Truth About Skystream & SWWP

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Comments

  • hillbillyhillbilly Solar Expert Posts: 334 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    RE: customer service

    Wow, this is all really sad to read. Very disappointing on many levels. Just a quick not on the lack of customer service, as to me this is a HUGELY valuable perk for any company to have and one that I personally will pay considerably for. I've dealt with many companies in all sorts of industries, some who have treated me well, and had good tech support, solid warranty policies, etc... and some who have not.
    Those who excel in this area seem to long and prosperous lives, those who don't usually get a couple of my dollars ONCE and never again. Particularly with a more expensive, and/or complex purchase, I find that this is of crucial importance... stuff happens, things break, fall apart, etc. I will say that in the RE industry, I've only had signifigant dealings with two companies: one is a local retail shop that has been VERY helpful, and the other is Surrette battery who has been outstanding (they've spent easily a couple of hours on the phone, and gave me a mountain of material via email to help insure that I was treating my battery bank well).
    Thing is, sometimes that extra little bit costs a wee bit more in the "upfront costs", but I'll gladly pay that anytime as often the long term costs work out to be cheaper...
    very sorry to hear about those layoffs...
  • DapdanDapdan Solar Expert Posts: 313 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    Hey all,

    Let me add that the thing about customer service is that it will bring you more sales or less. I can gurantee that any one reading this post will not buy a swwp product if they think customer services and parts will not be adequately available. I am sure everyone reading this will also discourage others from buying their product. So maybe NAWS will take heed and stop selling their product as well, you never know.

    So maybe in the near future SWWP will be in the same category as BZ Products Inc.

    Oh yeah, Truth can you elaborate on the Whisper 100 and 200. I actually bought a 200 from NAWS last year but I havent installed it. It is sitting in my basement. What kind of failures are common with the 200 and what makes the 100 different and better than the 200.

    Here in Barbados there are several people with 100s and 200s. There is on guy that has a 200 on a 50ft tower for about 2 years running constantly and he has not had any problems. There is even on guy who has a 500. Also is there any failure patterns for the controller unit.

    Cheers...
    Damani
  • jacobsjacobs Solar Expert Posts: 72 ✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    The biggest problem with the RE industry today is the government tax credits. That always has brought out the worst in the industry, with both the established and new companies. It seems the current motto is design something that looks good, produce it as cheaply as possible, and don't worry about lifespan or service. Fortunately there still are a few (very few) manufacturers and dealers out there that are of the old school that believe in a quality product and service. I've been very blessed with having used them. Before buying anything, do lots of research. Don't get in a hurry. Buyer beware.

    Like I've said in previous posts, small wind (<10kw) can be very simple and dependable. It isn't rocket science. You just can't use sensitive electronics to control a turbine that's acting like a lighting rod and collecting tons of static electricity. Numerous manufacturers since the 1980's have tried this and failed and it ain't going to change! All the successful pre REA manufacturers back in the 1930's and 40's used mechanical governors. With a mechanical governor, the turbine keeps on producing safely even in a 100mph wind. No brakes (mechanical or electronic) slamming on at 30mph. What are these current engineers thinking or are they? KISS

    More Thoughts: How many radio, TV or cell phone companies install their electronics (transmitters) on top of their towers? Answer....NONE! That would be stupid. Why would a wind generator manufacturer do that?
  • RandomJoeRandomJoe Solar Expert Posts: 472 ✭✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    This is all disappointing to hear, for sure. I've been happy enough with my 12V Air Breeze (I'm down on the bottom end of the power scale! :D ) but did wonder about the quality of the electronics inside it. I had a minor regulation issue with mine when I first got it, and was actually surprised to get an email reply on a Sunday, of all things!

    But I'm enough of an electronics nut, if the circuit board dies in mine, I'll probably butcher it and go the Otherpower route - just bring the wild AC down and homebrew the rectifier / dump load setup. (Assuming, of course, I can get at the wiring to do so...)

    I am also quick to point out to those who ask that it's more of an expensive toy ("more fun to watch than the solar panels") than a cost-effective way to produce power. No misconceptions about that here!
    jacobs wrote: »
    More Thoughts: How many radio, TV or cell phone companies install their electronics (transmitters) on top of their towers? Answer....NONE! That would be stupid. Why would a wind generator manufacturer do that?

