Remote off grid cabin system

mryimmersmryimmers Solar Expert Posts: 115 ✭✭✭
Hi everyone, first time posting, though I've been creeping around here awhile,and I'm looking for opinions on putting together a solar system for my off grid cabin. I think this site and Midnite Solar's are about the most informative ones I've come across. I currently run everything off of my Yamaha EF2400iS. Once I started to research the subject I realized how complex a topic it can be (huge understatement). What I read over and over was that first I must know my loads, so I got a Kill-A-Watt meter and began to track my power use. I separated my larger loads- electric kettle, toaster and microwave, as I don't expect to run those items on my solar system. My main loads are TV, satellite receiver, stereo, lights and a couple other small items. The period of time I tracked my loads ran from Feb 16th- July 28th, a total of 162 days. In that time I was at the cabin on 55 days. In that 55 days we used a total of 14.05 KWH, an average of .255 KWH per day. In that 55 days there were 9 days that we stayed overnight. Overnight stays averaged .72 KWH. My work schedule has me out of town 14 days at a time followed by 14 days off, so there is usually no one there for 2 weeks at a time, and when I'm home I go there often. I'm kind of struggling trying to figure out how to size the system as it sees intermittent use year round, but not really very large power needs. I have read here many times that loads tend to grow, what I see happening in my case is that the cabin may be used more often, but with similar loads as now. I am near Thunder Bay Ontario, Canada. PVWATTS says I get average 4.62 solar radiation for the year. Thank you for your input!!
510 watt pv, TS-MPPT 60, Exeltech XP1100, XP600 & XP250 @ 24V, 4x Trojan 105RE, Trimetric 2030, Yamaha EF2400i gen.

Comments

  • BB.BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 32,006 admin
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    Welcome to the forum mryimmers.

    Great! You did all of the ground work and your power requirements are relatively small... A "small" system being under ~1 kWH (1,000 WH) per day... If you decided to run a refrigerator (plus other loads), you should probably aim at ~3.3 kWH per day.

    This is my general starting point for a system design. I will pick ~1kWH per day as a starting point (enough power for a off grid cabin with some lighting, laptop, electronics, water pump).

    Battery size--1-3 days of power storage with 50% maximum discharge. 2 days with 50% discharge is a good start. I will do a 12 volt battery system--But if you think you are going to grow, you may want to start with 24 volt system.
    • 1,000 WH * 1/0.85 AC inverter eff * 2 days storage * 1/0.50 max discharge * 1/12 volt = 392 AH @ 12 volt battery bank

    4 x 6 volt * 220 AH "golf cart" batteries will give you a 12 volt 440 AH battery bank (2 batteries in series, then two strings in parallel).

    For charging I would recommend nominally 5% to 13% rate of charge. A solar array would be in the range of:
    • 440 AH * 14.5 volts charging * 1/0.77 panel+controller deratings * 0.05 rate of charge = 414 Watt array minimum
    • 440 AH * 14.5 volts charging * 1/0.77 panel+controller deratings * 0.10 rate of charge = 829 Watt array nominal
    • 440 AH * 14.5 volts charging * 1/0.77 panel+controller deratings * 0.13 rate of charge = 1,077 Watt array "cost effective maximum"

    PV Watts for Thunder Bay ON, fixed array tilted (from horizontal) to Latitude:
    Month    Solar Radiation (kWh/m2/day)
    1      3.80     
    2      4.83     
    3      5.58     
    4      5.41     
    5      5.57     
    6      5.41     
    7      5.64     
    8      5.14     
    9      4.69     
    10      3.47     
    11      2.89     
    12      3.03     
    Year      4.62      
    

    As an estimate, I toss the "bottom" three months of solar production and pick the 4th month as the solar "break even" month. That would be 3.8 hours of sun for January. The "break even array" would be:
    • 1,000 WH per day * 1/0.52 end to end system eff * 1/3.8 hours of sun = 506 Watt Array

    So--That would suggest that the "ideal array" for a 1,000 WH per day system in your region would be around 506 to 1,077 Watts--And a nice sized array for daily use would ~829 watts (anything within ~10% is "close enough" for solar).

