Pool pump

Hello All,
Am new to the forum and to solar power. I have an above ground pool it has a Hayward power-flo matrix pump 1.5 HP,115 volts,15 amps, 60Hz,3450 rpm. I am in Atlanta GA. and have full sun on the pool all day. (No trees or obstructions). I run the pump 6 to 8 hours a day. What do I need to solar power the pump? Would I need batteries? Thanks

Comments

  • mike95490mike95490 Solar Expert Posts: 9,583 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Pool pump

    So your pump ends up consuming 1,800 watts. That's pretty steep! To run the pump directly will need about 2.5 or 3KW of solar panels. That's a real steep investment.

    Any chance you can get by with a smaller pump, or is your pool so huge, that you need 1.5 HP to run the filter ? Any thoughts of maybe using silver, ozone, or salt chemistrys to keep it clean ?

    If you wanted to ONLY run this pump, off solar, you could either purchase a DC motor for it, and hardwire it to the solar panels, or maybe a better bet would be to install a "Grid-Tie" system, that just feeds power into the grid while the sun shines. No batteries, just panels, and a special grid tie inverter. You then run the pump as usual, but there is no backup capacity if the power goes off.
    Powerfab top of pole PV mount | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
    || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
    || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

    solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
    gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister ,

  • Solar GuppySolar Guppy Solar Expert Posts: 1,989 ✭✭✭
    Re: Pool pump

    A 3/4 HP will do the job just fine and run you about 400 dollars to replace the pump/filter unit. If you change to using a cartridge system, I would think something in the 3/8 - 1/2 HP would be more than adequate for an above ground pool. Just keep in mind, you need to also change the physical pump. The reason is the pump is fixed HP work load based on the RPM of the motor. If you just change the motor, it will still require the old HP and will draw the same amount of electricity, overloading the smaller motor

    As for solar, it would cost you about 3X the electrical khw rate over 30 years your paying now to use solar, best case.

    I have an inground pool, about 7500 gallons that also has solar thermal, in pool vac and has zero issues with the flow rate, even with pushing the water thru the solar thermal collects on the roof. Pools pumps for some odd reason are always oversized and there is no technical reason for this.
  • System2System2 Posts: 6,290 admin
    Re: Pool pump

    Thanks for the quick replies. The pool is 17,200 gals. and the pump is the one they installed with it. I have found DC pump kits for pools but they were in the 3,000.00 to 6,000.00 dollar range I was hoping to do it my self for alot less.
  • BB.BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 32,804 admin
    Re: Pool pump

    You best bet is to approach the problem from several directions...

    First, replace the pump and related components with as energy efficient parts as possible (still 120/240 VAC). Also, install solar heating too. That will save you energy/money.

    Next, if you still want solar PV panels for electricity (and your utility allows Grid Tied systems, and your local building codes permit it too), install a Grid Tied solar system. Basically, a bunch of solar panels, connected to a Grid Tied Inverter (DC panels to 240 VAC 60 Hz inverter), which is then wired into your breaker panel. This is the the most energy for the dollar. You won't have backup capabilities (no batteries), but you will have the most efficient power collection and no battery costs (and battery replacement costs ever 5-10 years).

    In virtually any solar electric installation, conservation is always the place you first want to spend your money. It is much cheaper to conserve than to generate power (a basic Grid Tied solar system is going to cost somewhere around $0.25 per kWhr--without rebates--areas with poor sun, and/or with battery backup/off grid systems will cost much more--probably closer to $1.00 per kWhr--by the way, the cost numbers are very approximate to give you an idea of how costs compare). Currently, most people pay much less than that for their electric power.

    In some parts of the country (like New York and California), especially for those with high monthly power usage (over ~1,000 kWhrs per month), we can pay upwards of $0.35 per kWhr (my maximum time of use rate is $0.50 per kWhr during summer afternoons). So, for some people, installing enough solar to shave peak rates can make cost savings even with a retail/no rebate install.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • mike95490mike95490 Solar Expert Posts: 9,583 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Pool pump
    Batman77 wrote: »
    I am in Atlanta GA. and have full sun on the pool all day.

    If Atlanta has "Time Of Use" metering, you can also put a timer on your pump, and have it OFF in the afternoons, when the rate is the highest.

    If you install solar water heating, switching to a smaller pump for those times, will save money, and then switch on the large pump, when rates are low.
    Powerfab top of pole PV mount | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
    || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
    || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

    solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
    gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister ,

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