    To be fair, at least with commercial two-way radio systems, it's not uncommon to tower-mount the equipment. Amateur radio systems are also sometimes done this way. (I've been 1100 feet up one TV tower in town. Wow, what an amazing view! :cool: ) And even cell phone system installers would like to have as short of a coax run as possible (thus why they like using the tops of tall buildings). Wireless internet providers almost always use tower-mounted transceivers as the signal losses at the frequencies used are killer.

    But then all these use cabinets with sufficient room that are simply nearby the antennas (the business end of things). They aren't cramming all the radio gear inside the antennas themselves! ;) (Although some of the wifi gear comes close...)
  • gostgost Registered Users Posts: 9
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    I don't actually have a problem, per se, with the idea of having electronic components inside the nacelle of a wind turbine. We have all kinds of electronics in our vehicles that manage to take the shock, vibration, and temperature extremes that we put them through. I don't see anything inside a Skystream that should be particularly sensitive. All it takes is for SWWP to be willing to put as much thought into engineering as they do into marketing. A little honest tech support wouldn't hurt here either, along with a dollop or two of corporate integrity.

    To me it seems to be an issue of quality control. The failed Skystream circuit board I've replaced has obvious scorch marks on it, so it's apparent that something overloaded. If it's the same on the one I have to replace next Tuesday, I'd say there's a fundamental design flaw involved here.

    The entire board looks like it was dipped in lacquer, or something, so it appears to be fairly moisture resistant, although that wouldn't help where the wiring harness plugs into it. But, water leakage into the nacelle should not be a problem as long as the surfaces that the o-ring comes into contact with are properly machined, and the bolts are properly tightened. I've worked with deep-sea camera housings and electronics protected by no more than a simple o-ring which survive for months at a time on the ocean floor at depths of a mile or more.

    I do like the simplicity of mechanical speed regulation for wind turbines, but they also have their own set of problems. Furling involves turning the rotor sideways to the wind, reducing the swept area. While that works to keep the RPMs under control, because of the pitch of the blade, it causes each of them to be subjected to sudden greater, then lesser wind force as they travels through each cycle. Spin that rotor at 1000 RPM and the induced vibrational effect becomes quite audible, eventually causing stress fractures right at the attachment point near the hub. There's a lot of rotational inertia involved here as well, causing undue stress to the hub bearings. Furling is also fairly slow to respond to sudden gusts and turbulence, which was also a problem with some of the older mechanical techniques, such as the flapping air-brake governor method used by the old Winchargers.

    The best mechanical design, IMO, is the one currently used by Proven, a downwind turbine like the Skystream. The hinged blades are mounted onto an angled hub plate and held in place by a set of springs. As the wind speed increases, the blades fold away from the it and the angled connection plate causes the blades to change pitch. The force on each blade stays balanced throughout the cycle. The failure point here tends to be the springs themselves, through metal fatigue, although Proven has a new design for these on their 15kW model which looks pretty promising.
  • jacobsjacobs Solar Expert Posts: 72 ✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP
    gost wrote: »

    Furling involves turning the rotor sideways to the wind, reducing the swept area. While that works to keep the RPMs under control, because of the pitch of the blade, it causes each of them to be subjected to sudden greater, then lesser wind force as they travels through each cycle. Spin that rotor at 1000 RPM and the induced vibrational effect becomes quite audible, eventually causing stress fractures right at the attachment point near the hub. There's a lot of rotational inertia involved here as well, causing undue stress to the hub bearings. Furling is also fairly slow to respond to sudden gusts and turbulence, which was also a problem with some of the older mechanical techniques, such as the flapping air-brake governor method used by the old Winchargers.

    The best mechanical design, IMO, is the one currently used by Proven, a downwind turbine like the Skystream.

    The governors I was talking about were not the Wincharger air brake nor turning the rotor sideways to the wind. The governors that have proven track records pitched their blades based on RPM's were made by Allied, Aeromatic, Winpower, Jacobs, and others. They were VERY quick to respond to gusts and were quiet. I've personally ran a pre REA Jacobs for 20 years using both their flyball and blade actuated governors in very turbulent, gusty winds up to 100mph and they are very reliable and simple. Why reinvent the wheel? Simplicity is beautiful!

    As to the Proven wind generator with it's flexible blade coupling and plastic blades .....only time will tell. I do know the Proven is sometimes VERY noisy. Downwind machines experience tower shadow which creates vibration and increases potential failures.
  • jacobsjacobs Solar Expert Posts: 72 ✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP
    RandomJoe wrote: »

    To be fair, at least with commercial two-way radio systems, it's not uncommon to tower-mount the equipment.