    If you get lots of snow, and will be using the cabin in the winter--Then you might look at a tilting solar array that can go near vertical in the winter... It will shed snow better and pick up reflected light from a snow field in front of the array.

    Assuming your AC loads are "small"--I would suggest this Morningstar 300 Watt 12 volt TSW AC inverter--It is about the best "small" inverter out there (price/performance/options including "low power search mode", remote on/off, etc.).

    If you are mostly one overnight--You might try with a 5% / 414 watt array--You could add more panels later (longer stays, find out you need more power). Remember your arrays need to have full sun/free of any shading/shadows between ~9am to 3pm. Even small shadows can dramatically reduce the output of your solar array.

    Your thoughts?

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • mryimmersmryimmers Solar Expert Posts: 115 ✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    Hi Bill, thanks for the quick reply!!! I think shooting for 1KWH sounds like a good place to start as it leaves me a little growing room. Since I'm starting from scratch I am leaning towards 24V as that will "future proof" the system a bit? Your suggestion of 4 6V GC batteries would allow that anyway.

    Awhile ago when I did some calculations I came up with a bank of [email protected] 24V, (4x L16 type?) I think I was being too conservative in my calculations though. I've built an adjustable rack that can hold 4 panels like this one:http://www.solar-electric.com/solarworld-sunmodule-sw250-monocrystalline-solar-panel.html. So there I'm good for 1000 watts of panel.

    I can put the panels near vertical in winter as you suggest. We go there often in the winter, but it does sit idle for a couple weeks at a time so keeping the snow off of them would be important. I have a cheap 12V 1000w pure sine inverter that I could use to start, but I don't want to build a system around it. In an effort to keep the initial cost down I guess I could wire the batteries for 12V to use that inverter, and replace it with a real one later on?

    Looking at what you are telling me I think I'm somewhat on the right track. I have to thank all you contributors on this forum, because that's where I got the info!! thanks
    510 watt pv, TS-MPPT 60, Exeltech XP1100, XP600 & XP250 @ 24V, 4x Trojan 105RE, Trimetric 2030, Yamaha EF2400i gen.
  • BB.BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 32,006 admin
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system
    mryimmers wrote: »
    Hi Bill, thanks for the quick reply!!! I think shooting for 1KWH sounds like a good place to start as it leaves me a little growing room. Since I'm starting from scratch I am leaning towards 24V as that will "future proof" the system a bit? Your suggestion of 4 6V GC batteries would allow that anyway.

    It really depends on what the future holds... The Morning Star is such a nice 300 Watt (600 watts for 10 minute surge) with low power/search modes that you just do not see on any other "small" AC inverter... If your loads fit in its output range--That is one reason I would stay with a 12 volt system (for now).

    "Golf Cart" type batteries are pretty rugged and will last you ~3-5 years or so. If you can see the future as being satisfied with 4x 6 volt @ 220 AH Golf Cart type batteries--I would then not look for a larger system at this time.
    Awhile ago when I did some calculations I came up with a bank of [email protected] 24V, (4x L16 type?) I think I was being too conservative in my calculations though. I've built an adjustable rack that can hold 4 panels like this one:http://www.solar-electric.com/solarworld-sunmodule-sw250-monocrystalline-solar-panel.html. So there I'm good for 1000 watts of panel.

    With 24 volt @ 400 AH battery bank--You are looking at a bank that is 2x larger than the ~440 AH @ 12 volt I suggested for the "12 volt" system. That would support (battery wise) roughly:
    • 400 AH * 24 volts * 0.85 inverter eff * 1/2 days of storage * 0.50 max discharge = 2,244 WH of 120 VAC power per day (nominal)

    That sort of puts you in a "mid point" of system design... If you need more power (computer, water pumping, entertainment electronics, etc.)--That is fine. If you plan on a full size Energy Star refrigerator (~1.0-1.5 kWH per day)--Then you really should be looking at closer to a ~3.3 kWH per day system (in my humble opinion)...

