Wind turbine connections

dan1889dan1889 Registered Users Posts: 1
I have a 3kw solar setup that is hooked up to a 5kw charge controller/inverter and a 48v battery bank. I am looking to attach a wind turbine and am wondering if it's possible to connect a 600w + DC12v or 24v turbine directly to the battery bank via a separate charge controller?
Can I run them at the same time? 
I just want to trickle feed the batteries to keep them topped up when the sun isn't out. I don't expect to power my mobile home completely from the turbine just to supplement the solar panels. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
Cheers 
Dan

Comments

  • BB.BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 31,464 admin
    Welcome to the forum Dan,

    As a warning--Personally, I am not a fan of small wind turbines. Few seem to output any useful energy in anything less than a full wind storm.

    Anyway... Any charging source needs to be at a higher voltage than the batteries themselves. For a 48 volt battery bank, you need something approaching a minimum of 60 VDC to properly charge.

    Most solar and wind charge controllers are of a "buck" design... Basically, they can only take higher voltage (and lower current) and down convert to lower voltage (and higher current).

    There are a few Boost controller designs for solar:

    https://sunforgellc.com/genasun/ (one example of a solar boost controller)

    I don't know of any made for wind turbines--But I am not in the business so my knowledge is not very deep.

    There are ways of making simple AC Voltage doublers circuits:

    http://www.learningaboutelectronics.com/Articles/Voltage-doubler-circuit.php (single phase)
    http://www.reuk.co.uk/wordpress/electric-circuit/three-phase-voltage-multiplier/ (three phase)

    So, you could make your own for a 24 volt turbine (3 phase, so 3x doubling circuits) that (I think) would work.

    And you would add a simple "dump" controller to your system (if needed). Basically, a dump controller turns on if the battery bank is "charged", and dumps the excess current to a load bank (some power resistors typically).

    If you still wish to continue down the wind turbine trail... Please note: Wind turbines can be noisy, really need to be on a 10 meter or taller tower to be in non-turbulent air, tower and concrete (if used) are significant expenses, and if you are in an area with trees/obstructions the turbine needs to be taller than the obstructions--Wind turbines do not produce "useful" energy in turbulent air.

    Do not attach a turbine to the side or roof of your home. The noise will bother you, and can cause structural damage from the stress and vibration.

    I guess you are somewhere in the London area of the UK... So you don't get a lot of sun.
    http://www.solarelectricityhandbook.com/solar-irradiance.html

    London
    Average Solar Insolation figures

    Measured in kWh/m2/day onto a solar panel set at a 38° angle:
    (For best year-round performance)

    JanFebMarAprMayJun
    1.27
     
    2.04
     
    2.76
     
    3.67
     
    4.17
     
    4.20
     
    JulAugSepOctNovDec
    4.25
     
    4.16
     
    3.26
     
    2.41
     
    1.53
     
    1.05
     

    Normally, I would suggest adding more solar panels as their output is much more consistent than wind... But you just do not get a lot of winter sun.

    Here is an older discussion/thread about small wind. Very few systems even produced anywhere near their predicted output in a "windy" flat region of Netherlands:

    https://forum.solar-electric.com/discussion/3638/small-windpower-a-scam-survey-says-so/p1

    My usual suggestion is that folks work on conservation first--Find the most energy efficient devices, turn off stuff when not used, and use as little as possible. Also insulation/shading of windows/etc. when needed.

    Look for a Mini-Split Heat Pump Systems... For folks that have electric heat (and/or expensive natural gas, oil, etc.) heating, a Heat Pump can be 2x or more heating per Watt*Hour than a standard resistance based electric heater.

    If you are still interested in a wind turbine... You do need to be a "miserably" windy location. Typically need something like 12 MPH / 19 KPH / 5.4 Meters per Second winds to even begin generating any useful power.

    See if there are any neighbors that a wind turbine near you... See if they can tell you how many AH/WH per day/month/etc. that it can provide on average. Or on a windy day, see how much current/watts it is outputting...

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • mike95490mike95490 Solar Expert Posts: 9,251 ✭✭✭✭✭
    A 24V turbine cannot charge a 48V battery.  Or else I read something wrong
    Powerfab top of pole PV mount | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
    || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
    || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

    solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
    gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister ,

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