question on BlueSky 3000i MPPT controller and Trimetric 2030 meter

Hello and thanks. 

I have a new BlueSky 3000i and am beyond the return date. I just realized that this charger goes into float based on 1) 2 hours in absorption, or 2) the current decreases to 1.5 per 100AH of batteries. BUT, for option 2, the manual says I need the IPN ProRemote. I already have a Trimetric 2030 installed. 

Can this 3000i's transition to float use amps, not an arbitrary time period, using my Trimetric's shunt? I believe the shunt is identical on each meter. If yes, would I be able to leave the Trimetric 2030 operating AND the BlueSky ProRemote? 

If the above situation is awkward or not workable, then would increasing the absorption time make sense if I can determine that the charger is transferring to absorption too soon? The 3000i's absorption time is programmable. My question is about whether too long an absorption period can damage the bank. 

I have (2) 6 volt Crown 6CRV260 AGM batteries giving me only 130AH usable in a vehicle being shipped to South America for a year-long adventure. Getting the batts up to 100% using amps, not time, to exit absorption may be essential as I'll be living off this bank (no shore power). 

I'm just finishing the install now, but it's not working yet. 

What's the best thing to do?  Thanks so much!

Comments

  • EstragonEstragon Registered Users Posts: 3,590 ✭✭✭✭✭
    think you can connect both the TM and CC shunt sense wires.  AFAIK, they just measure voltage drop across the shunt - others here may know for sure.

    IMHO, it's not essential or even advisable to do extended absorbs every day.  As long as the battery gets reasonably full, sulfation will happen only slowly, if at all.  Getting to "full" (tricky to define, especially with AGMs) every week or two is enough.

    If you can't set to terminate on end-amps, you could approximate it by seeing what the TM current is near the end of the timed absorb.  If >1.5%, you could incrementally increase time until you get close to target.
    Off-grid.  
    Main daytime system ~4kw panels into 2xMNClassic150 370ah 48v bank 2xOutback 3548 inverter 120v + 240v autotransformer
    Night system ~1kw panels into 1xMNClassic150 700ah 12v bank morningstar 300w inverter
  • mcgivormcgivor Solar Expert Posts: 2,819 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Reading between the lines, the fact this is a mobile application is the PV limited in its capacity to recharge the battery, hence the desire to extend the absorption and relying on end amps to trigger transition to float. This being the case, it may work when while the batteries at in good condition, however as they age the absorption current may never reach the 1.5% resulting in  battery damage  if allowed to continue unregulated. Once in service watching carefully how the system performs will answer many questions, a remote temperature sensor would be a good addition if not included currently.


    1500W, 6× Schutten 250W Poly panels , Schneider MPPT 60 150 CC, Schneider SW 2524 inverter, 400Ah LFP 24V nominal battery bank 
    Second system 1890W  3 × 300W No name brand poly, 3×330 Sunsolar Poly panels, Morningstar TS 60 PWM controller, no name 2000W inverter 400Ah FLA 24V nominal used for water pumping and day time air conditioning.  
    5Kw Yanmar clone single cylinder air cooled diesel generator for rare emergency charging and welding.
  • outwestboundoutwestbound Registered Users Posts: 34 ✭✭
    edited November 2018 #4
    Thanks guys. mcgivor, I have a remote temp sensor for sure. 

    Based on other information I've received, the 3000i should receive the signal from the trimetric's shunt, which will allow the 3000i's absorption phase to terminate on charging rate.  

    mcgivor, I agree that observing it's behavior once running will be the key. What's new to me on this vehicle, unlike my travel trailer which has a solar system on it, is that the vehicle that's the subject of this post is a motorhome. I've never had a motorhome. Now, I got a Bosh 150 amp alternator, solar and an inverter/charger (via the generator) as charging sources. I wanted absorption to run off when the amps got to the right place, rather than based on an arbitrary time period. 

    In this system, I don't think the alternator will ever have sufficiently high voltage get the batteries to 100%. Nor will the inverter/charger, because running the generator isn't efficient towards the end, although I may use the generator occasionally for bulk charging. In any event, solar will be the key on this motorhome to keeping my bank healthy so I'll see how it works next week when I complete the solar system. 

    I'll be in South America for a year (often south, South America like Patagonia) or more in this vehicle, where the sun's angle is very small and overcast skies and rain are typical. I have 260 AH in my bank (130 usable) and 574 watts of panels, which is 2.20 watts per amp hour of battery. 120 of the watts is in the form of a ground deployed "suitcase unit", so practically, the system is more like 454 for a 1.75 ratio. I do not tilt because it's too much trouble and presents a risk climbing up on a vehicle roof. After just returning from a year in Alaska, I'm hoping this amount of watts gets me to full by around 2pm each day (assuming no driving). The key is having a system that allows me to stay in one spot for a week and not have to drive just to charge the batteries. 

    We'll see. 
    Thanks   

  • SwampStomperSwampStomper Registered Users, Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 1
    Sir, you can most certainly purchase a high amp alternator that contains the ability to adjust charging voltage up to 20VDC...Just Google the key words, "adjustable voltage alternator".

    My neighbor buddy races huge professional mud trucks and uses them with his high voltage batteries....yep his batteries are designed to produce 16VDC VS 12VDC to help him start his huge, hi compression race motors....And his alternators are designed to output fully adjustable voltages up to 20VDC.

    Now-A-Days, this stuff is rather common place if you know where to look....Good luck!
  • outwestboundoutwestbound Registered Users Posts: 34 ✭✭
    Sir, you can most certainly purchase a high amp alternator that contains the ability to adjust charging voltage up to 20VDC...Just Google the key words, "adjustable voltage alternator".

    My neighbor buddy races huge professional mud trucks and uses them with his high voltage batteries....yep his batteries are designed to produce 16VDC VS 12VDC to help him start his huge, hi compression race motors....And his alternators are designed to output fully adjustable voltages up to 20VDC.

    Now-A-Days, this stuff is rather common place if you know where to look....Good luck!
    Thanks. I wasn't clear in my post. I know about the alternator upgrades. I was looking at the marine applications by Balmer. It's money. The upgraded alternator package I was looking at was about $1,800 including the wiring necessary to make it function properly with my motorhome wiring. I just didn't want to spend the money, even if it were only $1,000. I think I'll be good if I keep an eye on the Trimetric 2030 and the weather: :-)
  • stmoloudstmoloud Registered Users Posts: 101 ✭✭
    Not sure if this is relevant but I have an external voltage regulator that will adjust to big voltages even off my ancient 40 year old 70 amp alternator. And no where near a $1000 USD.

    https://www.smartregulator.co.nz/
    760W panel array, 4 x 6v 220 ah Crown batteries, Tristar TS-45 PWM controller,  no name 600 PSW inverter. 
  • outwestboundoutwestbound Registered Users Posts: 34 ✭✭
    stmoloud said:
    Not sure if this is relevant but I have an external voltage regulator that will adjust to big voltages even off my ancient 40 year old 70 amp alternator. And no where near a $1000 USD.

    https://www.smartregulator.co.nz/
    Thanks. The system I was considering included a new auxiliary alternator in the package. 
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