Adding Wind Turbine To My 12VDC Solar System?

timsim00timsim00 Registered Users Posts: 15 ✭✭
I am looking for a wind turbine to add to my 12VDC off-grid solar system.  In our Northern Arizona location, we could get up to 2 days without sun, and windy nights.  I would like to add a turbine to charge the batteries in these times.

Can someone explain what Wind Turbine device I would need and the equipment to blend it into the same solar battery bank?  Such as a dump load and charge controller?

My Current Setup:
4x100W Renogy Panels tied in parallel
8 6VDC Duracell SLIGC115 FLA 230AH tied in series and parallel for 920AH @ 12VDC
Renogy MPPT 40A Charge Controller
Renogy 2KW PSW Inverter

Let me know if you have any questions and all suggestions are greatly appreciated.


Comments

  • ThomThom Solar Expert Posts: 189 ✭✭✭
    You are under paneled now . Add 4 more panels. 

    Thom
    Off grid since 1984. 430w of panel, 300w suresine , 4 gc batteries 12v system, Rogue mpt3024 charge controller , air breeze windmill, Mikita 2400w generator
  • littleharbor2littleharbor2 Solar Expert Posts: 1,405 ✭✭✭✭
     With that large of a battery bank (and without preaching about parallel strings) You need something like 90+ charging amps to properly maintain those batteries. It looks like you currently have about 28 amps on a good day.

     You should have your 12 volt panels series wired, two at a time to bring up your PV input voltage high enough for your MPPT controller to do any good. I'm surprised you are charging at all with your current setup.

     Small wind turbines may add somewhat to your charging scheme. You need a wind specific controller that you should get with your turbine. Locate it as high as possible and as far from any obstructions as you can. Don't attach any part of the structure to your living quarters unless you like incessant resonating sound to lull you to sleep. Oh keep in mind wind turbines aren't maintenance free.

    2.1 Kw Suntech 175 mono, Classic 200, Trace SW 4024 ( 15 years old  but brand new out of sealed factory box Jan. 2015), Bogart Tri-metric, 700 ah @24 volt AGM battery bank. Plenty of Baja Sea of Cortez sunshine.

  • timsim00timsim00 Registered Users Posts: 15 ✭✭
     With that large of a battery bank (and without preaching about parallel strings) You need something like 90+ charging amps to properly maintain those batteries. It looks like you currently have about 28 amps on a good day.

     You should have your 12 volt panels series wired, two at a time to bring up your PV input voltage high enough for your MPPT controller to do any good. I'm surprised you are charging at all with your current setup.
    @littleharbor2 Thank you for the input.  I did the parallel to get as much current from the panels as possible, since I have no distance/voltage drop at all.  If I did 2 in series and then tied the series in parallel, that would decrease my daily current, correct?

    Did you come up with the 28 amps from the 100W panel rating?
  • littleharbor2littleharbor2 Solar Expert Posts: 1,405 ✭✭✭✭
    Your MPPT controller will convert all the higher voltage to your batteries requirement while boosting the amperage. You will gain amperage as the controller does the conversion instead of losing the upper end of the voltage, and consequently amperage, as a PWM controller does. I'm sure the pros here can give a better detailed explanation of MPPT.  Search "MPPT" here for plenty of other threads on the subject.

    A typical 12 volt, 100 watt solar panel is about 7 amps, x4 panels yields 28 amps.

    2.1 Kw Suntech 175 mono, Classic 200, Trace SW 4024 ( 15 years old  but brand new out of sealed factory box Jan. 2015), Bogart Tri-metric, 700 ah @24 volt AGM battery bank. Plenty of Baja Sea of Cortez sunshine.

  • timsim00timsim00 Registered Users Posts: 15 ✭✭
    Your MPPT controller will convert all the higher voltage to your batteries requirement while boosting the amperage. You will gain amperage as the controller does the conversion instead of losing the upper end of the voltage, and consequently amperage, as a PWM controller does. I'm sure the pros here can give a better detailed explanation of MPPT.  Search "MPPT" here for plenty of other threads on the subject.

    A typical 12 volt, 100 watt solar panel is about 7 amps, x4 panels yields 28 amps.
    Thank you @littleharbor2, my question is if I put the panels in series, and I am convinced I need more panels, but if I wire them in series, creating higher input current, doesn't the charge controller use that current for the batteries?
  • littleharbor2littleharbor2 Solar Expert Posts: 1,405 ✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2016 #7
    The batteries will take all the current while in bulk charge mode. Once the controller goes into absorb it will hold the voltage at a steady level while the amperage tapers down, As the batteries approach being fully charge the amperage accepted will decrease. Any additional amperage potential can be used by whatever loads you may be running. These are what's called opportunity loads. You can take advantage of this scenario by running certain loads in the afternoon when your batteries are near full or are in float mode (totally full).


     If you decide you need more panels you are going to need a larger capacity controller, or another separate controller. You need to add panels two at a time if you are going to add the same panels. 600 watts will likely push beyond your controllers amperage limit, it's close and being you really rarely get nameplate output you may be fine. Some MPPT controllers will simply limit any input power and charge at their maximum rated amperage. I'm not sure about the Renogy controllers as they are on the lower end of the MPPT charge controller world. If you do go with 3 strings of panels into your one controller you will need to fuse each string. A fused combiner box is the best way to do this.


    I hope this makes sense to you. My first cup of coffee hasn't quite kicked in yet.

    2.1 Kw Suntech 175 mono, Classic 200, Trace SW 4024 ( 15 years old  but brand new out of sealed factory box Jan. 2015), Bogart Tri-metric, 700 ah @24 volt AGM battery bank. Plenty of Baja Sea of Cortez sunshine.

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