Gas Leak in Regulator for EU2000

northernernortherner Solar Expert Posts: 492 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
I ordered, received and installed a tri fuel kit for my EU2000 generator, from a company in the US (CMD). I installed the conversion kit and attempted to test the unit, and discovered a significant gas leak coming from a vent hole in the regulator, after turning on the propane. The regulator must be defective. It appears that this could potentially be a serious safety issue for this to happen.

I may try looking for a replacement regulator locally. Is the regulator relatively generic, or are they rated for a certain output pressure? I know of an RV regulator where the output pressure can be adjusted. Has anyone else ever encountered a similar problem? Of course the mounting system would likely have to be modified for a different unit.

Another problem was with gas leaking through the load block adjusting screw? I sealed that leak using teflon tape for gas, but that shouldn't be necessary. I'm thinking that an O ring or gasket was omitted?

Comments

  • northernernortherner Solar Expert Posts: 492 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Gas Leak in Regulator for EU2000

    It does say in the instructions that a primary regulator is/may be required at the fuel supply to ensure proper fuel supply pressures. I find that confusing as I thought the regulator takes the tank pressure, and reduces it to what the engine requires?

    I will be contacting the company tomorrow.

    I realize now that a propane tank requires a primary regulator as well, so it's my fault.
  • inetdoginetdog Solar Expert Posts: 3,123 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Gas Leak in Regulator for EU2000
    northerner wrote: »
    It does say in the instructions that a primary regulator is/may be required at the fuel supply to ensure proper fuel supply pressures. I find that confusing as I thought the regulator takes the tank pressure, and reduces it to what the engine requires?

    I will be contacting the company tomorrow.

    Often something that takes a high rate gas flow will be designed with a high pressure regulator at the storage tank feed gas at high pressure through a small feed pipe to a secondary regulator located right at the motor. Rather like running high voltage DC from the panels to an MPPT CC which converts that down to battery voltage. But they should also have specified the maximum input pressure of the built in regulator in the kit.

    The options for LPG are usually either:
    1. Single regulator at the tank feeding large diameter pipes at a pressure of about 11" of water (11" WC). A heating appliance designed for LPG will typically be able to take that input pressure at its control valve without a problem. This regulator can accept full tank pressure on the input side.
    2. High pressure (primary) regulator at the tank which reduces the pressure to 15 lbs per square inch (psi), followed by a low pressure (secondary) regulator at or near the utilization equipment, which reduces again to 11" WC.

    The first situation is the most common for stationary tanks, and is the type of regulator used with appliances designed for direct connection to an LPG tank.
    A third possibility for small stuff like a torch or heater to connect to a small bottle rather than a tank is that the manual (needle) valve itself is designed to work at full tank pressure.

    There is a good chance that the only regulator you have is a secondary regulator, which can be damaged by full tank pressure.

    (When I added an LPG dryer to my existing setup of one on-demand water heater and two furnaces, I had the choice of digging up the 3/4" pipe from tank to house and replacing it with 1" or putting in a primary regulator at the tank and two secondary regulators at the two places the gas line entered the house. Worked like a charm and cost a lot less.)
    PS: The propane company's installer carried all three types. Single regulator painted tank color, primary painted red and secondary painted green.
    SMA SB 3000, old BP panels.
  • northernernortherner Solar Expert Posts: 492 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Gas Leak in Regulator for EU2000
    inetdog wrote: »
    Often something that takes a high rate gas flow will be designed with a high pressure regulator at the storage tank feed gas at high pressure through a small feed pipe to a secondary regulator located right at the motor. Rather like running high voltage DC from the panels to an MPPT CC which converts that down to battery voltage. But they should also have specified the maximum input pressure of the built in regulator in the kit.

    The options for LPG are usually either:
    1. Single regulator at the tank feeding large diameter pipes at a pressure of about 11" of water (11" WC). A heating appliance designed for LPG will typically be able to take that input pressure at its control valve without a problem. This regulator can accept full tank pressure on the input side.
    2. High pressure (primary) regulator at the tank which reduces the pressure to 15 lbs per square inch (psi), followed by a low pressure (secondary) regulator at or near the utilization equipment, which reduces again to 11" WC.

    The first situation is the most common for stationary tanks, and is the type of regulator used with appliances designed for direct connection to an LPG tank.
    A third possibility for small stuff like a torch or heater to connect to a small bottle rather than a tank is that the manual (needle) valve itself is designed to work at full tank pressure.

    There is a good chance that the only regulator you have is a secondary regulator, which can be damaged by full tank pressure.

    (When I added an LPG dryer to my existing setup of one on-demand water heater and two furnaces, I had the choice of digging up the 3/4" pipe from tank to house and replacing it with 1" or putting in a primary regulator at the tank and two secondary regulators at the two places the gas line entered the house. Worked like a charm and cost a lot less.)
    PS: The propane company's installer carried all three types. Single regulator painted tank color, primary painted red and secondary painted green.

    I realize now that I need a primary regulator to bring the tank pressure down to between 11 and 14 inches. The secondary regulator that mounts on the generator is a Garretson, and it works by turning off and on the gas supply through a slight vacuum from the carburetor.

    Likely the diaphragm has been damaged. There are repair kits available on eBay, and the diaphragm can be replaced.
  • westbranchwestbranch Solar Expert Posts: 5,142 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Gas Leak in Regulator for EU2000

    Once you have the pressure numbers that the system operates, with your local Propane Distributor should be able to set you up with a good primary unit.
     
    KID #51B  4s 140W to 24V 900Ah C&D AGM
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    Cotek ST1500W 24V Inverter,OmniCharge 3024,
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  • northernernortherner Solar Expert Posts: 492 ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Gas Leak in Regulator for EU2000
    westbranch wrote: »
    Once you have the pressure numbers that the system operates, with your local Propane Distributor should be able to set you up with a good primary unit.

    Yes, the local propane distributor has regulators. I was there just yesterday for the tank hose. The input to the secondary regulator needs to be between 11 and 14 inches. Thanks for the responses!
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