Global zero extreme adventure kit

I am about to purchase the Global Zero extreme 350 adventure kit. Anyone here had experience with this product and/or the company Global Zero, and, if so, what?

Comments

  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Solar Expert Posts: 3,009 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Global zero extreme adventure kit

    Why would you want to purchase this product and what would you expect it to do? Or are you just trying to get us interested in purchasing the product? In my opinion, nothing more than high priced toys of extremely limited use.
  • CariboocootCariboocoot Banned Posts: 17,615 ✭✭
    Re: Global zero extreme adventure kit

    I think you mean "Goal Zero Extreme 350".

    It claims to store 350 Watt hours of power. Unfortunately it also admits to having a 33 Amp hour battery. So the 350 Watt hours is based on running that battery down to dead, which isn't a good idea. 198 Watt hour or less would be a more realistic expectation. AGM battery, you can "stack" them (only on the DC side, no doubt) up to four. The "Universal Inverter" is bound to be MSW.

    It is similar to other portable power packs available. Might be useful for camping. Around $500 without optional solar panels. At least you can get some half-way decent tech data on it. Will it stand up to use? That's another issue.
  • System2System2 Posts: 6,290 admin
    Re: Global zero extreme adventure kit
    I think you mean "Goal Zero Extreme 350".

    It claims to store 350 Watt hours of power. Unfortunately it also admits to having a 33 Amp hour battery. So the 350 Watt hours is based on running that battery down to dead, which isn't a good idea. 198 Watt hour or less would be a more realistic expectation. AGM battery, you can "stack" them (only on the DC side, no doubt) up to four. The "Universal Inverter" is bound to be MSW.

    It is similar to other portable power packs available. Might be useful for camping. Around $500 without optional solar panels. At least you can get some half-way decent tech data on it. Will it stand up to use? That's another issue.
    I did not find any other products similar to this with better prices. Could you name others that might be of quality? The $500 for only a 30-watt panel seems exorbitant to me also but the supposed 350 watts seems okay. I would buy the around $500 product with an additional around $300 for another battery/inverter/controller for a supposed 700 watts. I am thinking of going portable because I live in an area with hoodlums who would be tempted to throw rocks etc. at my panels so portable seems better for me. Any other advice?
  • System2System2 Posts: 6,290 admin
    Re: Global zero extreme adventure kit
    Why would you want to purchase this product and what would you expect it to do? Or are you just trying to get us interested in purchasing the product? In my opinion, nothing more than high priced toys of extremely limited use.
    I am not shilling for this company, just wanting advice on whether anyone else had experience with this product before I would purchase it. I have been pursuing portable lately because I live in an area where hoodlums might throw rocks at my panels so portable might work better for me. Any portable systems that are not "toys"? I have limited funds so am trying to get a system for my computer, ereaders etc. and then hope to build to power a small refrigerator. Any advice?
  • SevenSeven Solar Expert Posts: 292 ✭✭
    Re: Global zero extreme adventure kit

    You need to know what your loads will be and build from that. You can buy a cheap kill-a-watt meter and plug your stuff into it and see what it is drawing. Do that for each item you want to power and then add them together for a worst case scenario. Once that is done it is simple math to figure out what you will need.

    People normally underestimate their loads and overestimate the power they will have.

    You can do a very simple backup battery with a single panel
  • rollandelliottrollandelliott Solar Expert Posts: 834 ✭✭
    Re: Global zero extreme adventure kit

    solar is inherently not portable because the panels are so ineffcient. Sure if you want to run a calculator, or some dim lights small solar panels work well.

    but for a fridge, pc. etc you cannot run those kinds of things reliable on portable panels.

    my suggestion is to move, if that is an option.
  • SevenSeven Solar Expert Posts: 292 ✭✭
    Re: Global zero extreme adventure kit

    This post has a link to a portable setup like you are talking about.
    http://forum.solar-electric.com/showpost.php?p=61485&postcount=38
  • BB.BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 30,641 admin
    Re: Global zero extreme adventure kit

    It is really difficult to give you a good answer without knowing the details of your needs...

    For example, here is a person that was looking for an insulin refrigerator for use during power outages... Very small.

    Refrigerators are one of the larger power sinks for an off-grid system. Computers can be variable (desktop system running 10 hours a day vs a net book running 2 hours a day, etc.).

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • PhotowhitPhotowhit Solar Expert Posts: 5,219 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Global zero extreme adventure kit

    I haven't seen them much lately, but the jump start thingys likely have a similar sized battery. Some of them had small inverters as well...
    ...Something like that might give you the experience of small rechargable storage...
    ...maybe you can find one that will recharge via a ligher plug...

    Something to check in to, just an idea, worth what you paid for it!
    Home system 4000 watt (Evergreen) array standing, with 2 Midnite Classic Lites,  Midnite E-panel, Prosine 1800 and Exeltech 1100, 660 ah 24v ForkLift battery. Off grid for @16 of last 17 years. Assorted other systems, and to many panels in the closet to not do more...lol
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