Need help deciding on inverter for proposed system

DaveyclimberDaveyclimber Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭
I'm currently looking at a couple different inverters. I'm looking for split phase operation and have narrowed my current choices to either 2 SMA Sunny Island 6048 or 1 Growatt 12000T with 250V dual PV input. I am buying components for my near future build and have bought so far 12 Hanwha Q cells G6+ 350 watt panels and 6 EG4 100Ah batteries with TOP mounts. I'm interested in buying 6 more panels if possible. I'm in western Montana and we have little sunshine in the winter so I want to limit running my generator as much as possible.

I like the idea of the Sunny Islands but think it may be over complicating my install by having to have separate charge controllers and wiring up 2 inverters if I'm understanding correctly. It would be a bonus if I were not doing split phase. If one unit went down I'd still have some capability but since two unit are needed for split phase I would be sol anyway.

The Growatt seems very interesting as I could possibly use the integrated mppt and not have to buy additional controllers. Availability seems scarce as it appears to be a newer offering. Price is attractive.

Am I missing something? My 12 (possible 18) current panels are rated VOC 40.73 V , VMPP 34.07 V , ISC 10.79 A , IMPP 10.27 A. Lowest temp around -10F

Between building a home and trying to figure out my solar power system my brain is at full capacity. Thank you for your input and knowledge.

Comments

  • BB.BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 32,019 admin
    Welcome to the forum Daveyclimber,

    Solar power is pretty expensive... I throw out $1 - $2+ per kWH--Or somewhere around 5-10x the cost of utility power (at least in "sane" states). Even a simple gasoline genset runs around $1+ per kWH just based on fuel costs... And at least 1/2 or more of your costs over the next 5-10 years is paid up front (hardware, batteries, labor, etc.).

    Do you have any "reasonable" access to utility power (i.e., $10-20k for running power to your property will still be less than solar power).

    Do you have any idea of how much energy you use per day/per month yet (such as an existing home)? Energy usage is a highly personal set of choices and it would be difficult to come up with a "number" (kWH per month, Watt*Hours per day, by season) that would be accurate for you and your family.

    Be that as it may... I can at least give you some ideas:
    • 1,000 WH per day (30,000 WH or 30 kWH per month)--A cabin with LED lighting, RV water pump, laptop, and cell charger
    • 3,300 WH per day (100,000 WH or 100 kWH per month)--Suggested minimum size system to aim for a for a very efficient off grid cabin/home (LED lighting, full size refrigerator, solar friendly well pump, clothes washer, laptop, LED TV, propane/other fuels for heating/hot water/cooking) and lots of conservation
    • 10,000 WH per day (300 kWH per month)--A "normal" home with some heavier electric loads (some electric cooking, kids with laptops, central heat/propane or oil for heat)...
    • 500 kWH per month--"average" north American home with natural gas/propane/etc..
    • 1,000 kWH per month--"high average) north American home with some electric heat/AC not much conservation
    • 3,000 kWH per month--Electric home in Texas with lots of AC 
    With your system as described... I am guessing that you are in the 10,000 WH / 300 kWH per month range (at least). So, lets do some back of the envelope math and see what happens.

    Guesses: 10,000 WH per day, somewhere around Missoula MT. You already have some solar panels--But I am going to ignore them for now. Solar panels are about the cheapest part of the system these days--And mixing/matching older and newer panels can be a pain and add confusion at this point in the design cycle. I will just "size" the system first--Showing my work so you can modify as you see fit for your needs.

