Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

Coach DadCoach Dad ✭✭Solar Expert Posts: 154 ✭✭
Is it possible to use the Energy Star label for “accurately” determining loads. I’m aware that nothing beats an Kill-A-Watt meter but it isn’t practical to try and hook up to refrigerators on the showroom at Home Depot for 24 hours to get a daily number.

I’m referring to the estimated yearly electricity usage not the estimated operating cost.

I’m wondering if the Energy Star is accurate or is it just a reference point like the EPA Estimate MPG on a car (which is never accurate).

Is it safe to say that I can extrapolate the daily electricity consumption of an Energy Star Refrigerator simply by dividing the “Estimated Yearly Electricity Use” by 365 days?

For example using this label
Attachment not found.

It would be 383kWh/365 = 1.055kWh/day

Is this correct or should I throw in some extra %'s for real life usage?

I’m considering replacing my Propane Refrigerator with an Electric and want to make sure I’m doing the right thing.
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Comments

  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    My area is pretty temperate--So, I find that the refrigerator/freezer labels are pretty accurate. The test is supposed to be done at 90F and have door openings during the period (but no ice making?).

    However, if you, for example, make a lot of ice, over pack the refrigerator/freezer (poor air circulation), get dust on the condenser (pet hair), etc., the usage can go up quite a bit (20% or more).

    And, as the appliance ages and gets near end or life/need service (repairing leak, etc.) it can use more power... My guess is worse case is around 2x label (at that point, the compressor is usually running near 100% of the time).

    If you wanted a fudge factor, I would use 1/0.75 (1.33x) the tag.

    And then there is the occasional mfg. that "plays games" with the testing. One vendor turned of the "anti sweat" door edge heaters when the ambient hit 90F (just at the Energy Start Test temperature--what a coincidence).

    My limited experience...

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • Coach DadCoach Dad ✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 154 ✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    Hi Bill - Thanks for the reply.

    So at by them testing it at 90F and multiplying by 365 days to get the yearly estimate, they pretty much give you the worst case scenario.
    In real life the refrigerator is seeing 90F only once in a blue moon.
    When it is cold outside you are running your heat to keep the house at 65-70 degrees.
    When it is real hot outside you are running the A/C to keep the house comfortable...

    So based on that thinking, I would expect to use LESS than the label most of the time (when it is new),,,, Correct?
  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    Mine were a little bit less than the tag when new (yeah, around 70F or a bit cooler most of the year for us). When they got got over filled and excess plastic bags from store, usage did go up over the label by a good amount--like 25% or more (somebody in our family cannot resist a good sale on food items :roll:).

    However, for "fixed" loads, you should probably not plan on running them to more than 60-75% of your "predicted" daily average system availability--Unless you are able to cut back on optional loads (scheduling washes, irrigation, etc.) and/or you are OK with using the generator a bit more.

    You can monitor your system and always look into adding a bit more solar panels later--if needed.

    -Bill

    PS: I do have a couple of pretty new "cheap" fridge and deep freezer (vertical)--I can run a kill-a-watt meter on both for 24 hours each--if you want (not sure I want to know the "real" power usage :p). They are both in an outdoor shaded/insulated shed--runs around 65-70F pretty much all year round.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • Coach DadCoach Dad ✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 154 ✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    BB. wrote: »
    PS: I do have a couple of pretty new "cheap" fridge and deep freezer (vertical)--I can run a kill-a-watt meter on both for 24 hours each--if you want (not sure I want to know the "real" power usage :p). They are both in an outdoor shaded/insulated shed--runs around 65-70F pretty much all year round.

    -Bill

    Thanks Bill... This would be a good test if you still have the Energy Star labels on them.:D
    I would love to see the results.