    Ok, I stand partially corrected. In the very, very few instances electronics are installed on a tower, there is very good reason and when failures do occur due to lightning, service personnel can climb the tower. There is never a good reason for the electronics of a wind generator to be installed on top of a tower (lightning rod) that can only be serviced by a bucket truck or a crane.
  • gostgost Registered Users Posts: 9
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    RandomJoe:

    I like your attitude about rebuilding your Air Breeze. You'll have to add another slip ring to output the 3-phase, since there's only two for the rectified DC. I have an extra one if you ever need it.

    The challenge will be to figure out a mechanical overspeed mechanism since the Air Breeze also uses an electronic control built into the circuit board. This could be a fun project, though. I bet the otherpower dudes could come up with some wickedly diabolical solution. LOL, maybe a centrifugally activated playing card attached to a spring operated clothes pin. And speaking of Winchargers, that air brake mechanism might be perfect, now that I think about it.

    Wind turbines do more than just provide renewable energy. They also provide endless hours of entertainment figuring out how to fix them. Lets face it, PV is boring. (Just kidding.)

    Jacob:

    I completely agree with you about some of the older solutions. Sorry to give the wrong impression, just trying to point out that mechanical systems can have drawbacks too. Quality engineering, whether mechanical or electrical will always stand the test of time.

    The downwind tower shadow does cause a fluttering sound in high winds, obviously indicating turbulence and blade vibration, although not nearly as severe as with furling. It's especially noticeable on the smaller models where the blades are much closer to the tower and turn at a higher RPM. I won't argue that it's a perfect solution, but the hinged blade greatly mitigates any stress fracturing potential. I'll humbly stand by my opinion that it's the best mechanical system on the market right now.

    The new composite polymer blades do seem to be holding up quite well so far and are MUCH quieter than the old wooden blades. Haven't heard of any problems yet, but as you said: only time will tell.
  • jacobsjacobs Solar Expert Posts: 72 ✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP
    gost wrote: »

    The new composite polymer blades do seem to be holding up quite well so far and are MUCH quieter than the old wooden blades. Haven't heard of any problems yet, but as you said: only time will tell.

    How many people will tolerate the occasional helicopter type noise of the currently produced Proven? Even when it's at it's quietest, it's still far noisier than the old Jacobs machines.

    Yes, I'm very opinionated about the older wind generator designs but they have time proven themselves. Many of the old Jacobs wind generators are still around and running great after 80 years. Will ANY of the currently manufactured machines do that? Are they designed for long life or a quick sale?
  • gostgost Registered Users Posts: 9
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP
    jacobs wrote: »
    How many people will tolerate the occasional helicopter type noise of the currently produced Proven? Even when it's at it's quietest, it's still far noisier than the old Jacobs machines.

    Yes, I'm very opinionated about the older wind generator designs but they have time proven themselves. Many of the old Jacobs wind generators are still around and running great after 80 years. Will ANY of the currently manufactured machines do that? Are they designed for long life or a quick sale?

    Guess we'll have to wait 80 years to find out. But don't forget, there was plenty of garbage being put on the market back in the "good old days" too. Capitalism wasn't invented just last week.

    It's always easy to point out a classic after the fact. Hopefully, just like back then, the glut of new machines being developed at the moment will be winnowed out by the market place. The cream will always rise to the top.

    You seem to want to get into a spitting contest over the virtues of this machine vs that. I do happen to like Proven's engineering and their ongoing willingness to improve their product, which would seem to indicate that they might be in it for the long haul, unlike, perhaps, SWWP. You call it a helicopter noise, I'll call it a flutter, which happens only during the heaviest winds. I don't find it objectionable. Guess we'll have to agree to disagree on that one.

    BTW, I'd love to see an old Jake that's been running continuously for 80 years without ever having being rebuilt or having any parts replaced. Where is one located?
  • jacobsjacobs Solar Expert Posts: 72 ✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    The Proven's occasional "helicopter noise" I was referring to I heard was NOT in high winds. The wind was about 20mph. It's not something I would tolerate waking me up in the middle of the night. I guarantee any close neighbors and or zoning officials would quickly shut down. It was that loud! When the Proven is at it's quietest, it's still significantly louder than my Jacobs.

    As far as the older generators, I can only speak from my 25 years personal experience and what the old timers that lived with them have told me. Governors that feather the blades do work very effectively, quietly, are trouble free and only rarely need maintenance. I'm not a great fan of the old dc generators. The new ac permanent magnet alternators are more efficient, much lighter weight, less maintenance, and less expensive to manufacture. Sitka spruce blades last for decades if painted occasionally. Plastic that is currently for the Proven blades and fiberglass in the Skystrean......I personally wouldn't expect them to last more that 10 to15 years.