    10,000 WH per day... Assuming flooded cell lead acid batteries for first pass (Li Ion batteries are very nice, but expensive and need to be >40F to charge/discharge without damage). 2 days of storage (no sun) and 50% maximum planned discharge (for better battery life):
    • 10,000 WH per day * 1/0.85 AC inverter eff * 2 days storage * 1/0.50 max discharge * 1/48 volt battery bank = 980 AH @ 48 volt battery bank
    Using rules of thumb here to get a reasonably sized/priced system that will work. Nothing set in stone. Just to give you a feeling for the battery bank--That is roughly 8x 6 volt golf cart batteries in series times 5 parallel strings of 200 AH GC battery strings in parallel--Or ~40 GC batteries... Not saying to use these batteries--Just to indicate that this is not a small bank. There are other choices like 2 volt cells that are 1,040 AH or larger... 24 of these x $500 each from Rolls (note from supplier, Rolls is 26 week delivery for these batteries):

    https://www.solar-electric.com/rolls-surrette-s2-l16-ex-flooded-deep-cycle-battery.html

    Now sizing the solar array... 5% rate of charge (20 hour rate/battery capacity) can work for sunny/summer systems. 10% to 13% is a good rate of charge for a full time off grid system. And in some cases (such as yours in poor winter sun), 20%-25% rate of charge may make sense:
    • 980 AH battery bank * 58.0 volts charging * 1/0.77 solar panel+controller deratings * 0.05 rate of charge = 3,691 Watt array minimum
    • 980 AH battery bank * 58.0 volts charging * 1/0.77 solar panel+controller deratings * 0.10 rate of charge = 7,382 Watt array nominal
    • 980 AH battery bank * 58.0 volts charging * 1/0.77 solar panel+controller deratings * 0.13 rate of charge = 9,596 Watt array "typical" cost effective maximum
    • 980 AH battery bank * 58.0 volts charging * 1/0.77 solar panel+controller deratings * 0.20 rate of charge = 14,764 Watt array "really big"
    For a full time off grid system, 10% minimum rate of charge highly recommended (unless you plan on lots of genset runtime and fuel).

    And sizing the solar array based on WH per day and hours of sun by month... Using a fixed array facing south around Missoula Mt:
    http://www.solarelectricityhandbook.com/solar-irradiance.html

    Missoula
    Average Solar Insolation figures

    Measured in kWh/m2/day onto a solar panel set at a 43° angle from vertical:
    (For best year-round performance)

    JanFebMarAprMayJun
    2.66
     
    3.75
     
    4.71
     
    5.12
     
    5.13
     
    5.41
     
    JulAugSepOctNovDec
    6.11
     
    5.90
     
    5.20
     
    3.93
     
    2.86
     
    2.37
     

    There are lots of options for arrays... Tracking, arrays tilted much more vertical in winter to catch more sun and shed snow, facing 1/2 array South West and other 1/2 facing South East (more hours of harvest per day--Much better for FLA batteries)--But the above is close enough to continue sizing the system.

    Lets say, 2.37 Hours of sun per day (December long term average)--And just accept the fact you will be running your generator during bad weather/heavy power usage:
    • 10,000 WH per day * 1/0.52 off grid system eff * 1/2.37 hours of sun per day (Dec) = 8,114 Watt array December "break even"
    There is the concept of needing to power "base loads" such as refrigerator, lighting, well pump, any business equipment (computers, printers, networks, etc.)... Highly suggest that those base loads only plan on using 65% to 50% of "predicted loads"... Of that 10,000 WH per day, what percentage is "base loads" vs "optional loads" (vacuuming, clothes washing, working in shop, etc.) that can be put off until sunny weather (or run genset)...
    • 10,000 WH daily load * 0.65 "base load fudge factor" = 6,500 WH per day for "base loads"
    • 10,000 WH daily load * 0.50 "base load fudge factor" = 5,000 WH per day for "base loads" using different factor
    Now--What would the above system "power"... For a flooded cell lead acid battery bank (FLA), highly suggest that maximum AC inverter (and typical max size solar array) be 1,000 Watts per 100 AH @ 48 volt battery bank:
    • 980 AH (at 48 volts) * 1,000 Watts * 1/100 AH = 9,800 Watt max AC inverter load for this bank
    • 9,800 Watt peak / 2 = 4,900 Watt minimum "useful" AC inverter
    So--The range of suggested inverters for this bank would be from 4,900 to 9,800 Watts (and a "max" useful array of 9,800 Watts--Although, low amounts of winter sun suggest a larger array may still be useful in Winter). Typical off grid/hybrid AC inverters will supply 2x (or more) of rated loads for seconds to minutes (start well pump, power tools).