    I ran my kill-a-watt on the refrigerators that I have a home... but they are older and don't have the Energy Star labels on them.
    My 19cf side by side uses 1.9kw/day My newer 25cf uses 1.7kw/day
  • inetdoginetdog ✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 3,123 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    Coach Dad wrote: »
    I ran my kill-a-watt on the refrigerators that I have a home... but they are older and don't have the Energy Star labels on them.
    My 19cf side by side uses 1.9kw/day My newer 25cf uses 1.7kw/day
    For both older and newer models, there are some things which you can control which affect power consumption strongly.
    1. Door gasket heaters. Unless you need them (objectionable condensation on the metal), turn them off.
    2. Automatic defrost. Generally you cannot and do not want to turn this off, but the length of time the defrost heater stays on will be related to the amount of ice that has to melt off.
    By keeping the door closed and the gaskets in good condition, as well as covering wet foods in the fridge and freezers, you can reduce the amount of time spent defrosting, at least on newer models that do not use just a fixed length time cycle.
    SMA SB 3000, old BP panels.
  • nielniel ✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 10,311 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    how would one know if there is a door gasket heater?
  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    I have heard that some refrigerators have a "summer" switch (turns on the heater in hot/humid weather to stop condensation).

    None of my refrigerator/freezers have ever had such a switch (that I have ever seen).

    Some refrigerators now run the "hot side" output of the compressor around the door frame to heat it (for "free").

    Presumably, metal cabinet right were the magnet gasket contacts will either be cool/cold (no heater) or warm (heater).

    From here, some rules of thumbs:

    http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/2908/2908-9022/2908-9022.html
    Freezers
    Whether or not to own a separate freezer should be based on an evaluation of your needs. The energy efficiency of a freezer depends on the size and type of freezer. To qualify for the ENERGY STAR label, freezers with a volume of 7.75 cubic feet or greater must be at least 10 percent more efficient than the federal standard.

    A chest freezer generally uses 10 to 25 percent less energy than an upright model because it is better insulated and cold air does not spill out when the door is opened. Manual defrost models consume 35 to 40 percent less energy than comparable automatic defrost ones. However, because ice build*up can significantly decrease the efficiency of the freezer, you will need to defrost periodically to ensure that there is never more than a quarter inch of ice (the maximum thickness recommended for the freezer to keep operating efficiently).

    Refrigerator and Freezer Purchasing Tips

    1. Consider buying a top-mount refrigerator-freezer. Top-mount refrigerator-freezer models use 10 to 25 percent less energy than side-by-side models.
    2. Consider a model without an ice-maker and dispenser. Automatic ice-makers and through-the-door dispensers increase energy use by 14 to 20 percent and raise the purchase price by about $75-250.
    3. Look for a refrigerator with automatic moisture control, but without an anti-sweat heater. Models with automatic moisture control have been engineered to prevent moisture accumulation on the cabinet exterior without the addition of a heater. This feature differs from an “anti-sweat” heater that actually produces heat. Models with an anti-sweat heater will consume 5 to 10 percent more energy than models without this feature.
    4. Consider a model with manual defrost. Manual defrost models consume 35 to 40 percent less energy than comparable automatic defrost models.

    -Bill

    PS: Had a manual defrost upright freezer for the last ~7 years... Worked fine and used a bit less than the tag said--However, was a huge pain in the butt to defrost. And because it was always overloaded and had no circulation fans, the front door shelves were almost refrigerator temperature.
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • nielniel ✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 10,311 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    ok thanks bill as i never saw that on a refrig yet, but i looked at lower end refrigs. my new one only has 1 temp control for both refrig and freezer parts and i don't think it has the ability to vary the airflow with a vent control like my old one did. pay more, get less, typical these days.
  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    OK, here is the first refrigerator... A Jenn-Air (aka Maytag) JFC 2087HRS (20 cuft freezer on bottom, no ice in door, ice maker broken, probably getting old and close to needing replacement (why I tossed it on the kill-a-watt meter about two months ago--figured it was running too much). Condenser is clean, sort of close to being over filled again:

    1,209 hours = 50.375 days
    124 kWH over 1,209 hours
    124 kWH / 50.375 days = 2.46 kWH per day

    Average temperature of kitchen is pretty much around 65-70F.

