solar panels wirring

alkhaleejsolaralkhaleejsolar Posts: 11Registered Users
hi every one,newbie in this forum,also in solar

i need help,about wiring 7 panels,34 volt

can we use solars panles as ,direct ,ac,mean,not using battery and inverter

i know the solars panle are given dc volt

can we remove diode from solars,and use as ,ac,volt,

if we remove diode,its voltage will be known as ac,,

so ,if we wired 7 panles of 34 volt ,,150 watt
in series,,its become 238 volt 1050 watt,,,plz correct me,
if its correct,then can we operate from this 238 volt 1050 watt
,any of 500 watt 220 volt direct in day time,plz inform,

its my thinking ,may be i am wrong,,plz correct me,

Comments

  • inetdoginetdog Posts: 3,121Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: solar panels wirring
    hi every one,newbie in this forum,also in solar

    i need help,about wiring 7 panels,34 volt

    can we use solars panles as ,direct ,ac,mean,not using battery and inverter

    i know the solars panle are given dc volt

    can we remove diode from solars,and use as ,ac,volt,


    its my thinking ,may be i am wrong,,plz correct me,

    You are very wrong.
    A diode can be used to convert AC to DC. But when the source itself is DC, all a diode does is allow the DC to flow in one direction only. Removing the diode will not make the DC into AC.

    Your panels will produce DC whether there is diode there or not, and nothing you can do will change that. The job of an inverter is to take DC input and make an AC output. As you could see by looking inside one, it takes a lot of circuitry to do this.

    Also, running any type of load (except for a very few loads like a pump designed for that use) directly from the panels is not practical. Even if the load can use DC.

    Unfortunately, you are missing all of the basic education about electricity and we can not hope to teach it to you here. You should try to find local help or go through an online course on the subject.
    SMA SB 3000, old BP panels.
  • BB.BB. Posts: 27,933Super Moderators, Administrators admin
    Re: solar panels wirring

    No--You need some sort of AC Inverter... In its most basic form, an AC inverter is an "H Bridge" switching circuit. Hook up +/- 12 volts for 1/2 a cycle, then switch the wires to -/+ volts the other 1/2 cycle. Do that 50 or 60 times a second, and you have a 12 volt AC Square Wave. Put a 12 volt to 240 volt transformer on the output put, you have a 240 volt AC square wave output.

    H bridge
    - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Now, the reality is that square wave AC is not very good AC---The utility power we use is a Sine Wave--Square waves have lots of issues with driving circuits designed for Sine Wave voltage and current flow.

    Next, There are two major types of AC inverters... There are the typical Off Grid Style which use a Battery to supply DC power and output AC power (use solar, generator, utility power to recharge the battery bank). And there is Grid Tied Solar--Basically solar panels drive power to the GT Inverter which then takes the available power from the solar array and drives it out the AC wiring to the utility grid (can spin your utility meter backwards) and also power your local loads (very much like a car generator charges the car's battery and runs the radio and head lights).

    There are variations of the above--But you really need to know your needs and understand what the specialty product can do for you.

    For example, there are a few special inverters called Variable Frequency Drives. They can take AC (sometimes DC from batteries/solar panels) and turn it into 3 phase AC power to drive well pumps (an example).

    Note that solar panels are not really "solar batteries" in the traditional sense that most people understand (a battery is a constant voltage source that can output large amounts of current, stored energy, when needed on demand).

    Solar panels are, for the most part, current sources who's output current is dependent on the amount of sun falling on the solar panel at any second in time. This means, that sometimes you may get 12 volts at 1 amp (12 watts) or 12 volts at 10 amps (100 watts) depending on the sun, and the ability of the load to absorb/use variable current from the solar array.

    Imagine a car engine that only developed as much power as it was sunny... Sometimes you can go down the highway at 100 kph, and other times, 10 kph, and 2/3'rds of the day, 0 kph. And when there was a hill--you could only climb that hill on a bright and sunny day.

    With a battery bank, you now have stored energy and you can operate the vehicle when you need it. And replace the stored energy in the battery bank from a solar array/backup generator/etc...

    So--Back to your question, I usually find it much more useful to understand your needs (loads volts/amps/watts/VA/hours per day/emergency backup vs daily load, seasonal loads, etc.), where at, why solar and not some other power source, etc.) to help guide you towards something that will better meet your needs.