    And there is sizing the genset. Typically suggest running a good quality genset at 80% of rated power (battery banks can take 5+ hours of max charging current for a depleted bank--Running genset at 100% of rated power for hours on end--Not usually a good idea). Battery chargers can run from 80% to 95% efficient (lots of "details" behind this number too)... Pick 80% to be conservative at the moment:
    • 980 AH battery * 10% rate of charge = 98 Amps
    • 980 AH battery * 20% rate of charge = 196 Amps charging
    • 98 Amps * 59 volts charging * 1/0.80 genset derating * 1/0.80 charger derating = 9,034 Watt genset minimum 10% rate of charge
    • 196 Amps * 59 volts charging * 1/0.80 genset derating * 1/0.80 charger derating = 18,069 Watt genset maximum 20% rate of charge
    The above numbers are for charging only... Some chargers have programmable max charging current/generator draw (generator support function)... Which can be pretty neat... You get a "small" 10% rate of charge genset, the inverter-charger will draw max programmed current from genset--And (for example) if a well pump starts, the inverter-charger will reduce charging current to avoid overloading the genset--Or even help with supplying extra battery bank power to start/run short term heavy load(s).

    At this point--This is not a small system. Finding a supplier and/or installer to help select hardware/install/program/configure and provide ongoing support and any warranty issues--Probably a good idea.

    In some cases--You can provide the labor (racking for arrays, wiring to power shed, genset pad and installation, etc.) to help keep costs down and learn more about your system and the ongoing maintenance/support work you can do.

    Until you have sized your loads/energy needs--Picking hardware vendors is not suggested at this point (pick a vendor or two for pricing/planning)--Don't buy any more hardware until you have done all of the paper design and finalized the configuration. Many times getting stuff "on sale" or from friends--You can end up with compatibility issues between major components.

    Just to give you an idea of what average energy usage can look like... Say you need 5 hours in the evening from your off grid system (cooking, kids doing homework, you cleaning up the books, etc.):
    • 10,000 WH per day / 5 hours per evening = 2,000 Watt average load for those 5 hours per evening
    The fridge may take 120 Watts for 30 minutes of every hour. And 500 Watts for an hour per day to defrost.

    A 1.5 HP well pump may need a >4,000 Watt inverter to reliably start. Or you can get a "solar friendly" well pump that will take 1,000 Watts (starting & running--And some that will run directly from their own solar array with genset/AC/DC backup). And even "slow pump" water into a cistern, and a smaller/simple pump to pressurize the house.

    Not saying that your system has to be "this small"--There are some very large/impressive systems out there. But these are not DIY type systems. And even then, the "wrong" electrical/systems engineer has been known to muck a system design up. Check references.

    Example of "extreme off grid":

    What "can be done":
    https://forum.solar-electric.com/discussion/19312/extreme-off-grid

    What "can go wrong" with large/complex off grid power system:
    https://forum.solar-electric.com/discussion/17986/is-the-system-set-up-right/p1

    And why to do things "right":
    Panel Fire Question

    We do have a FAQ thread--Just lots of random thoughts and projects you might want to look through:

    https://forum.solar-electric.com/discussion/4426/working-thread-for-solar-beginner-post-faq

    Your thoughts?