    Batteries age, and larger battery banks should have larger solar arrays to support them (more self discharge, ensure that the batteries are properly/quickly recharged, etc.). So--In general, I try to warn against going with an "excessively" large battery bank if you really do not have the energy needs at this time. And if your needs are 3+ years in the future--Then that is the time to look at going for the larger battery bank (24 volt inverter, new AC battery charger, possibly larger genset, etc.).

    Solar panels, charge controllers, etc. can (many times) be reconfigured from 12 to 24 volt systems (and charge controllers upgrading to 24 volt battery banks can handle 2x the maximum array size too). You should do several paper designs and see which meet your price/performance cost points. Also note that if you do plan on going to 24 volts "in the future", then picking the right hardware and buying in "pairs" (to rewire batteries/solar panels in parallel to series for high voltage/etc.) can help reduce costs/mixing old vs new hardware, etc.

    In general, it is "hard" to grow a solar power system... Too many things change, panels that were "cheap" this year are 2x as expensive 3 years down the road, etc...
    I can put the panels near vertical in winter as you suggest. We go there often in the winter, but it does sit idle for a couple weeks at a time so keeping the snow off of them would be important. I have a cheap 12V 1000w pure sine inverter that I could use to start, but I don't want to build a system around it. In an effort to keep the initial cost down I guess I could wire the batteries for 12V to use that inverter, and replace it with a real one later on?

    Yes, it is possible... Will you need any AC power when you are gone (keeping security system alive, sump pump, etc.)? The MorningStar 300 Watt inverter is great because it is, overall, a pretty efficient/low power unit.

    Larger inverters simply "waste" more power--If your loads are small and you have a "large" inverter (~6 watts tare load for MorningStar, ~10-20 watts for a "typical" 1-2 kW inverter), the larger inverters can force you to step up the battery/panel size:
    • 6 watts * 24 hours = 144 WH tare losses per day
    • 20 watts * 24 hours = 480 WH of tare losses per day

    At a 1,000 WH per day system, these higher losses can be significant.
    Looking at what you are telling me I think I'm somewhat on the right track. I have to thank all you contributors on this forum, because that's where I got the info!! thanks

    I think you are--Off grid solar, for smaller systems, is really all about running the conservation/efficiency race. The overall efficiency of a typical off grid solar power system (end to end--Solar panel marketing numbers to "useful" AC output) runs in the ~52% range. Just to run a 20 watt AC inverter tare losses on a 3.8 hour of sun per day:
    • 480 WH * 1/0.52 system efficiency * 1/3.8 hours of sun = 243 Watts of solar panel "extra" for "larger" inverter

    Most people, when the lock up and leave for days/weeks/months, usually leave the solar system connected and batteries near full charge--But make sure they turn off "ALL LOADS/AC INVERTERS/etc."... Things go wrong, bad weather, something (like an inverter and a pump) gets left on--And when the owner returns, they find a set of dead batteries when they return.

    For remote & seasonal homes/cabins--There is the "loss" factor (theft, vandals, etc.)--You may not want to leave too much "at risk" when you are away.

    Also, I would look at a genset too... Backup for bad weather, a skill saw, etc... In general, I like a small quiet genset (Honda eu2000i or Yamaha ~1.6-2.4 kW) inverter generators--They make a nice match for smaller off grid power systems to keep the batteries happy during stretches of bad weather and run the larger power tools when needed. Many off grid folks find that two gensets can be useful too--The small/quiet one and a second 3-5kW "noise maker" for larger tools/emergency backup.

    Anyway--I do not have the right answers--Just some questions and suggestions that you will have fit into your lifestyle/needs. Energy usage is a highly personal set of choices.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • mryimmersmryimmers Solar Expert Posts: 115 ✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system
    BB. wrote: »
    It really depends on what the future holds... The Morning Star is such a nice 300 Watt (600 watts for 10 minute surge) with low power/search modes that you just do not see on any other "small" AC inverter... If your loads fit in its output range--That is one reason I would stay with a 12 volt system (for now).