    I think the Energy Star tag was in the range of ~450 kWH per year or 1.2 kWH per day (pretty sure it was less than 500 kWH per year).

    Going to test a less than one year old frost free fridge and a few month old frost free freezer next couple of days

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • Coach DadCoach Dad ✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 154 ✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    BB. wrote: »
    Refrigerator and Freezer Purchasing Tips

    1.Consider buying a top-mount refrigerator-freezer. Top-mount refrigerator-freezer models use 10 to 25 percent less energy than side-by-side models.
    2.Consider a model without an ice-maker and dispenser. Automatic ice-makers and through-the-door dispensers increase energy use by 14 to 20 percent and raise the purchase price by about $75-250.
    3.Look for a refrigerator with automatic moisture control, but without an anti-sweat heater. Models with automatic moisture control have been engineered to prevent moisture accumulation on the cabinet exterior without the addition of a heater. This feature differs from an “anti-sweat” heater that actually produces heat. Models with an anti-sweat heater will consume 5 to 10 percent more energy than models without this feature.
    4.Consider a model with manual defrost. Manual defrost models consume 35 to 40 percent less energy than comparable automatic defrost models.

    I went looking at new refrigerators last night... The guy at Lowes told me he hasn't seen any with manual defrost.
  • solar_davesolar_dave ✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 2,344 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    We bought a new Whirlpool french door about 18 months ago, nice fridge except that recently it builds up ice in the bottom of the freezer unit and when the defrost cycle hits the water leaks out onto the SWMBO new wood floor. I have been directed to get a service call into to somebody to solve the problem. We already had a problem with the electronics blowing up on it to the tune of $400 (about 30 days out of warranty), I am starting to speculate that maybe that repair was less than stellar.

    Something tells me that this fridge is not long for this house. I dread the purchase of a new one. I do like buying American but this one has left a bad taste.
  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    To get a "simple" upright frost free freezer (~16 cuft) -- I had to order it (Home Depot). Been looking for refrigerator without ice/water through the door, and there is not much out there right now (we need a "counter depth" unit) that have good reviews (fair number seem to have a lot of service calls and problems that cannot be fixed).

    Not a big fan of extended warranties--But may be appropriate here. Also, many credit cards are supposed to add up to 1 year on warranties if you use the card. Have not tried to collect on a CC warranty yet--But may be worth a try.

    The appliances with "all the options" are common on the sales floor. The "simple" ones with no nice/water through the door, getting harder to find.

    Hardwood floors in kitchen/under fridge can be difficult. My in-laws fridge/freezer was (and is) working well after many decades, however the water filter was an "inline" unit at the rear of the fridge. They do not use much ice or cold water, and the old filter (never changed) got a very fine leak while they were on vacation. I noticed it while watering their plants after a few days and there was a huge amount of water under the wood floor and in the dinning room carpets. Using a shop vac, a couple fans, running the house heat, and getting a dehumidifier, I was able to get all the water out before it caused any obvious damage over a couple of days.

    I had an environmental chamber at work that did something similar (deionized water filter for humidity control sprung a leak over a three day weekend). Next work day found "Lake Magnetics" -- I really ticked off a lot of software engineers vacuuming up the water--But I did talk with my (future) wife during the clean up (she was one of the ticked off software engineers :roll:).

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    BB. wrote: »
    OK, here is the first refrigerator... A Jenn-Air (aka Maytag) JFC 2087HRS (20 cuft freezer on bottom, no ice in door, ice maker broken, probably getting old and close to needing replacement (why I tossed it on the kill-a-watt meter about two months ago--figured it was running too much). Condenser is clean, sort of close to being over filled again:

    1,209 hours = 50.375 days
    124 kWH over 1,209 hours
    124 kWH / 50.375 days = 2.46 kWH per day

    Average temperature of kitchen is pretty much around 65-70F.

    I think the Energy Star tag was in the range of ~450 kWH per year or 1.2 kWH per day (pretty sure it was less than 500 kWH per day).