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • DaveyclimberDaveyclimber Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭
    Thank you so much for your insight. I will be trying to digest all your info. I am about 2 hours west of Missoula. Not alot of sun in the winter months. I'm trying to build the system around the winter months. Yes panels are nearly the cheapest part of the equation. My 2 racks cost more than my panels. 10,000Wh per day is my dart against the board calculation. Been in a travel trailer for 2 years, so I have forgotten what living with abundant electricity is like. Currently building a home. No chance of utility power for my subdivision. I have my deposit on batteries already, a little over 30Kwh worth. Already ha e a couple of diesel generators on hand to pick from. 2,  7.5kw and 1,  12kw. I will be doing all the installation most likely.and have a decent grasp on what's involved. My weak area is knowing what is compatible when it comes to inverters, charge controllers and the BMS for my batteries. So much new stuff on the market but not alot of long term reviews regarding it. I like the idea of the growatt and the SI because there is substance. The fact they both weigh well over 100lbs tells me there is some beefy old school technology built in. Alot of the new inverters weigh half as much for the same rating. That worries me and the fact the companies marketing them are relatively new, who knows if they will be around for support in a couple years. Thanks again for your input.
  • wellbuiltwellbuilt Solar Expert Posts: 687 ✭✭✭✭
    Off grid in Montana , I would go with a real off grid system , the all in one systems do look easy to install .
      Sunny island seams like good equipment but I would look at snider or outback they cost more but you pay once 
       And cry once .
    I have a outback system  and it works sweet , my system is 4 years old , if I was buying now I would be looking hard at snider . 
      You can get a  snider or a out back radian prebuilt system that you can just hook up to your solar panels and your house service . I like this one in the pic 
     out back builds the complete  system 
     I have  25 Q cell 295 watt  15 are hooked up now .
      In poor weather I get about 250watts day in no matter what , as long as they are not covered with snow . 
      Double up on panels and I’ll get 450 /500watts more  it’s enough to run my Daly needs and on a bright day I can get 2000watts for a good part of the day . 
     Now with good sun at noon in December I get 2000 watts or a little more . 
     In July I get 3700 watts  or a little more , this time of year I’m only charging with 3 strings of 3 panels 
       Or I would be charged up before brunch 
    Out back  flex power one  with out back 3648 inverter fm80 charge controler  flex net  mate 16 gc215 battery’s 4425 Watts solar .
  • wellbuiltwellbuilt Solar Expert Posts: 687 ✭✭✭✭
     This seams like a lot of power for a house it will surge to 16000 watts
     I have a 36/48 flex power one . Most of the time I’m using 200/300 watts day in day out .
    Out back  flex power one  with out back 3648 inverter fm80 charge controler  flex net  mate 16 gc215 battery’s 4425 Watts solar .
  • BB.BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 32,019 admin
    I think Wellbuilt intended "Schneider" as a system/mfg to look at. An example (from our host NAWS):

    https://www.solar-electric.com/schneider-electric-xw-pro-6848-21-inverter.html

    One reason to pick all equipment from one mfg (be it Schneider/Outback/whomever) is integrated networking. If you are into numbers and/or remote access/system control (via Internet/smartphone/etc.) it can be nice to have it all from the same vendor.

    Look at warranties... For example the XW Pro has 5 years and and additional 5 year option to purchase (in California, if you get state credits, they state requires 10 year warranty).

    Other things... Look at how long product is in market/end of production date (estimated/scheduled). For most electronics, it get difficult to impossible to get parts/service past 5 years after end of life.

    Also, look for the "new features" available on newer designs... The big one I would look at these days is Lithium Ion support (usually Off Grid system "talks with" the Li Ion Battery Management System). You may not do it now--But 5-8 years down the road, may be very interesting option (note: Li Ion batteries function "best" if >40F -- Below freezing, they generally cannot be cycled--So have to be kept "warm" in sub freezing climates).

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • DaveyclimberDaveyclimber Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭
    Will be powering a shop as well. The 120v side and lower usage 240v. Larger 240v equipment will be operated by generator.
  • PhotowhitPhotowhit Solar Expert Posts: 5,658 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Will be powering a shop as well. The 120v side and lower usage 240v. Larger 240v equipment will be operated by generator.