    My point is it IS possible to design and make an efficient wind generator that is long lasting, economical, trouble free, quiet (in ALL wind speeds) and simple to service.
  • gostgost Registered Users Posts: 9
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    Your points are all well taken. I totally agree that it's possible to design and manufacture a quality small wind machine. Even in the 21st century.

    Perhaps painted spruce will turn out to be the best possible material for making wind turbine blades, assuming we can find enough old growth timber that we're willing to cut down for the purpose. If we never try new materials, how will we ever know if there's a better alternative? But the idea that all modern wind developers are only interested in a making a quick buck is just plain wrong, in my opinion. So is the idea that all the old timers were only concerned with perfection.

    Skystream blades are known to have had problems with de-lamination and the company is doing little to address the problem, not even admitting that it exists. I have not yet heard of any of the new Proven blades having any issues, but perhaps you are aware of something that I am not. When you lay a Skystream blade next to a new Proven 6 blade, the difference in quality seems fairly obvious. I'm no expert in polymers, but I do get the impression that Proven has put a lot of careful consideration into their material selection. Heck, maybe it'd be worth slapping a coat of paint on polymer blades too, just to better protect them from UV light. Couldn't hurt, I suppose, but you'd have to rebalance them and they'd be a little heavier.

    But getting back to the original topic of this thread, I would suggest that the ultimate difference between a SWWP blade and a Proven blade has little to do with whether either company should have used spruce instead of polymer, but has more to do with workmanship and company integrity.

    As for your experience with Proven blade noise, I only have my own experience to go by. I've been involved with several Proven installations at this point, and my office is within about 200 feet line of sight distance from a Proven 6 that's been operating for a year and a half. It's been through some pretty brutal wind storms over the last two winters, with gusts well into the 90 mph range. Yes, you can hear it pretty clearly during those gales, but only when you go outside. I can't hear it at all inside my office, but then the sound of the wind against the building may well be masking it. In a 20 mph wind, it's pretty darn quiet. You can hear a slight swishing sound, but not if a car should happen to be driving by. I do know there has never been a single complaint from any neighbors, some of whom are almost within falling distance of the tower. The nice thing is that the RPMs stay almost completely constant during those big peak winds, continuing to feed full power out to the grid without the turbine needing to turn itself out of the wind for protection. The kW-h really rack up at those times, 20A at 300VDC. The turbine has had a few other issues, but not with noise.

    Perhaps the Proven you listened to was not assembled properly, or was in need of service. Maybe one of the springs came loose, which has been known to happen, especially if the bolts weren't thread-locked or torqued properly. A sampling of one doesn't seem like much of a data set to condemn an entire company over.

    The truth is, there's no such thing as a completely silent wind turbine that I'm aware of. Each machine has it's own idiosyncrasies, and that's part of the enjoyment of working with them. I do think it's fantastic that you are so happy with your old Jake. Here's to another 80 years of reliable service.
  • jacobsjacobs Solar Expert Posts: 72 ✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    I've never even seen a 6kw Proven. My experience is with several new 3kw battery charging Provens and they were all very noisy. A year ago, the 3kw's were selling for about $14,000 base price uninstalled.

    If Jacobs could retail a well made complete 3kw system for $400 in 1936 (that's $6700 today folks) which included purchasing expensive labor intensive to build dc generators from Robbins & Myers, then build the rest of the system complete with crude, although very expensive at that time, electronics, WHY can't anyone retail a complete, quiet, long lasting, efficient system for that today? Using modern production techniques, much less expensive to make alternators, they should be selling for less than half that amount ($6700) today. I'm sorry folks, but $1.25/watt max. retail. Anything more than that IS pure greed.
  • nielniel Solar Expert Posts: 10,311 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    try to refocus a bit guys as this is about skystream and swwp here. feel free to start another thread comparing the other 2 wind turbine companies if you like.
  • jacobsjacobs Solar Expert Posts: 72 ✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    Niel,
    I agree....I'm tired of the subject anyway.
  • gostgost Registered Users Posts: 9
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    Amen to that. Let's move on.
  • Truth SquadTruth Squad Solar Expert Posts: 126 ✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    Someone asked about the reliability of the Whisper 200. Well, it's ok, but I wouldn't suggest leaving it up in high wind conditions. The 200 is basically a 100 with longer blades (via extentions) on it. The rotor cans for both are coming from China, so.... I have seen welds that failed and the blade plates separated from the rotor can.