    "Golf Cart" type batteries are pretty rugged and will last you ~3-5 years or so. If you can see the future as being satisfied with 4x 6 volt @ 220 AH Golf Cart type batteries--I would then not look for a larger system at this time.



    With 24 volt @ 400 AH battery bank--You are looking at a bank that is 2x larger than the ~440 AH @ 12 volt I suggested for the "12 volt" system. That would support (battery wise) roughly:
    • 400 AH * 24 volts * 0.85 inverter eff * 1/2 days of storage * 0.50 max discharge = 2,244 WH of 120 VAC power per day (nominal)

    That sort of puts you in a "mid point" of system design... If you need more power (computer, water pumping, entertainment electronics, etc.)--That is fine. If you plan on a full size Energy Star refrigerator (~1.0-1.5 kWH per day)--Then you really should be looking at closer to a ~3.3 kWH per day system (in my humble opinion)...

    Batteries age, and larger battery banks should have larger solar arrays to support them (more self discharge, ensure that the batteries are properly/quickly recharged, etc.). So--In general, I try to warn against going with an "excessively" large battery bank if you really do not have the energy needs at this time. And if your needs are 3+ years in the future--Then that is the time to look at going for the larger battery bank (24 volt inverter, new AC battery charger, possibly larger genset, etc.).

    Solar panels, charge controllers, etc. can (many times) be reconfigured from 12 to 24 volt systems (and charge controllers upgrading to 24 volt battery banks can handle 2x the maximum array size too). You should do several paper designs and see which meet your price/performance cost points. Also note that if you do plan on going to 24 volts "in the future", then picking the right hardware and buying in "pairs" (to rewire batteries/solar panels in parallel to series for high voltage/etc.) can help reduce costs/mixing old vs new hardware, etc.

    In general, it is "hard" to grow a solar power system... Too many things change, panels that were "cheap" this year are 2x as expensive 3 years down the road, etc...



    Yes, it is possible... Will you need any AC power when you are gone (keeping security system alive, sump pump, etc.)? The MorningStar 300 Watt inverter is great because it is, overall, a pretty efficient/low power unit.

    Larger inverters simply "waste" more power--If your loads are small and you have a "large" inverter (~6 watts tare load for MorningStar, ~10-20 watts for a "typical" 1-2 kW inverter), the larger inverters can force you to step up the battery/panel size:
    • 6 watts * 24 hours = 144 WH tare losses per day
    • 20 watts * 24 hours = 480 WH of tare losses per day

    At a 1,000 WH per day system, these higher losses can be significant.



    I think you are--Off grid solar, for smaller systems, is really all about running the conservation/efficiency race. The overall efficiency of a typical off grid solar power system (end to end--Solar panel marketing numbers to "useful" AC output) runs in the ~52% range. Just to run a 20 watt AC inverter tare losses on a 3.8 hour of sun per day:
    • 480 WH * 1/0.52 system efficiency * 1/3.8 hours of sun = 243 Watts of solar panel "extra" for "larger" inverter

    Most people, when the lock up and leave for days/weeks/months, usually leave the solar system connected and batteries near full charge--But make sure they turn off "ALL LOADS/AC INVERTERS/etc."... Things go wrong, bad weather, something (like an inverter and a pump) gets left on--And when the owner returns, they find a set of dead batteries when they return.

    For remote & seasonal homes/cabins--There is the "loss" factor (theft, vandals, etc.)--You may not want to leave too much "at risk" when you are away.

    Also, I would look at a genset too... Backup for bad weather, a skill saw, etc... In general, I like a small quiet genset (Honda eu2000i or Yamaha ~1.6-2.4 kW) inverter generators--They make a nice match for smaller off grid power systems to keep the batteries happy during stretches of bad weather and run the larger power tools when needed. Many off grid folks find that two gensets can be useful too--The small/quiet one and a second 3-5kW "noise maker" for larger tools/emergency backup.

    Anyway--I do not have the right answers--Just some questions and suggestions that you will have fit into your lifestyle/needs. Energy usage is a highly personal set of choices.