    Be sure to try to run the shop as an 'opportunity load' in the afternoons when the system moves into float mode. 

    Most off grid setups are very wasteful, they must be to reach fully charged a couple times a week in poor weather, So most sunny weeks/days you will find the system/battery bank fully charged by noon or 1. Running loads during these times is pretty much 'free' as the energy would just be wasted.
    Home system 4000 watt (Evergreen) array standing, with 2 Midnite Classic Lites,  Midnite E-panel, Magnum MS4024, Prosine 1800(now backup) and Exeltech 1100(former backup...lol), 660 ah 24v Forklift battery(now 10 years old). Off grid for 20 years (if I include 8 months on a bicycle).
    - Assorted other systems, pieces and to many panels in the closet to not do more projects.
  • Dave AngeliniDave Angelini Solar Expert Posts: 6,033 ✭✭✭✭✭
    A networked power system is a game changer. hard to ever go back. The one below is an XW power system from a smartphone anywhere in the world. It does not need the internet. It is 6.8KW continuous, 8.5 KW for 30 minutes and 12KW for 5 minutes. It will start extremely difficult 240vac loads and even gives you the weather along with more charts and graphs than anyone offgrid wants. It will close loop charge and 10 years is a nice warranty, also worldwide now I was told.


    "we go where power lines don't" Sierra Mountains near Mariposa/Yosemite CA
     http://members.sti.net/offgridsolar/
    E-mail [email protected]

  • DaveyclimberDaveyclimber Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭
    Because of sporadic short intervals of good sun on the property I plan on having 3 arrays in a rough 90 degree arc, south, southeast and west. Trees on adjacent forest service land block all eastern morning sun. I have looked at Schneider and limited peeks at the outback radians. Seems most like them alot until there is an issue that requires tech support. Either their installers drops off the face of the earth or the user gets the run around by tech support if they can even get a response. There would be no way that I'd rely on having a unit installed by a company based 2-3 hours away. Good luck getting timely field service. Nothing is timely in Montana at the present which is why I'm grudgingly building my own home and infrastructure. I've posted this thread on a few different sites and this site is providing the most help so far. Thank you everyone. Keep it coming.
  • DaveyclimberDaveyclimber Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭
    edited July 14 #11
    BB. said:
    I think Wellbuilt intended "Schneider" as a system/mfg to look at. An example (from our host NAWS):

    https://www.solar-electric.com/schneider-electric-xw-pro-6848-21-inverter.html

    One reason to pick all equipment from one mfg (be it Schneider/Outback/whomever) is integrated networking. If you are into numbers and/or remote access/system control (via Internet/smartphone/etc.) it can be nice to have it all from the same vendor.

    Look at warranties... For example the XW Pro has 5 years and and additional 5 year option to purchase (in California, if you get state credits, they state requires 10 year warranty).

    Other things... Look at how long product is in market/end of production date (estimated/scheduled). For most electronics, it get difficult to impossible to get parts/service past 5 years after end of life.

    Also, look for the "new features" available on newer designs... The big one I would look at these days is Lithium Ion support (usually Off Grid system "talks with" the Li Ion Battery Management System). You may not do it now--But 5-8 years down the road, may be very interesting option (note: Li Ion batteries function "best" if >40F -- Below freezing, they generally cannot be cycled--So have to be kept "warm" in sub freezing climates).

    -Bill
    Yes, currently building a power room to store all power generation equipment. Will be well insulated, propane heat to keep the batteries above freezing.
  • Dave AngeliniDave Angelini Solar Expert Posts: 6,033 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Because of sporadic short intervals of good sun on the property I plan on having 3 arrays in a rough 90 degree arc, south, southeast and west. Trees on adjacent forest service land block all eastern morning sun. I have looked at Schneider and limited peeks at the outback radians. Seems most like them alot until there is an issue that requires tech support. Either their installers drops off the face of the earth or the user gets the run around by tech support if they can even get a response. There would be no way that I'd rely on having a unit installed by a company based 2-3 hours away. Good luck getting timely field service. Nothing is timely in Montana at the present which is why I'm grudgingly building my own home and infrastructure. I've posted this thread on a few different sites and this site is providing the most help so far. Thank you everyone. Keep it coming.


