A workable idea for an off-grid Airconditioner?

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  • BrockBrock ✭✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 633 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: A workable idea for an off-grid Airconditioner?

    I agree totally worth it, even if the sump heater has to run a bunch, still way more efficient than just about everything else.

    And yes Bill I have heard that shutting them off and turning them back on right before use isn't a good idea, especially in cooler weather. Our contractor said some units just won't run for a certain amount of time, some will run but at reduced efficiency and some have larger heaters that can heat up quickly and are also used for defrosting. To be honest I don't know which ours is, but I can run our totally off solar so I am fine with it :)
    3kw solar PV, 8 L16's, xw 5548, Honda eu2000i, iota DLS-54-13, Leaf EV, 4 ton horizontal geothermal, grid tied - Green Bay, WI
  • Blackcherry04Blackcherry04 ✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 2,490 ✭✭✭
    Re: A workable idea for an off-grid Airconditioner?

    One observation from the Sanyo Forums is that the older ( pre 2008 ?? ) that use F22 and the newer systems that use 401A seem to be different animals. I don't know what all changed with the refrigerant change, ie different compressor, controller etc. Just saying that the watt draw and behavior might be different.

    I know in my house I up-graded last year, went from a 4 ton to a 3 ton and it's much better, not just in power consumption, but in comfort and performance. The cool is colder and the heat is hotter.
  • chevensteinchevenstein ✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 100 ✭✭
    Re: A workable idea for an off-grid Airconditioner?

    My system works pretty well: It doesn't use any electricity and doesn't cost anything to install, though if I had started with nothing it would have taken about 80 years to get it where it is today. As a bonus when components fail I can reuse them with the heating system!

    I built my house in a dense forest of tall oaks and left them standing pretty close to the house. We get shade almost all day and none of the windows get direct sun in the summer. Last summer the interior temp did not go above 79 degrees when the exterior approached 90 and the temperatures in town down the hill were in the high 90s. It doesn't do anything for the humidity, but that never really bothered me.

    Disclaimer: I've lived in south Florida and spent time in Kansas in July and will concede that this method might not work so well in those situations. Also, we''ve got miles of dense uninterrupted trees around the house on all sides, so it's probably a bit cooler at the ground than if we just had a few shade trees.
  • XRingerXRinger ✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 529 ✭✭✭
    Re: A workable idea for an off-grid Airconditioner?

    Build in a "a dense forest of tall oaks"?

    I could be wrong, but I think what the OP meant by "A workable idea for an off-grid Air conditioner",
    was something practical & affordable.
    Not something that only 0.0002 percent of the population might be able to do.

    High humidity? I would have to get a new wife for that environment. :p
    Cutting and burning wood in the winter? Have to get a younger wife too. :D
  • techntrektechntrek ✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 1,372 ✭✭✭
    Re: A workable idea for an off-grid Airconditioner?

    I have a similar deal with good forest in all directions, when it is 102 in the city its only 92 at my house, so usually its cooler than that most of the summer. Still need to do something about the humidity, though, so A/C is required.

    I haven't converted to the mini-splits yet (but will soon), so last winter I flipped off the breaker to my A/C compressor to hopefully save some $ on the crankcase heater. I finally flipped it back on yesterday so we can use it today. BTW, I never saw a drop in my average useage, so I don't know if I saved anything by doing that.
    4.5 kw APC UPS powered by a Prius, 12 kw Generac, Honda EU3000is
  • XRingerXRinger ✭✭✭ Solar Expert Posts: 529 ✭✭✭
    Re: A workable idea for an off-grid Airconditioner?

    I've noticed that some of the smaller Sanyo mini-splits do not have
    a crankcase heater. (Like the CH1872)
    http://www.ajmadison.com/cgi-bin/ajmadison/18KHS72.html

    So, if you can run a smaller unit or maybe run two smaller units..?.
    And not have that continuous 50-70w parasitic heater load.

    I assume there will still be a controller load of a few watts.
    But using the breaker would do that no harm.
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