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    I am using a Grundfos SQF 11 installed 2 years ago. It operates directly off 5 Kyocera 225w panels and fills (2) 1500 gal tanks. Simple installation, extremely reliable, but on the pricey side. The pump is submersible, runs on either DC (directly off the panels) or AC. Slow start technology is great. My pump is horizontally 400' and down another 270'. Pump has dry run protection, although never been a problem at 11 gpm rated. The pump stops automatically with optional float valve in the tanks.
    Paul 
    in Georgia

    System 1: PV- 410w Evergreen, Mppt- Blue Sky Solar Boost, Batt - 225ah Deka AGM, 12v led house lighting,
    System 2: PV- 215w Kyocera, PWM - Morningstar PS30, Batt- 225ah Deka GC's, 12v led house lighting, Dankoff 12v water pump,
    System 3: PV- 1.5kw Kyocera, Grundfos 11 SQF well pump, 3000 gal above ground water storage, dom water & irrigation,
    System 4: PV- 6.1kw Kyocera, Mppt- Outback FM80-2ea, Inverter- Outback FX3648-2ea, Batt- 804ah GB traction, Grundfos BMQE booster pump 240v, Mitsibushi mini-splits 240v, 18k and 15k
  • vtmapsvtmaps Solar Expert Posts: 3,738 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    at the time I figured I would just use a 115 volt shurflo rv pump which only draws an amp. I am getting a little sick of their short lifespan however hence the rethink.

    You are onto to something... those 115 volt AC pumps don't last very long at all. The AC is rectified to about 160 volts DC, and the arcing eats up the negative brush in just a few hundred hours. However, the 12 volt models will last for years.
    more here: http://forum.solar-electric.com/showthread.php?22792

    --vtMaps
    4 X 235watt Samsung, Midnite ePanel, Outback VFX3524 FM60 & mate, 4 Interstate L16, trimetric, Honda eu2000i
  • Ethan BrushEthan Brush Solar Expert Posts: 231 ✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    vtmaps wrote: »
    You are onto to something... those 115 volt AC pumps don't last very long at all. The AC is rectified to about 160 volts DC, and the arcing eats up the negative brush in just a few hundred hours. However, the 12 volt models will last for years.
    more here: http://forum.solar-electric.com/showthread.php?22792

    --vtMaps

    Interesting. Mine is/was actually a flojet, but pretty much the same thing I imagine. I killed it by running it for several hours continuously cleaning up after a concrete pour. It was way too hot to touch.
  • Ethan BrushEthan Brush Solar Expert Posts: 231 ✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    Look for a Grundfos SQ pump. It runs on normal AC power (110 or 220V) but does not have a start-surge the way a normal pump has. It starts slowly. It's a 3" submersible pump and very friendly to inverters. You can buy one for the same price as the shur-flo.

    I spent the last few hours looking at the SQ. I think that is the way to go: good quality, more efficient than other consumer pumps, soft start, much cheaper than SQF. Ive spent half that on RV pumps already.
  • vtmapsvtmaps Solar Expert Posts: 3,738 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    Interesting. Mine is/was actually a flojet, but pretty much the same thing I imagine. I killed it by running it for several hours continuously cleaning up after a concrete pour. It was way too hot to touch.

    Those pumps are not rated to run continuously and the manufacturer is clear about that, IMO. Most of the manufacturers of these demand pumps make them in several grades, and Shurflo (maybe others?) sells large aluminum cooling fins that snap over the pump body. The heat production depends very much on the pressure generated by the pump. I've run these pumps for hours, pumping water 10 ft uphill to a storage tank (less than 5 psi at the pump), and the pumps stayed cool.
    I spent the last few hours looking at the SQ. I think that is the way to go: good quality, more efficient than other consumer pumps, soft start, much cheaper than SQF. Ive spent half that on RV pumps already.

    Nothing wrong with moving up to quality! But IMO, the reason to buy an SQ is because it is the right pump for the application, not because you've spent so much on pumps that were not suited to the application.

    To change the topic a bit, is there any chance you can generate some power (solar panels) down by the water source?