    If you are offgrid, you really need to know it all and not expect a large company to do more than supply the manuals, videos and warranty. That is why you should take your time and learn before you buy equipment. You could live on a genset and a small bank while you get up to speed for a year.

    The Radian and XW rarely need support. I have them running over 15 years now. It is just a power system. If you are going to hire somebody to do this, you still need to understand it all and be there offgrid. Short of that, there are plenty that come to this forum and often get fires put out. Some fires are too large and have burned too long.   Good Luck!
    "we go where power lines don't" Sierra Mountains near Mariposa/Yosemite CA
     http://members.sti.net/offgridsolar/
    E-mail [email protected]

  • wellbuiltwellbuilt Solar Expert Posts: 687 ✭✭✭✭
    Here is my utility room when I just got the inverter fired up .
    my battery’s where moved to the right into the garage in a insulated box
     I made the  wire race way in a buddys shop 
     and  of course There is a cover .
     I have a second fm80 to the right of the one in the pic on a custom mounting panel 
     I have a water pump ,pump tank pex hot and cold  distribution block Radiant floor heat system  propane fire hot water heater And 250 gallon water tank .  The room is 6x11’  
    Out back  flex power one  with out back 3648 inverter fm80 charge controler  flex net  mate 16 gc215 battery’s 4425 Watts solar .
  • DaveyclimberDaveyclimber Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭
    Wellbuilt, what are you using to heat your fluid for radiant heat?
  • wellbuiltwellbuilt Solar Expert Posts: 687 ✭✭✭✭
    I bought my out back flex power one from the store here , the guys where very good .
    after having endless Conversations with bb ,Photowhit, Dave Mike ,Rick and a dozen other guys I 
    called the store here and told the guys what I wanted to do and in about 12 hours or so I had I itemized quote with all the materials I would need except wire and pipe . 
     The main reason I went with out back is that I can call the store and get real help from any one that answers the phone 
       If I have more technical question I can get a Engineer on the phone that actual knows what he is doing .
     The guys helped me program my mate with me reading the screens to him and the guys here are very good also lots of help .
     Some of the out back staff sits in on there form and will jump in and help .
      My neighbor has a out back system that has been     running for almost 20 years  with nothing done to it but new l16 battery’s and a new charge controller . 
      My system was very easy to set up and just makes power im not very good with  electric’s but I’m learning as I go
     
    Out back  flex power one  with out back 3648 inverter fm80 charge controler  flex net  mate 16 gc215 battery’s 4425 Watts solar .
  • DaveyclimberDaveyclimber Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭
    Because of sporadic short intervals of good sun on the property I plan on having 3 arrays in a rough 90 degree arc, south, southeast and west. Trees on adjacent forest service land block all eastern morning sun. I have looked at Schneider and limited peeks at the outback radians. Seems most like them alot until there is an issue that requires tech support. Either their installers drops off the face of the earth or the user gets the run around by tech support if they can even get a response. There would be no way that I'd rely on having a unit installed by a company based 2-3 hours away. Good luck getting timely field service. Nothing is timely in Montana at the present which is why I'm grudgingly building my own home and infrastructure. I've posted this thread on a few different sites and this site is providing the most help so far. Thank you everyone. Keep it coming.


    If you are offgrid, you really need to know it all and not expect a large company to do more than supply the manuals, videos and warranty. That is why you should take your time and learn before you buy equipment. You could live on a genset and a small bank while you get up to speed for a year.