    Going to test a less than one year old frost free fridge and a few month old frost free freezer next couple of days

    -Bill

    Next one is a GE GTH18EBC2RWW
    0.72 kWH over 23.39 hours:
    0.72 kWH * 1/23.39 hours * 24 hours per day = 0.74 kWH per day or 270 kWH per year.

    Shed was 70F today.

    Refrigerator is a 18 cuft top freezer [energy star data says 20 cuft--wrong?], no ice maker/water (cheap guy for back shed), not opened very often. No warm food added during 24 hour period. Fridge set cold, freezer running around +10F to -10F. Fridge in relatively open area against wall next to freezer (measuring its usage over next 24 hours).

    Rated at 311 kWH per year (per current Energy Star pdf download).

    270/311 = 0.87 = 87% of energy star label.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • Volvo FarmerVolvo Farmer ✭✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 209 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    That refrigerator is definitely not 20.8 cubic feet, it is 18.1 cubic feet. However, it is the most efficient 18CF refrigerator I have ever seen offered in the US market from the big box stores. According to the GE website, it is no longer being manufactured, which is a real shame for watt misers like me!
  • Volvo FarmerVolvo Farmer ✭✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 209 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    solar_dave wrote: »
    We bought a new Whirlpool french door about 18 months ago, nice fridge except that recently it builds up ice in the bottom of the freezer unit and when the defrost cycle hits the water leaks out onto the SWMBO new wood floor. I have been directed to get a service call into to somebody to solve the problem. We already had a problem with the electronics blowing up on it to the tune of $400 (about 30 days out of warranty), I am starting to speculate that maybe that repair was less than stellar.

    The drain tube for the defrost water is likely plugged up, perhaps with ice. If you're willing to remove the lower drawer and peek back at the trough under the evaporator, you might be able to clear the drain yourself and avoid a service call. A steamer like is bought for cleaning works well, but I have also used a zoom spout oil container that has been cleaned and filled with hot water to melt the ice out of the drain tube.
  • solar_davesolar_dave ✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 2,344 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    The drain tube for the defrost water is likely plugged up, perhaps with ice. If you're willing to remove the lower drawer and peek back at the trough under the evaporator, you might be able to clear the drain yourself and avoid a service call. A steamer like is bought for cleaning works well, but I have also used a zoom spout oil container that has been cleaned and filled with hot water to melt the ice out of the drain tube.

    Thanks for the tip. I have been down on my hands and knees and don't see a drain hole but I will look again. BTW I found that strange as well.
  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    That refrigerator is definitely not 20.8 cubic feet, it is 18.1 cubic feet. However, it is the most efficient 18CF refrigerator I have ever seen offered in the US market from the big box stores. According to the GE website, it is no longer being manufactured, which is a real shame for watt misers like me!

    I have updated to 18 cuft... You are probably correct and the energy star data is wrong.

    Already out of production? To bad--We looked for a utilitarian refrigerator that used little power.

    Here is the E.S. Tag with 311 kWH and 18.1 cuft. rating:

    Attachment not found.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • Volvo FarmerVolvo Farmer ✭✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 209 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    solar_dave wrote: »
    Thanks for the tip. I have been down on my hands and knees and don't see a drain hole but I will look again. BTW I found that strange as well.

    Try this:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVBkMsXsn_4
  • inetdoginetdog ✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 3,123 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    solar_dave wrote: »
    ... recently it builds up ice in the bottom of the freezer unit and when the defrost cycle hits the water leaks out onto the SWMBO new wood floor.
    The freezer should be cooled by circulating cold air and the ice will build up on the evaporator coil usually located under the freezer somewhere and out of sight inside the air duct. The drain will be below that coil, not in the bottom of the compartment.
    That ice is building up on the bottom tells me that there is no air circulation and/or the ice on the evaporator has gotten so thick that it is touching the bottom of the freezer compartment.
    That would explain condensation inside the compartment freezing on the bottom. Or something (like the ice maker) is leaking water inside where it is not expected to be and that is why there is ice in the bottom. See whether turning off the water valve for ice maker helps.

