Running .050 gauge chain with factory preset of .043?

softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
This should make sense to experienced chain saw users. http://www.madsens1.com/bnc_pitch_gauge.htm

.043 is light weight and helps a weaker saw turn the chain at a higher speed. But .043 is also weaker, harder to find, and a bit more expensive. 

I'm considering using shorter bars for cleaning the limbs off of felled trees. .043 offers very limited options - I like options. Right tool for the job etc.

The chain and bar must match of course. I've been researching this a bit.


First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries

Comments

  • mike95490mike95490 Solar Expert Posts: 9,099 ✭✭✭✭✭
    my wife just got herself one of the small Makita electric chain saws, good for pruning up to 7", and has much better power than I  thought it would
    Powerfab top of pole PV mount | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
    || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
    || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

    solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
    gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister ,

  • softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
    mike95490 said:
    my wife just got herself one of the small Makita electric chain saws, good for pruning up to 7", and has much better power than I  thought it would
    People are surprised by the power of the battery operated offered by Makita, DeWalt and Milwaukee. Though I don't see how they would be content with the longevity of a 4 or 5 aH battery.

    I have two acres of burned trees to clear. A 12 aH battery seems to last less than 1/2 hour of 50/50 operation. Good thing about being a tool junkie? I have two 12's and and two 9's to entertain me for quite a bit of cutting. 

    But I doubt a large percentage ever need more than a couple 4 or 5 aH batteries for their tree work. As for me, I'm getting a back up Milwaukee since things are built in a "fragile manner" - since the 60's really. 

    The gas operated tend to be an exercise in frustration in these days of ethanol crap that clogs their carb jets. My service guy worked so hard on the ethanol problems that his doc just ordered him to close his shop. Silver lining? I get my diesel genset back after all. Just 450 miles of driving to get it in time. 

    FWIW - Makita has a low voltage cut off on their batteries - which helps longevity - quite significantly I would think.

    DeWalt uses a 12" bar and one standard battery.
    Makita uses a 14" bar and two standard batteries - for 36V. 
    Milwaukee uses a 16" and a mondo 12 aH battery. But I am going to use a 14" bar on one of them - for one handed operations.  
    First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries
  • New_Mexico_WillNew_Mexico_Will Registered Users Posts: 86 ✭✭
    I have a Stihl MS660, a Farm Boss 390, and an old 044.  I also have a 48 volt Greenworks 12".  I cut about 12 cords a year.  The Greenworks surprised me with its power, but the battery dies quickly.  

    Gains in power are very noticeable when switching to shorter bars, but not so much when playing with tooth gauge/pitch.  Just my experience.  Your mileage may vary.
  • 706jim706jim Solar Expert Posts: 382 ✭✭✭✭
    My gas weed eater died. So I borrowed my brother's battery powered unit. I was brushing a trail about a half mile long. While this weed eater worked pretty well, when it died, I had to walk a considerable distance to recharge it. And wait 40 minutes for this to complete. Head back out again and the same thing happens. So while I will concede that electric powered weed eaters and chainsaws do a creditable job, I have concluded that they are at their best only when close to a charging station and when you have that sort of recovery time to waste.

    so....

    Bought a gas powered Stihl weed eater.
    Island cottage solar system with 2400 watts of panels, 1kw facing southeast 1kw facing southwest 400watt ancient Arco's facing south.Trace DR1524 MSW inverter, Outback Flexmax 80 MPPT charge controller 8 Trojan L16's. Insignia 11.5 cubic foot electric fridge. My 27th year.
  • softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
    At 9000', gas engines suffer in performance - another thing to consider I suppose. The walk to swap batteries takes time and energy. Perhaps the break is useful at times. 
    First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries
  • New_Mexico_WillNew_Mexico_Will Registered Users Posts: 86 ✭✭
    You can re-jet your carbs for your altitude for better performance at that altitude.
  • BB.BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 31,182 admin
    I got a Makita electric chain saw like this one:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Makita-16-in-18-Volt-X2-36-Volt-LXT-Lithium-Ion-Brushless-Cordless-Chain-Saw-Kit-5-0Ah-XCU04PT/303718088

    With 4x batteries total... One pair on charge while using the other pair. Seems to work OK so far (fast charger, batteries are about fully charged when first set need recharging). The only confusion--The forward "handle" is a kick back "brake" (at least for gasoline saws). For the electric saws, it turns off the battery power--The handle does not move much, and if accidently turned off--Your chain saw looks "dead" until you remember to pull the "brake" handle back to turn the saw on again.

    I have a Mac 3200 chains saw I inherited from my dad... for 30+ years, worked great--Have not used it for a long time, put new fuel in and started up/ran like a champ. Then a few days later, went to start again, and nothing. Took it apart, and found that all the plastic fuel lines turned to dust (literally). I guess from the alcohol/additives in today's fuels.

    I needed a saw right away, and got the electric one (the lithium battery tools seem to be doing OK for me--NiCad batteries went bad in storage and light usage after a couple years for me). And eventually, I will replace the fuel hoses (and primer bulb) that, hopefully, will last with the current fuel. But tool batteries are scary expensive (~$100 per battery--Made me think real hard about why I was passing on a gas chain saw instead for about 1/2 the price vs the Makita +4x batteries).