    -Bill

    I"ve been thinking about that Bill, and I think you are right, most of the time my K-A-W meter is saying I'm only using around 110 watts or less, and I'm planning to run my generator for my larger loads anyway. I was thinking too big.
    510 watt pv, TS-MPPT 60, Exeltech XP1100, XP600 & XP250 @ 24V, 4x Trojan 105RE, Trimetric 2030, Yamaha EF2400i gen.
  • icarusicarus Solar Expert Posts: 5,433 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    Howdy Neighbour!

    We live on an island off grid. We have 400 watts of PV and routinely use 5-800 WH of power, using propane for the fridge. I would double the system, and use a conventional fridge if I we doing it over again. The only time we have to routinely run a genny is between Nov and mid Feb, depending on the weather. Other than that, perhaps once a month for an hour or two.

    welcome, and keep in touch,

    tony

    PS Where are you actually?

    t
  • mryimmersmryimmers Solar Expert Posts: 115 ✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    Hi Tony, thanks for the reply! You must be doing well in that "conservation/ efficiency race" that Bill mentioned. His comments have had me thinking that I probably actually need a smaller system than I thought. I really don't see ever running a fridge as the cabin is not far from where I live and we just use coolers. Do you like that morningstar ts 300 inverter? How about the rouge 3024? There does not seem to be a lot of choices in the " medium sized" charge controllers is there? So you find that your 400 watts of panels keeps up with your needs OK? I'm located about 1/2 an hour west of Thunder Bay. You must be in the Atikokan / Quetico Park area?
    510 watt pv, TS-MPPT 60, Exeltech XP1100, XP600 & XP250 @ 24V, 4x Trojan 105RE, Trimetric 2030, Yamaha EF2400i gen.
  • icarusicarus Solar Expert Posts: 5,433 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    First,

    I love the Suresine. I did have one fail after about 5 years for no apparent reason, but I would certainly buy another. (I am currently running a replacement Suresine. I do wish they would make a 600-1200 watt version so I could run a fridge.

    As for the Rogue, I am very happy as well. Mine has been up and running for about 4 years (at least) Marc has come up with a new version. I like the display, and the ability to change parameters easily.

    We are not quite to Atikokan, and a few dozen clicks north of HWY 11. We have 400 watts of PV and routinely draw about 5-800 Wh/day. That includes 2 lap tops, 2 I pads, a rocket hub, 3-5 lights (4-8 watt LEDs). We also have a radio, and an Internet radio or I pod going much of the day. No TV or Sat box however. We pump water directly from the lake with a shurflo submersible, it draws 7 Amps (12 vdc) and runs perhaps 15 minutes per day. We also have a couple of paddle fans the use to cool in the summer, and sometimes in the winter. The big extravagance is the 125 watt bed warmer! We run it for about 1/2 hour when it is really cold, and then turn it off.

    Seldom do we have to run a genny to charge. I will run a genny in the shop when I use big tools. We hve 4 T105s, 450 ah of power. On an average day we may get down to 85% SoC, and (~75 ah down). The PV gets full sun right after sunrise year round, and by 1 hour past sunrise it pouring in ~15-20 amps. We do begin to go in shadow by about 2:30 but in the winter we can see 5 amols until a hour before sunset simply from the reflection. Interestingly enough, we get better late afternoon harvest in the summertime. On a cloudy day because the clouds scatter the lit enough that we can get 2-3 amps with no direct sun. Not a lot of power, but enough to off set the late afternoon kitchen lights and radio.

    Good luck and keep in touch,

    Tony

    PS ordering stuff from NAWS and hving it delivered to Rydens in Grand Portqge works quit well. When my inverter quit, I had one over nighted from NAWS to . Coincidentally I had a friend driving up the shore, who picked it up and I got it a little over 24 hours after I ordered it! pretty good for life in the bush! I haven't dealt with any of the TBay solar guys, but I have dealt with Fred at NorthernLights solar in Atikokan for some stuff over the years.

