Solar Panel + pump = Sprinklers

OkeechobeeOkeechobee Registered Users Posts: 2

It's been my desire to get familiar with solar power as a hobby, and I've looked into building a battery system with panels but the costs get out of hand.

Maybe a much more simple system is the way to get my feet wet:  A panel or panels directly powering a pump to run some sprinklers in my backyard.

I have a small fresh water dock on a lake 2-3 feet above the water.  It's would be an ideal spot for a surface pump and panel(s).  Sprinkler pipes need to rise about 10 feet above the dock and extend 30-40 feet. I'm at sea level.  The lake water would be sandy.

 I could use some help picking out a pump and panels.  12v or 24v? 

 I would guess this could be done with a 100-200 watt output from solar panel(s).

 I might need a Linear Current Booster between the Solar and pump.

 It would be nice to have a pressure gauge on the output from the pump.

Comments

  • WaterWheelWaterWheel Registered Users Posts: 337 ✭✭✭
    The pressure gauge would be easy enough to add.      There are a few companies out there that sell solar powered pump setups.      They are sometimes used for filling water troughs for livestock ect.       

    Conext XW6848 with PDP, SCP, 80/600 controller, 60/150 controller and Conext battery monitor

    21 SW280 panels on Schletter ground mount

    48v Rolls 6CS 27P

  • AnawaAnawa Solar Expert Posts: 211 ✭✭✭
    A couple of things to consider. Things I discovered doing a similar project.

    You've got the right idea: panel, linear booster, pump, then..... you may want to use soaker hoses in lieu of sprinklers. I'm assuming you're in Florida (i.e. Ockeechobe), thus the sprinkler would be a better solution for ground coverage (sandy and all that). A good pump with the linear booster may be able to maintain the pressure necessary to project a stream. I don't know. But, you can try and always default back to the hoses. 

    One thing I do know is that you will need to filter the water somehow and install a back flow valve so your pump doesn't have to "start" suction each time it starts-up. Find one with a flapper (less resistance). I would also recommend that you use "slick pipe" (pvc) from your pump to where you have your water distribution (hoses), resistance (less) is a major concern with such a system. Unless there is a real need for a pressure gauge, I'm not sure you need one. Hey, if your sprinklers are squirting as best they can, is it important that you know the working "pressure"?  Just saying, think resistance.

    My lake irrigation system used only an 80 watt panel and served me well. But, at that time, I had a very low bar for my watering demands. Folks here on this forum are far more knowledgeable about power needs and such, hopefully someone will chime-in and help you spec-out a pump configuration. 

    Good luck with the pumping.
    Paul 
    in Georgia

    System 1: PV- 410w Evergreen, Mppt- Blue Sky Solar Boost, Batt - 225ah Deka AGM, 12v led house lighting,
    System 2: PV- 215w Kyocera, PWM - Morningstar PS30, Batt- 225ah Deka GC's, 12v led house lighting, Dankoff 12v water pump,
    System 3: PV- 1.5kw Kyocera, Grundfos 11 SQF well pump, 3000 gal above ground water storage, dom water & irrigation,
    System 4: PV- 6.1kw Kyocera, Mppt- Outback FM80-2ea, Inverter- Outback FX3648-2ea, Batt- 804ah GB traction, Grundfos BMQE booster pump 240v, Mitsibushi mini-splits 240v, 18k and 15k
  • OkeechobeeOkeechobee Registered Users Posts: 2
    Thanks for the responses.  

    Good point on the pressure gauge.  I could design a PVC solution where I can bypass or even remove a pressure gauge for maximum pressure.   

    I wonder about the water going in from the lake.  Can a foot value provide enough filtering for a pump?  Sprinklers have their own filters so I don't have to worry about them.   I see that there are filters on lake input pipes, but it seems like they would slow things down. 
  • AnawaAnawa Solar Expert Posts: 211 ✭✭✭
    With the system that you're engineering, filtering the lake water is essential. Yes, a foot valve will provide some filtering, but you ultimately will be dealing with clogs at the influent (foot valve), as well as, clogs at the sprinkler heads. So what do you do, engineer easy access to clean both ends. If you're able to easily pull-up the pump intake and brush off debris and the like (or replace a removal filter), life on the lake will be better! Just saying.
    Paul 
    in Georgia

    System 1: PV- 410w Evergreen, Mppt- Blue Sky Solar Boost, Batt - 225ah Deka AGM, 12v led house lighting,
    System 2: PV- 215w Kyocera, PWM - Morningstar PS30, Batt- 225ah Deka GC's, 12v led house lighting, Dankoff 12v water pump,
    System 3: PV- 1.5kw Kyocera, Grundfos 11 SQF well pump, 3000 gal above ground water storage, dom water & irrigation,
    System 4: PV- 6.1kw Kyocera, Mppt- Outback FM80-2ea, Inverter- Outback FX3648-2ea, Batt- 804ah GB traction, Grundfos BMQE booster pump 240v, Mitsibushi mini-splits 240v, 18k and 15k
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