    Solar can be a complex world to get dumped into and asking broad questions that have no simple/direct answers. If we focus on your load, then we can talk about solutions that have a direct requirement--And it should be easier starting point for learning.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • alkhaleejsolaralkhaleejsolar Posts: 11Registered Users
    Re: solar panels wirring

    nice reply,,thanks,sir,,u mean, if we remove diods ,its still give dc volt,,????plz explain,
  • PhotowhitPhotowhit Posts: 4,709Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: solar panels wirring

    ..........yes.........
    Home system 4000 watt (Evergreen) array standing, with 2 Midnite Classic Lites,  Midnite E-panel, Prosine 1800 and Exeltech 1100, ForkLift battery. Off grid for @13 of last 14 years. 1000 watts being added to current CC, @2700 watts to be added with an additional CC.
  • BB.BB. Posts: 27,933Super Moderators, Administrators admin
    Re: solar panels wirring

    I assume you are somewhere in/around Saudi Arabia--So there might be a little language issue too (me--I barely know my own language, English, that is probably why a became an Engineer--don't have to talk too much :blush:).

    Anyway, interestingly, solar cells are actually just "giant" diodes that happened to be optimized for producing electricity from the sun. You can take an LED and shine sunlight on it and get a little bit of current too.

    The diodes used with solar panels are there to "protect" the big solar cells (solar diodes) from being damaged by too much voltage from panels around it (say you have a string of 10 panels and shade one, the shaded panel will get too much voltage from the other panels in the series string--The by pass diodes simply allow the current to bypass the "dark" cells instead of damaging them). There are also blocking diodes that can be used to stop a battery bank from discharging back into a solar array during the night (solar cells are not very good at being "diodes" electrical wise).

    Normally, you do not need to worry about the bypass and blocking diodes in the solar panel... The Manufacturer puts them in to protect their panels during normal operation. And if you removed them, it would not change the way the solar cells/panels/arrays work--It would just make them easier to damage (with shading, etc.).

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • alkhaleejsolaralkhaleejsolar Posts: 11Registered Users
    Re: solar panels wirring

    thats good support,thanks,,sir now i am satisfied,,thxxxxxxxx
  • BB.BB. Posts: 27,933Super Moderators, Administrators admin
    Re: solar panels wirring

    Imagine you have a 3 cell flash light. When everything is working, each battery adds voltage and supports the current flow through each battery.

    If you had one battery fail (no voltage output), it would also block current flow. If you put a "reverse biased" diode across the failed battery, the other two batteries would force current through the bypass diode and now you would get 3 volts from the two batteries at the light bulb (instead of 4.5 volts volts for 1.5 volt carbon/alkaline battery cells).

    More or less, that is what the bypass diodes do--If one solar panels (or a few cells) have no sunlight, they go "high resistance". The bypass diodes let current around the "dark" part of the solar array... More or less, if there is more than ~12 volts of "reverse current" across a dark solar cell, it will be ruined (same as over voltaging a standard diode with too much reverse voltage).

    In a flash light, you just throw the 3 batteries away and put in 3 new batteries. Obviously, you cannot do that with a solar array--replace it every time a bird lands on the array or somebody walks in front of it. The diodes are for protection, they do not do change the output behavior in any way. The solar array is still a DC Current Source.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • alkhaleejsolaralkhaleejsolar Posts: 11Registered Users
    Re: solar panels wirring

    too much happy to find very important ,knowledge,,thanks,,sir,,wish u best of luck,

    see u with a different topic in solar,,thanks,
  • BB.BB. Posts: 27,933Super Moderators, Administrators admin
    Re: solar panels wirring

    You are very welcome... Feel free to ask questions any time.

    We are all volunteers here and started in the same place you did (new to the world and no knowledge).

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • isakshisinghalisakshisinghal Posts: 5Registered Users ✭✭
    BB. said:
    Re: solar panels wirring

    Imagine you have a 3 cell flash light. When everything is working, each battery adds voltage and supports the current flow through each battery.

    If you had one battery fail (no voltage output), it would also block current flow. If you put a "reverse biased" diode across the failed battery, the other two batteries would force current through the bypass diode and now you would get 3 volts from the two batteries at the light bulb (instead of 4.5 volts volts for 1.5 volt carbon/alkaline battery cells).

    More or less, that is what the bypass diodes do--If one solar panels (or a few cells) have no sunlight, they go "high resistance". The bypass diodes let current around the "dark" part of the solar array... More or less, if there is more than ~12 volts of "reverse current" across a dark solar cell, it will be ruined (same as over voltaging a standard diode with too much reverse voltage).

    In a flash light, you just throw the 3 batteries away and put in 3 new batteries. Obviously, you cannot do that with a solar array--replace it every time a bird lands on the array or somebody walks in front of it. The diodes are for protection, they do not do change the output behavior in any way. The solar array is still a DC Current Source.

    -Bill
    Thank you for the explanation. My answer is a bit off topic. Actually I was writing a paper for my class and wanted to know the specification and this thread really helped me to do that. Thank you so much Sir for sharing such valuable information and example about solar panels. :smile:

    Sakshi Zolt
    Researcher, Working as a  solar panels for home Consultant
Sign In or Register to comment.