    If you can do that, you might save your SQ from lightning damage. The outer casing of the SQ is grounded to the well, and the wires inside the pump are grounded 600 ft away at the house. When lightning strikes in your neighborhood, the ground at your house and the ground at the well may be tens of thousands of volts apart. That differential ground potential will cause arcing between your pump wires and the pump housing.

    The solution, if possible, is to have no wires between the well and the house, i.e. generate your power at the well. If that's not possible, invest in some good surge protectors.

    --vtMaps
    4 X 235watt Samsung, Midnite ePanel, Outback VFX3524 FM60 & mate, 4 Interstate L16, trimetric, Honda eu2000i
  • jonrjonr Solar Expert Posts: 1,384 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    I use a Shurflo 115 VAC pump but I run it on ~80V (I use DC, the pump doesn't care) and I have the cooling fins. It runs 8 hours every day, but no doubt that the brushes will eventually fail. So I'm actively looking for a low cost, low flow, long life pump, preferably > 24V (less amps so smaller wire needed).

    I am available for custom hardware/firmware development

  • Ethan BrushEthan Brush Solar Expert Posts: 231 ✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    vtmaps wrote: »
    Those pumps are not rated to run continuously and the manufacturer is clear about that, IMO. Most of the manufacturers of these demand pumps make them in several grades, and Shurflo (maybe others?) sells large aluminum cooling fins that snap over the pump body. The heat production depends very much on the pressure generated by the pump. I've run these pumps for hours, pumping water 10 ft uphill to a storage tank (less than 5 psi at the pump), and the pumps stayed cool.



    Nothing wrong with moving up to quality! But IMO, the reason to buy an SQ is because it is the right pump for the application, not because you've spent so much on pumps that were not suited to the application.

    To change the topic a bit, is there any chance you can generate some power (solar panels) down by the water source?

    If you can do that, you might save your SQ from lightning damage. The outer casing of the SQ is grounded to the well, and the wires inside the pump are grounded 600 ft away at the house. When lightning strikes in your neighborhood, the ground at your house and the ground at the well may be tens of thousands of volts apart. That differential ground potential will cause arcing between your pump wires and the pump housing.

    The solution, if possible, is to have no wires between the well and the house, i.e. generate your power at the well. If that's not possible, invest in some good surge protectors.

    HMM, I appreciate the concern and recommendation but to be blunt I dont buy it :) I have never heard of anyone having a pump failure due to that scenario and its rural around here so everyone and their brother has a well pump hundreds of feet from the house. I am not quite sure what you mean by the "wires inside the pump that are grounded 600 feet away." Yes a pump supplied from a grounded system and fed with a grounded conductor and an ungrounded conductor (120v pump) would meet that criteria, but a 240 pump would not, nor would any pump fed from an ungrounded system ( I will likely not have a grounded electrical system since they have little purpose in an off grid system).

    Bringing some science into the discussion, electrical energy dissipates quite rapidly where it touches the ground forming circular "shells" of potential difference (and of course "man made" electricity it returning to its source via the ground, not disappearing into the depths of the earth). As an example of this, its why utility substations have an equipotential grid under the station. If there is a high voltage fault, there can literally by thousands of volts difference of potential between each foot of a worker as the current dissipates (returns to its source) into the earth. If there is no equipotential grid, you can be in trouble. Say are you running an excavator and hit a high voltage line. The safest thing to do is stay on the machine until the line can be de-energized, however if you must leave due to say fire, you should hop away with both feet together therefore minimizing the risk of being exposed to a dangerous difference of potential.

    Lighting is one of those things I dont worry too much about. Its rare to have a problem and if it wants to, it can still give you a problem no matter how many steps you take to prepare for it.
  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Solar Expert Posts: 3,009 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    HMM, I appreciate the concern and recommendation but to be blunt I dont buy it :) I have never heard of anyone having a pump failure due to that scenario and its rural around here so everyone and their brother has a well pump hundreds of feet from the house. I am not quite sure what you mean by the "wires inside the pump that are grounded 600 feet away." Yes a pump supplied from a grounded system and fed with a grounded conductor and an ungrounded conductor (120v pump) would meet that criteria, but a 240 pump would not, nor would any pump fed from an ungrounded system ( I will likely not have a grounded electrical system since they have little purpose in an off grid system).