    On the Breeze, the grey blades have been having problems with UV degrading the blades and causing delam. Keep an eye on those blades. The black blades don't seem to have that problem.
  • RandomJoeRandomJoe Solar Expert Posts: 472 ✭✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP
    On the Breeze, the grey blades have been having problems with UV degrading the blades and causing delam. Keep an eye on those blades. The black blades don't seem to have that problem.

    Okay, thanks. Mine are - of course - the grey ones! :roll:
  • Truth SquadTruth Squad Solar Expert Posts: 126 ✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    Keep an eye on those blades then. You might even think about calling in and requesting a set of black blades pre-emptively.

    Back to Skystream, one of the big problems with the circuitry is the quality and design both. You could always tell when a bad batch of capacitors were in because during testing, you'd hear them blowing up in production. You'd hear "pow-pow-pow-pow-pow-pow-pow!"---sounded like a string of firecrackers.

    Southwest Windpower is now selling segmented towers for the Skystream. Be advised those towers come from China and have quality issues of their own related to the welds. Once more, buying cheap crap from China.
  • DapdanDapdan Solar Expert Posts: 313 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    Truth,

    In respect of the 200 and 100 you mention that the machines are identical except for the extention at the rotor cans. Is this a definite fact wiring, magnets, bearing everything else is identical.

    If this is the case why would you rate the 100 much higher than the 200. Please explain this to me. If it has to do solely with the rotor diameter would using the 100 rotor blades improve it to the same status of the 100. Also would those welding issue extend to the 100 as well and therefore it wouldd be advisable not to allow the 100 the endure high winds.

    You see I have a 200 and I am wondering what is the best course of action for me at this stage. I have not installed it as yet.

    Oh yeah, what about the blades for the 200 and 100 how have they been holding up or failing.

    What about the controller. Is that any good. What kind of failures are typical for this device

    Cheers..
    Damani
  • halfcrazyhalfcrazy Solar Expert Posts: 717 ✭✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    I have been told the whisper 100 is a pretty decent machine the 200 is the exact turbine with blade extensions thus making it a lot weaker.
  • peterakopeterako Solar Expert Posts: 144 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    Hi there i have a whisper 100 and 200, no the are not the same the 200 has a bigger rotor ( magnet field ) the blade extension is a simple squire steel pipe :confused:.
    And the fixing against the rotor hub is a joke only two screws a blade from one is below the cone so you must be care full to align the second hole 100% the second hole is holding as well the plastic cone and you can not put any force or you brake the plastic.:grr

    The tail is the same :roll: yes i replaced it the last time it wash not holding correct in the wind, and moving left right in the wind.

    The power production from the 200 is around 600 to 650 Watt only a few second it is seeing until 900 to 1000 Watt.

    the remote display is a electronic joke. If the controller gets locks up because of passing by mobil telephone, bleutooth, switching lights on off next to the display or my heating thermostat behind the wall it locks up and is not resetting.

    so i have to pull the plug from the display to power cycle.

    a in 10 month service every second month i take the 200 down for repair. the 100 after 3 years only ones after very bad weather just to make sure all is oke.

    Greetings from Greece:cool:
  • kenputerkenputer Solar Expert Posts: 27
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    Anybody have any info on the new DLCC for the whisper 100 that is avalible from www.deltechnet.com that will help make the whisper produce power in winds under 12 mph?

    [from moderator: Comfirmed link should be fine by Windsun--probably an older antivirus program/def file.-Bill B.]
  • gostgost Registered Users Posts: 9
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP
    ...Back to Skystream, one of the big problems with the circuitry is the quality and design both. You could always tell when a bad batch of capacitors were in because during testing, you'd hear them blowing up in production. You'd hear "pow-pow-pow-pow-pow-pow-pow!"---sounded like a string of firecrackers.

    Southwest Windpower is now selling segmented towers for the Skystream. Be advised those towers come from China and have quality issues of their own related to the welds. Once more, buying cheap crap from China.

    These circuit board problems really concern me, especially if SWWP is unwilling to do anything about upgrading their source suppliers. Considering last year's price increases, it seems like the quality will keep going down even as the price goes up.

    A note about monopole towers. Many U.S. tower manufacturers are now offering quality engineered monopoles for the small wind market. We've been able to get monopoles at extremely better prices than those offered by SWWP, and up to 120 feet tall, although those are still pretty pricey. These aren't tilt-up at that size, but you can have climbing pegs and safety cables added as well. Check with companies who manufacture monopoles for the cell industry, most of them are looking for new sources of revenue right now.