    Nice to run the electric saw. And if I was out in the middle of nowhere, would need a small genset or inverter to charge the batteries for any major cutting.

    If you are over 5,000 feet, typically need to re-jet carburettors to keep from running rich.. But with proper jetting, at ~7,000 Feet, you are still running at a maximum of 75% of sea level power...

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
    Two acres of burned trees is a mondo chore! Found my enthusiasm waning today. A huge tree managed to bend the 24" chainsaw bar as it crashed to the ground. Guess I am still learning things. Thinking I need heavy duty leather chaps as well. Pretty sure a chainsaw would cut through flesh like butter. 

    Ethanol is government sponsored crap and a destroyer of so many previously great fuel systems from 20 plus years ago. It isn't even good for the environment in the big picture. It mostly just destroys fuel systems and lowers performance and gas mileage. Of course a select few have gotten rich from it. BB - do you perhaps know of a DC rich cat named Mr. Plunkey?  For every loser there is a partial winner. 
    First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries
  • softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
    Turns out these "kevlar" logging chaps will stop gas chain saws! A worthy investment I think. My work pants stopped a mild chain scrape today. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B017TKJBXK/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries
  • softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
    BB. said:
    I got a Makita electric chain saw like this one:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Makita-16-in-18-Volt-X2-36-Volt-LXT-Lithium-Ion-Brushless-Cordless-Chain-Saw-Kit-5-0Ah-XCU04PT/303718088

    With 4x batteries total... One pair on charge while using the other pair. Seems to work OK so far (fast charger, batteries are about fully charged when first set need recharging). The only confusion--The forward "handle" is a kick back "brake" (at least for gasoline saws). For the electric saws, it turns off the battery power--The handle does not move much, and if accidently turned off--Your chain saw looks "dead" until you remember to pull the "brake" handle back to turn the saw on again.

    I have a Mac 3200 chains saw I inherited from my dad... for 30+ years, worked great--Have not used it for a long time, put new fuel in and started up/ran like a champ. Then a few days later, went to start again, and nothing. Took it apart, and found that all the plastic fuel lines turned to dust (literally). I guess from the alcohol/additives in today's fuels.

    I needed a saw right away, and got the electric one (the lithium battery tools seem to be doing OK for me--NiCad batteries went bad in storage and light usage after a couple years for me). And eventually, I will replace the fuel hoses (and primer bulb) that, hopefully, will last with the current fuel. But tool batteries are scary expensive (~$100 per battery--Made me think real hard about why I was passing on a gas chain saw instead for about 1/2 the price vs the Makita +4x batteries).

    Nice to run the electric saw. And if I was out in the middle of nowhere, would need a small genset or inverter to charge the batteries for any major cutting.

    If you are over 5,000 feet, typically need to re-jet carburettors to keep from running rich.. But with proper jetting, at ~7,000 Feet, you are still running at a maximum of 75% of sea level power...

    -Bill
    You should be able to run Milwaukee and DeWalt batteries on a Makita with this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07MF2VJMT/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 

    Got mine today - seems to work well. I love Makita tools and Milwaukee 9 and 12 aH batteries. I'm ready for a break when a 12 aH battery needs a recharge.

    I'm also getting ready to start repacking my own batteries. Just needs a spot welder and you know how to make your own.
    First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries
  • softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
    I feel that .043 on a 16" gets tossed far too easily and is a bit spindly. Looking forward to trying .050 on a 14" chain. Got some yesterday. 
    First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries
  • softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
    Installed the  new 14" Oregon .050 bar today. At first the chain was not getting oiled - a major problem. Installed the Milwaukee 16" bar and it oiled like crazy. Re-installed the Oregon and the oiling function worked fine. Another odd occurrence in a life that see"s far too many. 
    First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries
  • softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
    Awesome choice. The saw is easier to handle with 14". The blade is far less spindly and the chain is 1/4 as likely to pop off. The batteries seem to last at least as long as well. Perhaps a skosh longer but I didn't test that equation. 

    I recommend ditching the 16" .043 bar and chain and using a 14" ,050 bar and chain. All day long. After wearing out the 16" chain of course. It isn't all that bad. 

    Using an Oregon 3/8" .050 bar and compatible chain. Bars and chains MUST match. 
    First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries
  • softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
    Still not a one handed operation with 14". Going to get a 12" as well. Small is beautiful. 
    First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries
  • mike95490mike95490 Solar Expert Posts: 9,099 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The chain pitch (space between links) must match the saw's drive sprocket. 
    Powerfab top of pole PV mount | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
    || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
    || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

    solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
    gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister ,

  • softdownsoftdown Solar Expert Posts: 3,494 ✭✭✭✭
    mike95490 said:
    The chain pitch (space between links) must match the saw's drive sprocket. 
    That goes without saying. Almost everything is 3/8" these days. A few .404s in the huge saws used in the PNW. Some old saws using what have you. I have not seen anything but 3/8" for my 1/2 dozen saws - up to 32" bars. 
    First Bank:16 180 watt Grape Solar with  FM80 controller and 3648 Inverter....Fullriver 8D AGM solar batteries. Second Bank/MacGyver Special: 10 165(?) watt BP Solar with Renogy MPPT 40A controller/ and Xantrex C-35 PWM controller/ and Morningstar PWM controller...Cotek 24V PSW inverter....forklift and diesel locomotive batteries
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