how does wind work?

alkhaleejsolaralkhaleejsolar Registered Users Posts: 11
hi,need to know how does work,wind mil,as a charger ,12,,24,,,or as direct 220 ,plz inform

Comments

  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Solar Expert Posts: 3,009 ✭✭✭✭
    Re: how does wrok,wind,

    The small ones almost never work. The manufacturers and retailers will tell you wonderful stories, unfortunately you often find out too late, you spent money on a pretty flower in the sky that is otherwise useless.
  • BB.BB. Super Moderators, Administrators Posts: 32,212 admin
    Re: how does wrok,wind,

    A "simple" wind turbine system... Horizontal Wind Turbine drives an Alternator (very similar to car's alternator). Goes through a rectifier (diodes) to turn AC into DC power. That power goes through the wiring (and sometimes a switch that can short out the wind turbine to "stop" it for servicing/high winds by shorting the output of the alternator) to the battery bank.

    A "diversion" or "shunt" charge controller is attached to the battery bank and the controller's output is connected to a "dump" load--Usually a bunch of large power resistors (basically an electric heater). When the battery is charged, the charge controller turns on and dumps excess power to the resistor bank.

    A horizontal wind turbine generally will spin too fast in high winds if there is no electrical loading on the alternator--and will self destruct.

    A more advanced wind turbine power system (expensive) is to put a MPPT charge controller between the wind turbine and the battery bank. Just like for solar, a MPPT charge controller can act a bit like a "DC version of a Variable Transformer" (transformers only work for AC power). It allows the turbine RPM, voltage, current output to be optimized, while the MPPT charge controller then down converts the high voltage/low current from the wind turbine to the low voltage / high current needed to charge the battery bank. But normally, there will be a resistor load bank attached the the MPPT charge controller to help control the wind turbine speed when the battery is fully charged.

    For a 220 VAC 50 Hz--A small wind turbine system would just charge a battery bank, and you would use an Inverter to generate the 220 VAC output. There are different types of inverters--those can can supply local AC loads (off grid), or also those that can directly connect to the grid and turn your power meter backwards (Grid Tied or GT Inverter). And there are hybrid inverters that can do both.

    And there are pure GT Inverters with diversion loads that are used with larger wind turbines that can take power from the turbine and directly turn it into AC power that can send power to the AC grid (typical large wind turbine farms).

    With very large wind turbines, there are several different ways that they can send power to the grid (AC inverters, direct connect to grid with a synchronous alternator, etc.)--If you want to discuss that more.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • ggunnggunn Solar Expert Posts: 1,973 ✭✭✭
    Re: how does wrok,wind,
    BB. wrote: »
    A "simple" wind turbine system... Horizontal Wind Turbine drives an Alternator (very similar to car's alternator). Goes through a rectifier (diodes) to turn AC into DC power. That power goes through the wiring (and sometimes a switch that can short out the wind turbine to "stop" it for servicing/high winds by shorting the output of the alternator) to the battery bank.

    A "diversion" or "shunt" charge controller is attached to the battery bank and the controller's output is connected to a "dump" load--Usually a bunch of large power resistors (basically an electric heater). When the battery is charged, the charge controller turns on and dumps excess power to the resistor bank.

    A horizontal wind turbine generally will spin too fast in high winds if there is no electrical loading on the alternator--and will self destruct.
    That's some great video, worthy of Sam Peckinpah!
Sign In or Register to comment.