    Switching gears, I saw a cute little alternative to the Air Breeze at a recent workshop, called the "Chinook 200" at a much better price. Also has a built in rectifier in 12 and 24 volt versions. Don't know much more about it than that, other than it's made in Montana. Maybe it's been covered here before, but I thought I'd mention it. Hope they're using quality materials. Would love to hear a review from anybody that's tried one of these.
  • mike95490mike95490 Solar Expert Posts: 7,249 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP
    gost wrote: »
    "Chinook 200" at a much better price. Also has a built in rectifier in 12 and 24 volt versions. Don't know much more about it than that, other than it's made in Montana. Maybe it's been covered here before, but I thought I'd mention it. Hope they're using quality materials. Would love to hear a review from anybody that's tried one of these.

    I had to run and look that up. Their spec at www.chinookturbines.com/Chinook200Spec.pdf

    [This link should be fine -Bill B.]

    indicate a month, 24/7 (30 days?) is about 19KWh or .633 KWh day (about 25W?) at cut-in speed of 3.5ms/7.8mph.
    Of course it goes up from there.
    Powerfab top of pole PV mount | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
    || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
    || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

    solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
    gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister ,

  • peterakopeterako Solar Expert Posts: 144 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    Kenputer when i am looking at the link that you give and go around to find in formation by the forum section i receive a VIRUS :grr.

    I hoop that this is not a trick but i advice to remove your link.

    p.s. if you load the generator at low speed low voltage you stall and stop the generator there is no mass behind it to use a power boost.

    Greetings from Greece
  • mike95490mike95490 Solar Expert Posts: 7,249 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    http://onlinelinkscan.com/ scans pages on line. Gave the deltechnet.com page a clean OK, but FORUMS often have script kiddies, and lots of embedded stuff piled into them, and you are much more likely to get germs there.
    Just be glad your AV caught it, and thanks for the warning.
    Powerfab top of pole PV mount | Listeroid 6/1 w/st5 gen head | XW6048 inverter/chgr | Iota 48V/15A charger | Morningstar 60A MPPT | 48V, 800A NiFe Battery (in series)| 15, Evergreen 205w "12V" PV array on pole | Midnight ePanel | Grundfos 10 SO5-9 with 3 wire Franklin Electric motor (1/2hp 240V 1ph ) on a timer for 3 hr noontime run - Runs off PV ||
    || Midnight Classic 200 | 10, Evergreen 200w in a 160VOC array ||
    || VEC1093 12V Charger | Maha C401 aa/aaa Charger | SureSine | Sunsaver MPPT 15A

    solar: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Solar
    gen: http://tinyurl.com/LMR-Lister ,

  • System2System2 Posts: 6,290 admin
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    I know AppState has experienced all of the Skystream problems, except for water in the nacelle problem, but the unit they have on a 70' tower looks to be stable for over a year now.

    You can see the output over the last year at:
    http://view2.fatspaniel.net/FST/Portal/SouthWestWindPower/siteD/ExecView.html

    Truth Squad...do you think the Skystream has a chance at success, despite the management issues and the past problems with the technology?
  • Truth SquadTruth Squad Solar Expert Posts: 126 ✭✭
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    My point about the 200 is the overall geometry of the thing. The aluminum housing is the same as the 100. When you add bigger blades to the same housing as a unit with smaller blades, you increase the forces applied. This can be seen when you add a router bit bigger than a router is rated for. Sure, you might get away with it for a while. But later, you see shattered bearings, wallered-out bearing housings, and motors burned up. Now, on both the Whisper 100 and 200, there is now an access panel to wire the turbine for voltage. This is a weak spot in the housing and housings have broken right there at that access panel cut-out. Another thing I have seen is spindles broken on Whisper 200s. And, as I said before, the welds broken at the blade plates. The blades? Those are actually fine. I haven't seen blade failures on them. The controller? Well, there have been a lot of improvements made since the old days when the EZ Wire was known as the "EZ Fire". But, again, emphasis at Southwest Windpower is placed on cost of parts, not necessarily quality. The guys on the production floor are doing an excellent job out there, so it's not their fault.
  • BB.BB. Super Moderators Posts: 26,758 admin
    Re: Truth About Skystream & SWWP

    I looked at the Chinook site and search the web--I did not see any problems (I am using FireFox on XP)--but I have my browser locked down pretty well (NoScript, Addblock Plus).

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
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