Average refrigerator load?

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  • mike95490mike95490 Solar Expert Posts: 8,503 ✭✭✭✭✭
    empty cardboard boxes would work to retain the cold air, which is whats lost when the door is opened.
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  • LumisolLumisol Registered Users Posts: 374 ✭✭✭
    It would. Most refrigerators havre plastic boxes built into three bottom already. The thing is, air warms up a lot faster than water and water has a higher specific temperature.
  • mvasmvas Registered Users Posts: 360 ✭✭✭
    edited May 2017 #34
    Lumisol said:
    mvas said:
    Lumisol said:
    One of water's most significant properties is that it takes a lot of heat to it to make it get hot. Precisely, water has to absorb 4.184 Joules of heat for the temperature of one gram of water to increase 1 degree celsius (°C). For comparison sake, it only takes 0.385 Joules of heat to raise 1 gram of copper 1°C.
    What this means is that the water will not warm as quickly as air does so the fridge will not cycle on as often and when you open the door, there is less air exchange from inside to outside and when closed again, the water will take care of re-cooling the air quick so the compressor never even needs to cycle on.
    Modern fridges have cameras in them and displays on the door so you never need to open it to 'browse' for a snack.
    Here's the one we got.
    Link
    And it takes a lot of energy to get those warm water bottles cold = which costs you money.
    Modern refrigerators already have "low power long cycles", so "fullness" does not matter.
    Your idea, of inserting warm bottles of water into to fridge to improve efficiency is "an old wives tale" with no merit.
    Real World tests & measurements have proved that adding warm bottles of water just to "fill a fridge" is a waste of time & money.
    Use cold bottles from an ice chest or in our case from floating in the creek.
    No one said add warm water, that's silly.
    And who has cold water bottles from an ice chest or a creek in their back yard ?
    You spend dollars on bags of ice and the try to save a penny by adding water bottles to a fridge - good grief.
    You are being silly.
  • mvasmvas Registered Users Posts: 360 ✭✭✭
    edited May 2017 #35
    Let's assume 500 kwhr / year used by fridge.

    99.8% of the total watts consumed is from the Running amps.
    00.2% of the total watts consumed is from the Starting amps.

    500 kwhr / year x 00.2% = 1,000 w-hr / year consumed by starting amps.

    Lets say you could increase the cycle time and you could have fewer cycles
    If you could eliminate 1/3 of the starting amps you would save 333 w-hr per year = 1,000 w-hr / 3
    Or about 1 w-hr per day.

    Just opening the door and letting out the cold air and letting in the warm humid air to insert that bottle of water
    will now add more than 1 w-hr of additional cooling and then additional defrost cycling.

    Turning your fridge off at night, or any time, is a Food Safety Hazard.
    Any meat, chicken, fish, left-overs that is over 40°F for 2 hours must be thrown away.
    It can grow bacteria that cannot be killed by cooking.
    I will not turn off my fridge for 8 - 12 hours each night.
    My family's safety is not worth the risk.

    And don't you clean your fridge, like twice a year (spring & fall) ?
    How are you going prevent all of those water bottles from warming to room temperature, while cleaning?
    Oh, you are going to BUY ice?
    Now you have lost even more money.
  • EstragonEstragon Registered Users Posts: 4,326 ✭✭✭✭✭
    I did the opportunity load thing initially, because I was living off a couple of golf cart batteries and could only use the fridge when running a generator. We didn't leave food in the fridge overnight. We froze freezer packs in the fridge, and stored food in decent chest coolers with the frozen packs overnight. Covered with a parka, ice would last several days in the cooler.

    Now the AC fridge is mainly for beer and wine, so temp variance isn't really a problem. I turn it off at night so I can run on just the small inverter. Food kept in a DC fridge now.
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  • LumisolLumisol Registered Users Posts: 374 ✭✭✭
    mvas said:
    Lumisol said:
    mvas said:
    Lumisol said:
    One of water's most significant properties is that it takes a lot of heat to it to make it get hot. Precisely, water has to absorb 4.184 Joules of heat for the temperature of one gram of water to increase 1 degree celsius (°C). For comparison sake, it only takes 0.385 Joules of heat to raise 1 gram of copper 1°C.
    What this means is that the water will not warm as quickly as air does so the fridge will not cycle on as often and when you open the door, there is less air exchange from inside to outside and when closed again, the water will take care of re-cooling the air quick so the compressor never even needs to cycle on.
    Modern fridges have cameras in them and displays on the door so you never need to open it to 'browse' for a snack.
    Here's the one we got.
    Link
    And it takes a lot of energy to get those warm water bottles cold = which costs you money.
    Modern refrigerators already have "low power long cycles", so "fullness" does not matter.
    Your idea, of inserting warm bottles of water into to fridge to improve efficiency is "an old wives tale" with no merit.
    Real World tests & measurements have proved that adding warm bottles of water just to "fill a fridge" is a waste of time & money.
    Use cold bottles from an ice chest or in our case from floating in the creek.
    No one said add warm water, that's silly.
    And who has cold water bottles from an ice chest or a creek in their back yard ?
    You spend dollars on bags of ice and the try to save a penny by adding water bottles to a fridge - good grief.
    You are being silly.
    No, we have ice from the ice chest we bring our cold food to the fortress of solitude in. It was money spent already when our fridge made the ice before we leave for our adventure.
    I don't buy bags of ice, that WOULD be silly indeed. Even considering a person would do that was pretty silly of you. :)
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