    T
  • mryimmersmryimmers Solar Expert Posts: 115 ✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    I think you guys have convinced me on the suresine 300, the rogue 3024 looks like a good solid unit as well. What do you use as over-current protection? I like the look of the mid nite solar E-panels, nice clean installation. Do you use lightening protection? Some pics I see show 3-4 SPDs installed, is this over-kill? I guess thats one of those things that don't matter until you get smoked eh? haha. I regularly have stuff sent to Rydens, that works very well, and will probably go that route as the local guys are just too expensive.
    510 watt pv, TS-MPPT 60, Exeltech XP1100, XP600 & XP250 @ 24V, 4x Trojan 105RE, Trimetric 2030, Yamaha EF2400i gen.
  • BB.BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 32,006 admin
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    It appears from a small sample size, that the 120 VAC output of the AC inverter is what gets damaged from nearby lightning strikes (batteries are pretty good surge protectors). So, at a minimum, good quality surge suppressors on the AC inverter output is a good start.

    Given that the equipment is expensive and difficult to repair at remote sites/in emergency situations--Putting surge suppressors on the DC side and any communications lines that leave the building is probably a good investment if you live in a lightning prone area (and/or have wind turbines on towers, etc.).

    From our Working FAQ thread:
    BB. wrote: »
    A couple threads about Lightning:

    Off Grid Grounding Technique?
    Another Question, this time about Lightning

    Note, the above are discussions, not a do A, B, and C--and you will be "safe". There probably is no such thing with lightning. Several different techniques are discussed--and a few of those posters even have experience with lightning. :cool:

    And our host's consolidated FAQ page:

    www.windsun.com
    Lightning Protection for PV Systems

    From other past posts here, Windsun (now retired admin/owner of NAWS), he said that most of lighting induced failures he saw were in the Inverters' AC output section.

    Towards the end of this thread is a very nice discussion of proper generator grounding.

    -Bill

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • mryimmersmryimmers Solar Expert Posts: 115 ✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    Tony, since we live in the same winter climate I'm wondering where do you keep your batteries? I am currently building a small tool shed (unheated) and I was planning on putting the batteries in this shed in an insulated plywood box. The charge controller and inverter will live here too (not in the box). The array will be within about 15 or 20 feet from this shed. AC power will go to cabin about 50 feet away. I considered putting the system in the cabin, but cabin is small, and I didn't want any extra noise inside. Most of the time it is unheated too, so the batteries would not really be any better off in there any way. These days it doesn't seem to be getting as cold as it used to, and not for as long, so I'm thinking they will be ok? Also what do you use as a charger when you run your generator? thanks hh
    510 watt pv, TS-MPPT 60, Exeltech XP1100, XP600 & XP250 @ 24V, 4x Trojan 105RE, Trimetric 2030, Yamaha EF2400i gen.
  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Solar Expert Posts: 3,009 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system
    icarus wrote: »
    First,

    I love the Suresine. I did have one fail after about 5 years for no apparent reason, but I would certainly buy another. (I am currently running a replacement Suresine. I do wish they would make a 600-1200 watt version so I could run a fridge.


    T

    My thoughts exactly. I've had two running side by side for 5 years now and not a problem of any kind. I love them. Silent, powerful for any 300 watt inverter, no moving parts, pure sine, low self consumption, reliable.
    And I too wish Mrningstar would take that next step and expand their inverter selection. It SHOULD be very easy to expand on what they already have and I can't understand their stagnation in this regard. It boggles my mind, but they own Morningstar, not me.
  • icarusicarus Solar Expert Posts: 5,433 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    Sorry for the delay, I hve been on the road for the past week.

    The issue with cold batteries is simply that thier capacity decreases with temp, but their longevity increases. Just design the battery siaing for the expected load with the diminished capacity in the winter, if you are going to do big loads in the winter. My batteries are inside, but when I go away for a number of days or weeks in the winter, they slowly cool to ambient, then take days to warm back up. The don't suffer one bit as a result. As a matter of fact, I have one pair of T105s that are on a small outbuilding in seasonal service, that are now 14 years old and they have never been heated' and they still perform quite well.

