jonr ✭✭✭✭

> a larger battery jar...all that extra water Say one uses SG 1.220 vs 1.265.   That's an unnoticeably 4% larger battery jar to get the same amount of sulfur.

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jonr
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  • > a larger battery jar...all that extra water

    Say one uses SG 1.220 vs 1.265.   That's an unnoticeably 4% larger battery jar to get the same amount of sulfur.

    ·
    August 30
  • Niki
    I agree the lower SG is better due to less corrosion of plates & grids less self discharge etc.  problem is a certain amount of Sulphur is needed and a weaker solution requires a larger battery jar for more water.  In auto batteries they try to pack as much energy in the electrolyte as possible at the expense of battery life and efficiency.  Industrial stationary flooded wet cells are made to last up to 20 years and in temperate climates can have fully charged.S G as low as 1.220. they just have an oversized jar to accommodate all that extra water.  I once removed a set of Exide Manchex batteries from a coal fired power plant that were over 30 years old and still had decent capacity.  They had a specific gravity of 1.210!  I took them to my off grid cabin and used them for another 6 or 7 years.  They were so old the jars were real glass not clear plastic.
    Niki
    ·
    August 30