    Try moving your food and letting the freezer defrost completely, with doors open, for 6 or more hours and see whether you see a lot of water dripping into the evaporation pan eventually. You may have to be in position to drain the evaporation pan because you will be overwhelming it with more water at a time than it can handle.

    First step is move the unit out from the wall so you can get at the back.
    SMA SB 3000, old BP panels.
  • solar_davesolar_dave ✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 2,344 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    inetdog wrote: »
    The freezer should be cooled by circulating cold air and the ice will build up on the evaporator coil usually located under the freezer somewhere and out of sight inside the air duct. The drain will be below that coil, not in the bottom of the compartment.
    That ice is building up on the bottom tells me that there is no air circulation and/or the ice on the evaporator has gotten so thick that it is touching the bottom of the freezer compartment.
    That would explain condensation inside the compartment freezing on the bottom. Or something (like the ice maker) is leaking water inside where it is not expected to be and that is why there is ice in the bottom. See whether turning off the water valve for ice maker helps.

    Try moving your food and letting the freezer defrost completely, with doors open, for 6 or more hours and see whether you see a lot of water dripping into the evaporation pan eventually. You may have to be in position to drain the evaporation pan because you will be overwhelming it with more water at a time than it can handle.

    First step is move the unit out from the wall so you can get at the back.

    The ice maker is actually in the refrigerator compartment for in the door ice, we see no water in that compartment.
  • solar_davesolar_dave ✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 2,344 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label



    I bet that is it sans icemaker
  • Volvo FarmerVolvo Farmer ✭✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 209 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    inetdog wrote: »
    That ice is building up on the bottom tells me that there is no air circulation and/or the ice on the evaporator has gotten so thick that it is touching the bottom of the freezer compartment. That would explain condensation inside the compartment freezing on the bottom.

    My guess is has nothing to do with air circulation or ice build up on the evaporator. The drain hole freezes and the water from each defrost cycle cannot exit through the hole, so it builds an ice sheet on the bottom and drips out the front.
  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    OK, got my last set of readings for a Whirlpool 20 cuft upright frost free freezer:

    whirlpool ev201nztq basic model (no water) upright frost free freezer. In ~70F shed with free air curculation around sides. Probably only opened about 5 times in the last 48 hours. Set for 0F to -10F. Pretty full, but not over full.

    Energy Star Rated 671 kWH per year:

    http://www.whirlpool.com/kitchen-1/refrigeration-2/freezers-3/-%5BEV201NZTQ%5D-1001292/EV201NZTQ/

    3.95 kWH over 47.39 hours = 2 kWH per day = 730 kWH per year

    730 / 671 = 1.09 = ~9% more power than tag.

    -Bill
    BB. wrote: »
    OK, here is the first refrigerator... A Jenn-Air (aka Maytag) JFC 2087HRS (20 cuft freezer on bottom, no ice in door, ice maker broken, probably getting old and close to needing replacement (why I tossed it on the kill-a-watt meter about two months ago--figured it was running too much). Condenser is clean, sort of close to being over filled again:

    1,209 hours = 50.375 days
    124 kWH over 1,209 hours
    124 kWH / 50.375 days = 2.46 kWH per day

    Average temperature of kitchen is pretty much around 65-70F.

    I think the Energy Star tag was in the range of ~450 kWH per year or 1.2 kWH per day (pretty sure it was less than 500 kWH per day).

    Going to test a less than one year old frost free fridge and a few month old frost free freezer next couple of days

    -Bill

    Next one is a GE GTH18EBC2RWW
    0.72 kWH over 23.39 hours:
    0.72 kWH * 1/23.39 hours * 24 hours per day = 0.74 kWH per day or 270 kWH per year.

    Shed was 70F today.