    As for the charging, I use a Xantrex TrueCharge 20. I would probably use a Iota today, since the TC 20 is no longer available. Be careful with sizing the charger for both the battery size AND the genny size. I originally hand a TC 40 but it wouldn't run well on the EU 1000, even though it should have. (as someone noted, after I traded it out, you can trick the charger to start with low output, then it will switch to higher output and it would have worked fine) Pay attention to the inrush starting current and the PF correction of the charger.

    I don't do much for lighting protection, Vern thugh we have lots of lightning! I ground the array, and have a separate AC ground. he array grounds into the lake o a piece of #2 copper, (even though I have been advised that this is not a good idea, we hve had great success with doing so on buildings for 75 years!) The AC grounds to earth, even though we are mostly rock, so I have 100' of bare copper lying in the duff, tied to a ground rod partially buried in a pit. (we only have a few inches of soil, so the rod is in the diagonal)
  • mryimmersmryimmers Solar Expert Posts: 115 ✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    Tony, is there some place in our part of the world where you are getting your trojan t-105 batteries?
    510 watt pv, TS-MPPT 60, Exeltech XP1100, XP600 & XP250 @ 24V, 4x Trojan 105RE, Trimetric 2030, Yamaha EF2400i gen.
  • icarusicarus Solar Expert Posts: 5,433 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    I beleive I got my last set for Fred at Northern Lights Solar in Atikokan. I think that Mier Hardware on
    Simpson St, or I&M Electric on Squire St. can get them. You may also be able to order them from CT, or NAPA' or even, god forbid, Walmart.

    Tony
  • mryimmersmryimmers Solar Expert Posts: 115 ✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system

    Hi All,

    Well I've finally done it, I've ordered the parts for my system as follows:

    2 X Canadian Solar 255 watt Mono Solar Panels (CS6P-255M) - Vmp 30.5V, Imp 8.35A, Voc 37.7V, Isc 8.87A, going into a Midnite MNPV3, about 20 feet of #6 AWG teck cable (because I already had it laying around) going to the tool shed, which will house a Midnite 125 Amp mini disconnect box, a Rogue 3048 charge controller, a Morningstar Suresine 300 watt inverter, and a battery bank consisting of 4 Trojan T105RE wired for 12volts. Back up charging will be done with an Iota 45 amp, 12 volt charger.
    Any comments or concerns are greatly appreciated, and I want to thank all of you for your help on this topic,(Bill, your comments probably saved me a bundle!!!) and I am sure I will have more questions once I start to assemble the parts, thanks again!!! HH
    510 watt pv, TS-MPPT 60, Exeltech XP1100, XP600 & XP250 @ 24V, 4x Trojan 105RE, Trimetric 2030, Yamaha EF2400i gen.
  • ThomThom Solar Expert Posts: 196 ✭✭✭
    Re: Remote off grid cabin system
    mryimmers wrote: »
    Hi All,

    Well I've finally done it, I've ordered the parts for my system as follows:

    2 X Canadian Solar 255 watt Mono Solar Panels (CS6P-255M) - Vmp 30.5V, Imp 8.35A, Voc 37.7V, Isc 8.87A, going into a Midnite MNPV3, about 20 feet of #6 AWG teck cable (because I already had it laying around) going to the tool shed, which will house a Midnite 125 Amp mini disconnect box, a Rogue 3048 charge controller, a Morningstar Suresine 300 watt inverter, and a battery bank consisting of 4 Trojan T105RE wired for 12volts. Back up charging will be done with an Iota 45 amp, 12 volt charger.
    Any comments or concerns are greatly appreciated, and I want to thank all of you for your help on this topic,(Bill, your comments probably saved me a bundle!!!) and I am sure I will have more questions once I start to assemble the parts, thanks again!!! HH

    Looks like you copped his system to . Very happy with my copy . Would like a nice suresine some day . Good luck


    Thom
    Off grid since 1984. 430w of panel, 300w suresine , 4 gc batteries 12v system, Rogue mpt3024 charge controller , air breeze windmill, Mikita 2400w generator . Added [email protected] 100w panel with a midnight brat 
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