Micro Inverter for single Kyocera KD 130

CraigCraig Registered Users Posts: 5
Am looking for a solution to power a small circulator off-grid. Currently have 1 old KD-130 panel. The circulator only needs to run when there is good light.

The circulator is 25 watts (Grundfos), 120 volts AC (an inductive load)

The panel is 12 volt (36 cell) http://www.kyocerasolar.com/assets/001/5186.pdf

Am not finding available inverters that will work for this panel. Many are 240 volt which can be resolved with a transformer. But not finding inverter that will take the lower voltage from this particular panel. Would prefer not to buy another/additional panel.

Any suggestions?

Comments

  • solar_davesolar_dave Solar Expert Posts: 2,337 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Micro Inverter for single Kyocera KD 130

    First of all, micro inverters are designed for Grid tie use. They will not fire up without an attachment to the grid and that takes permits and a design usually.
  • RybrenRybren Solar Expert Posts: 348
    Re: Micro Inverter for single Kyocera KD 130

    While there MIGHT be a way around it, you'll generally need to hook the panel to a battery and then run your inverter off of the battery. You MAY be able to get away without using a charge controller, but a small PWM controller is pretty cheap.
  • CariboocootCariboocoot Banned Posts: 17,615 ✭✭
    Re: Micro Inverter for single Kyocera KD 130

    Welcome to the forum Craig.

    As solar_dave said the grid-tie inverters do not run without grid. To power your pump from the panel will require a battery-based system, including inverter and charge controller. Is it worth the investment? Probably not.

    If you've got grid run it from the grid. If you haven't, adapt to whatever power system you've got. This may include changing the pump for a DC unit that can do the same job (no inverter required, but likely will still need a battery).

    The good news is that a 25 Watt load that only needs to be powered during daylight hours would not require a large battery (100-150 Watt hours of use) or a large inverter and the 130 Watt panel should handle it with no problem.

    In essence:
    130 Watt panel with a 10 Amp SunSaver controller (about $50) charging a 50 Amp hour 12 Volt battery (about $100 for an AGM type) running a small sine wave 150 Watt inverter (about $115 for a Samlex). So <$200 for the additional equipment. Compare that with your other options.
  • CraigCraig Registered Users Posts: 5
    Re: Micro Inverter for single Kyocera KD 130
    Rybren wrote: »
    While there MIGHT be a way around it, you'll generally need to hook the panel to a battery and then run your inverter off of the battery. You MAY be able to get away without using a charge controller, but a small PWM controller is pretty cheap.

    That does seem the most likely route. Any good inverter for off battery use?

    More about application: The circulator is for solar hot water panels. The problem is that power outage is frequent (low priority grid area). When this happens the water boils off. So each fall have to drain and add appropriate anti-freeze. This is a nusance and $40 each year(need protection to -30 F). Otherwise the system runs great.

    Since I have a panel, it would seem that: [ Solar --> battery --> inverter --> pump ] would be a fine solution. But if the inverter is not good quality, then its failure will put me in worse situation than the power company is. Then there is insert a relay between inverter to pump from grid when inverter is failing ...
  • CraigCraig Registered Users Posts: 5
    Re: Micro Inverter for single Kyocera KD 130
    130 Watt panel with a 10 Amp SunSaver controller (about $50) charging a 50 Amp hour 12 Volt battery (about $100 for an AGM type) running a small sine wave 150 Watt inverter (about $115 for a Samlex). So <$200 for the additional equipment. Compare that with your other options.

    What type of inverter would handle inductive load? Woops ... you answered sine wave.

    Any that are built for many hours of use? Unless it is solid, breakdown maintenance is problematic.

    Otherwise $200+ isn't bad to solve the problem ... and a few bucks / month electricity savings.
  • peakbaggerpeakbagger Solar Expert Posts: 341 ✭✭✭
    Re: Micro Inverter for single Kyocera KD 130

    The alternative is buy a DC circulator pump. I have one on my SHW system and its been running for 10 plus years
  • CraigCraig Registered Users Posts: 5
    Re: Micro Inverter for single Kyocera KD 130
    peakbagger wrote: »
    The alternative is buy a DC circulator pump. I have one on my SHW system and its been running for 10 plus years

    What make and model is your pump? I'll look up the specs and see if it usable. At the time I put my system in, reports from DC pumps were mixed - either weak, brush life issues, or wouldn't pump if water got too hot. So went with a more 'industrial' solution ... otherwise, DC would have been spot on. I'm in Northern NY so we have similar weather.
  • peakbaggerpeakbagger Solar Expert Posts: 341 ✭✭✭
    Re: Micro Inverter for single Kyocera KD 130

    Its a March R8 fed from a 48 watt siemens panel. It worked without a controller but I ended up installing a ARTECH DC controller to optimize the heat out of the panels as there were times in the morning and the afternoon when the panels were cooler than the tank but there was enough sun to run the pump. I have a long pipe run and it gets quite cold in the winter if its much below zero, the viscosity of the glycol gets high enough that the pump deadheads for hours at a time with no apparent damage. I have flat plate panels and not sure how well the pump would work with evacuated tubes that run hotter.
  • stephendvstephendv Solar Expert Posts: 1,571 ✭✭
    Re: Micro Inverter for single Kyocera KD 130

    This is a DC pump rated for 8v-24v designed for hot water and direct solar connection, high reliability and pricey: upwards of $180 http://www.lowara.com/lowdata/doc/EN/ecocircd5solar-ed-en.pdf
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