    The Radian and XW rarely need support. I have them running over 15 years now. It is just a power system. If you are going to hire somebody to do this, you still need to understand it all and be there offgrid. Short of that, there are plenty that come to this forum and often get fires put out. Some fires are too large and have burned too long.   Good Luck!
    Yes, I have learned much over the past year or better. I have a pretty good idea on projected power usage from my past utility supplied home. I'm not trying to be an energy hog and we can be quite conservative as evidenced by living off grid in a travel trailer with a dinky eu1000i and a NOCO charger for 2 years. The pre-wired systems look nice, compact and organized. I figured if I have to know the ins and outs of the whole system since I will not be able to rely on a dealer then why not just build the system myself? I already own most of the tooling and hardware and wire and cable. But ultimately I need a reliable systems, especially the component side of it. 
  • SurfpathSurfpath Solar Expert Posts: 439 ✭✭✭
    Hi Davey 
    i have a similar integrated Outback system as Wellbuilt, 9 years now. My system has only been briefly offline twice, both because of minor human errors (mine). The tech folks at Outback still helped me even though the system is well past warrantee.
    I also appreciated hat it was pre wired. Like you I was building a house at the same time and was so dang grateful to only have to hang the unit and plug in the batteries and panels.

    While the Outback manuals are not perfect or complete, they are written in clear English. This was not my experience with my neighbors SMA gear (admittedly this could be different now because their system is also a decade old). The translation from German to English May have something to do with it? 

    Their units seem wellbuilt, however their readout codes and passwords are unnecessarily cryptic. I have worked on their system on several occasions now and would advise you to avoid SMA for an off grid set up. Their charging profile is also not battery friendly, imho. Search this forum for other opinions on this.
    Anyway, enjoy the search and welcome to the community.

    Outback Flexpower 1 (FM80, VFX3048E-230v, Mate, FlexNetDC) 2,730watts of "Grid-type" PV, 370 AmpHrs Trojan RE-B's, Honda 2000 watt genny, 100% off grid.
  • DaveyclimberDaveyclimber Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭
    I pulled the trigger on the Growatt 12000T with 250v input. It is sized well for my intended panels and can actually add a few more strings but I'm short on room for them anyway. I really did initially want an 8048 Radian but it was priced out of my budget, same with Schneider for that matter with even less wattage available. I was also really looking hard at the SI but didn't care for the fact they were 120v inverters and you had to pair them for 240v and with current pricing would be in the Outback, Schneider price range. Maybe one day I will step up to the plate but I've already nearly reached my planned budget. So to date I have 6 EG4 100Ah batteries, 18 350 watt panels, diesel generator, mounts and racking and combiner boxes with SPD since I'm in a lightning breeding ground. Growatt 12000T and an additional charge controller for the outlying afternoon array. Of course I am goning to need a bunch of ancillary items and am building a 10x16 shed to store everything in.
  • PhotowhitPhotowhit Solar Expert Posts: 5,658 ✭✭✭✭✭
    So to date I have 6 EG4 100Ah batteries, 
    Am I reading this correctly? qty 6, EG4 100 amp 12 volt lithium batteries? So I guess you will add at least 2 to have 2 strings of 4 for a 48 volt system? That's a tiny battery bank for a 12,000 watt inverter and 6300 watt array.
    Home system 4000 watt (Evergreen) array standing, with 2 Midnite Classic Lites,  Midnite E-panel, Magnum MS4024, Prosine 1800(now backup) and Exeltech 1100(former backup...lol), 660 ah 24v Forklift battery(now 10 years old). Off grid for 20 years (if I include 8 months on a bicycle).
    - Assorted other systems, pieces and to many panels in the closet to not do more projects.
  • DaveyclimberDaveyclimber Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭
    6 48 volt 100Ah batteries.
  • DaveyclimberDaveyclimber Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭
    I also have the option of adding another 2100 watts of panels down the road if I find there is enough unshaded area to justify it. Being in Western Montana there is a lack of sunshine in the fall and winter so I have a couple of generators to choose from for charging and supplemental power generation.
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