    Refrigerator is a 18 cuft top freezer [energy star data says 20 cuft--wrong?], no ice maker/water (cheap guy for back shed), not opened very often. No warm food added during 24 hour period. Fridge set cold, freezer running around +10F to -10F. Fridge in relatively open area against wall next to freezer (measuring its usage over next 24 hours).

    Rated at 311 kWH per year (per current Energy Star pdf download).

    270/311 = 0.87 = 87% of energy star label.
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • Coach DadCoach Dad ✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 154 ✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    Hi Bill - Thanks for your testing.
    I'm going to go with the Frigidaire 18.2FT3 that has a 381KWh/year energy star label.
    Consumer Reports ranked it well too. If it uses 1050Wh/day I should be ok.
    Thanks again
  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    Do your research on Frigidaire and their feedback... In the recent past (10 years or so), their quality was very poor and places like Home Depot stopped carrying them (and we were burned by a couple of the entry level ~14-18 cuft units that only lasted a couple of years before they stopped cooling).

    I see that Frigidaire is making a big push (including back at Home Depot)--So it is possible they have addressed their quality problems.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • Volvo FarmerVolvo Farmer ✭✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 209 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    BB. wrote: »
    Do your research on Frigidaire and their feedback... In the recent past (10 years or so), their quality was very poor and places like Home Depot stopped carrying them (and we were burned by a couple of the entry level ~14-18 cuft units that only lasted a couple of years before they stopped cooling).

    I see that Frigidaire is making a big push (including back at Home Depot)--So it is possible they have addressed their quality problems.

    -Bill

    I have been repairing appliances for my living since 1991. First of all, I disagree with the premise that anyone who makes the decisions at Home Depot about which appliances to carry on the showroom floor cares one whit about whether or not they puke after one or two years. I routinely see all kinds of engineering nightmares on the showroom floor when I peruse the Appliance section. Second of all, I see very few Frigidaire refrigerators needing repair that are of the basic configuration like the OP is considering buying. They are a dead simple design, all analog controls and they very rarely lose the refrigerant charge because of a breach in the sealed system. What was the diagnosis when your units stopped cooling?
  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    Don't know. Slowly the compessor ran longer and longer and eventually the freezer would defrost.

    Happened to two different units after about 2-3 years. Lots of online complaints about the same thing happening.

    Low end units not worth fixing. As we were looking for replacement, other Customer in the store with same problems.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • inetdoginetdog ✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 3,123 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label
    BB. wrote: »
    Don't know. Slowly the compessor ran longer and longer and eventually the freeze would defrost.

    Happened to two different units after about 2-3 years. Lots of online complaints about the same thing happening.

    Low end units not worth fixing. As we were looking for replacement, other Customer in the store with same problems.
    From the symptoms, that would either be slow loss of refrigerant or slow buildup of leakage from high to low pressure side in the condenser seals from wear. (Forgot to include lubricant in the fluid cargo?). Both expensive to fix and with loss of refrigerant no guarantee that they could find the leak.
    SMA SB 3000, old BP panels.
  • BB.BB. admin Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 29,628 admin
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    Yep--Two or three refrigerators in a period of less than 5 years failed from new (small apartment building). Comments at the time (and even today with other brands/models)--Still seems to be a pretty common complaint (stops cooling after a couple years and costs too much to fix).

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • Lee DodgeLee Dodge ✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 112 ✭✭
    Re: Daily Load Estimate from Energy Star label

    I have a Whirlpool Corp. 18.9 cu. ft. refrigerator/freezer, Model WR9XXMFW*0*, top-mounted freezer, automatic defrost, without thru-the-door ice service or automatic ice maker. The Energy Star rating is 343 kWh annually (840 Wh/day). Measurements with a Kill-a-Watt meter agreed to this rating within 1 or 2 percent. I live in a relatively cool, dry climate (Colorado mountains). The unit was purchased in 2010. The last Whirlpool refrig./freezer that I had worked fine for 20 years and was still working when I sold it with the house.

    I do not have the background or experience to recommend that brand over any other. I often rely on previous experience, Consumer Reports, and on-line reviews before making a choice.
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