Solar Opinions??

Options
54d18
54d18 Solar Expert Posts: 81 ✭✭✭
Does anyone have any comments on a manufacturer
by the name of Trina Solar?

Also, I've heard of Kyocera, but are they any good?

How about Sharp?

Still Shopping...Just doing some homework

Comments

  • BB.
    BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 33,477 admin
    Options
    Re: Solar Opinions??

    Kyocera and Sharp are good manufacturers. Kyocera had a problem with panels they made quite a few years ago and did a very good job replacing the panels when they found out they went bad (even replaced whole arrays when a few panels went bad).

    I don't know anything about the other brand.

    You can put this into Google and find some threads that talk about Trina a bit:
    • Trina site:wind-sun.com
    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • System2
    System2 Posts: 6,290 admin
    Options
    Re: Solar Opinions??

    Trina is a very good company and product.
  • johnl
    johnl Solar Expert Posts: 30
    Options
    Re: Solar Opinions??
    54d18 wrote: »
    Does anyone have any comments on a manufacturer
    by the name of Trina Solar?

    Also, I've heard of Kyocera, but are they any good?

    How about Sharp?

    Still Shopping...Just doing some homework

    Good to see another Northerner on this site (I'm in T Bay). I'm getting ready to purchase 10kw of panels for a microFIT project (likely REC, Yingli, or Trina) from the US, and have them shipped to the nearest convenient place to pick them up on the US side of the border. The cost seems to be about half that of any supplier on this side of the border. If you are just looking for an online vendor on this side of the border, try http://www.theresourcestore.ca/ (from St. Thomas, near London).

    The big Chinese module companies are Trina, Yingli, SunTech, Canadian Solar, China Sunergy, and Solarfun. All are supposed to have decent product with decent warranty. It seems that the vast majority of PV panel production will be based in China within the next few years.

    From other parts of the world, reputable manufacturers include (in no particular order): Sanyo, Kyocera, Sharp, REC, Evergreen, Mitsubishi, SunPower, Schott, Solon, Andalay, and BP (and many others).

    If you haven't already looked too much into the tech, you'll find that there's a few different types of PV panels - namely mono-crystalline, poly-crystalline (aka multi-crystalline), and thin-film. Either of the crystalline types are pretty good and have a long track record. The thin-film stuff (available from companies like DuPont, UniSolar, Kaneka) is newer and has less of a long-term performance record. Thin film is generally less expensive per watt up front, but requires more space for the same amount of watts (not a problem if you have extra acres of land where the panels can go, but tricky if you have a limited amount of roof space for mounting your panels).

    Right now one of the key questions is whether the manufacturer of your panels will be in business in 10 or 15 years to honor the warranty. Some of these companies are currently in dire financial situations and may not be around. Others are large conglomerates where solar is just one of many business lines.

    Of course other important factors include price per watt, compatibility with your selected inverters or charge controllers, and how many panels or how much area will be required for the amount of power you require.