    Bringing some science into the discussion, electrical energy dissipates quite rapidly where it touches the ground forming circular "shells" of potential difference (and of course "man made" electricity it returning to its source via the ground, not disappearing into the depths of the earth). As an example of this, its why utility substations have an equipotential grid under the station. If there is a high voltage fault, there can literally by thousands of volts difference of potential between each foot of a worker as the current dissipates (returns to its source) into the earth. If there is no equipotential grid, you can be in trouble. Say are you running an excavator and hit a high voltage line. The safest thing to do is stay on the machine until the line can be de-energized, however if you must leave due to say fire, you should hop away with both feet together therefore minimizing the risk of being exposed to a dangerous difference of potential.

    Lighting is one of those things I dont worry too much about. Its rare to have a problem and if it wants to, it can still give you a problem no matter how many steps you take to prepare for it.

    Seems you totally misunderstood what vtmaps was trying to explain. But I'll leave it at that other than to say you and vtmaps appear to be on totally different wavelengths, and he does know that of which he speaks. It might help to go back and carefully re-read his post, INCLUDING the quotes he included of things you had posted previously. #18
  • Ethan BrushEthan Brush Solar Expert Posts: 231 ✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    Seems you totally misunderstood what vtmaps was trying to explain. But I'll leave it at that other than to say you and vtmaps appear to be on totally different wavelengths, and he does know that of which he speaks. It might help to go back and carefully re-read his post, INCLUDING the quotes he included of things you had posted previously. #18

    I reread the posts and I still dont see it, nor do I think we are on totally different wavelengths :) Perhaps he can elaborate or clarify, I certainly may be misunderstanding or missing something and I am certainly not always right, however be warned this is my field and I am a grounding and bonding theory and code nut ;) The way I am following the logic, the same argument could apply to ANY electrically interconnected structures that have some separation between them, and thus every utility supplied structure. If lightning strikes the ground very close to the pump, it will likely be damaged regardless of the arrangement of the supply and grounding/bonding conductors. The equipment grounding conductor run with the supply conductors of the pump (NEC 250.110) is also required to be bonded to the well casing (250.112(M)) and this is to provide a low impedance bath back to the source to clear a fault just like any other piece of equipment and is not for lightning protection.
  • icarusicarus Solar Expert Posts: 5,400 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    Coming late tot he party, but, the Surflo submersible, running on 24 vdc is a pretty good, reliable pump. That said, 600' from the building is no issue for the pump, but if you are running 600' of wire it isn't going to work. A simple solution is to put he PV near the pump and move the water not the power, like a small stand alone system. You could also add a larger storeage tank such that you time shift your pumping loads to daylight hours, requiring a smaller battery bank.

    Tony
  • Ethan BrushEthan Brush Solar Expert Posts: 231 ✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump
    icarus wrote: »
    Coming late tot he party, but, the Surflo submersible, running on 24 vdc is a pretty good, reliable pump. That said, 600' from the building is no issue for the pump, but if you are running 600' of wire it isn't going to work. A simple solution is to put he PV near the pump and move the water not the power, like a small stand alone system. You could also add a larger storeage tank such that you time shift your pumping loads to daylight hours, requiring a smaller battery bank.

    Tony

    That pump would almost work. The VD is about 9% - not abysmal, but not great of course. I could put the pump in the basement which is at the same level as the water. I doubt the 600 feet of friction losses would be a Problem. I dont really want the pump in the house though, those things are loud and resonate through the pipe quite a ways. More importantly though, the flow is just a little too marginal. Im sick of having marginal pressure and volume when I need it. A real pump really shouldnt be a power or energy issue after the system upgrade, I think its time.
  • icarusicarus Solar Expert Posts: 5,400 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: using "regular" submersible well pump

    With snot storage volume (pressure tank) volume and pressure is not an issue. As for the 9300 submersible, the noise is very slight, nd y can mitigate it by putting in a coil loop on the input side of the tank.

    Tony
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