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  • Shurflo Pump?

    Interested in using this for my off grid cabin - does anyone know which would be best? have 1500gal tank that we use for rainwater harvesting - need decent pressure to the cabin / garden

  • #2

    Re: Shurflo Pump?

    Re: Shurflo Pump?

    So no need for lift, just pressurizing lines? What power do you have available? They make 12 VDC, 24 VDC, and 120 VAC models. The basic 12 Volt is a little over $100.

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    • #3

      Re: Shurflo Pump?

      Re: Shurflo Pump?

      just need pressure - tank is little above the cabin - still debating on 12-24v system

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      • #4

        Re: Shurflo Pump?

        Re: Shurflo Pump?

        Actually, most of the shurflos are good pumps in my experience

        I would consider this one for full time:

        http://legacy.shurflo.com/pages/RV/r...r/extreme.html

        tony
        Please note, being a moderator does not add any weight to my opinions 300 watts Siemens/BP panels,plus a Sun 90,, making ~400. ~30 amps into Rogue MPT-3024, 450 ah of Trojan T-105, Morningstar ts300 inverter, a Tri-Metric meter.a collection of antique generators, plus 2 Honda eu-1000i's (also a BS2512 IX controller) and assorted other stuff!

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        • #5

          Re: Shurflo Pump?

          Re: Shurflo Pump?

          Have one running for 5 years now to a header tank about 10 meters head . Hasn't missed a beat.
          I'm on 1 2volts but would definitely go for 24 if starting again.
          1200 watts pv .Outback fm80. 4 times 6 volt surette 450 ah batts. Victron batt moniter. 1800 ps xantrex inveter. Off grid holiday home.

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          • #6

            Re: Shurflo Pump?

            Re: Shurflo Pump?

            Thanks for the information, last ? How to add it to 24v system if I decide to go that route

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            • #7

              Re: Shurflo Pump?

              Re: Shurflo Pump?

              Originally posted by Jcrabtree View Post
              Thanks for the information, last ? How to add it to 24v system if I decide to go that route
              24 Volts worth of battery and a charging system to match?
              Sorry, but not knowing what you've got now or how much the pump will be used it's hard to be specific. Could you elaborate?

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              • #8

                Re: Shurflo Pump?

                Re: Shurflo Pump?

                nothing yet - still up for debate 12v - 24v system wanted to start off small with rogue charge controller available in June - 4 T105re batteries - panels still up for debate - as for watts/amp - per day still in the works.

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                • #9

                  Re: Shurflo Pump?

                  Re: Shurflo Pump?

                  Just as a sample based on four 225 Amp hour 6 Volt batteries:

                  112 Amp hours (50% DOD) @ 24 Volts = 2688 Watt hours power potential
                  22.5 Amps @ 28.8 Volts charging = 648 Watts, less typical 77% derating = 842 Watt array
                  Quick AC potential estimate: 1684 Watt hours per day.

                  Could be better, could be worse.

                  The ol' 12 vs. 24 question still comes down to what you expect to have in sustained loads: 1 kW or less, 12 Volts will do. Over that and 24 becomes attractive.

                  Were it not for the pumps needed at my locale I would have stuck with 12 Volts - and a much smaller inverter. Skip the electric 'frige too, and I could have used the Morningstar 300. Although that didn't exist at the time.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Shurflo Pump?

                    Re: Shurflo Pump?

                    I highly recommend the variable speed DC pumps for domestic water. They don't cycle on and off when you barely crack open a faucet, just run slower. I'm using the Jabsco version, the only problem that I've found with it is that sometimes the over voltage protection in it will shut it down for 5 or 10 minutes right before my batteries go to float.(any suggestions?) It works well with the demand heater, the heater doesn't shut off if someone opens a faucet somewhere else.

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                    • #11

                      Re: Shurflo Pump?

                      Re: Shurflo Pump?

                      Originally posted by monoloco View Post
                      I highly recommend the variable speed DC pumps for domestic water. They don't cycle on and off when you barely crack open a faucet, just run slower. I'm using the Jabsco version, the only problem that I've found with it is that sometimes the over voltage protection in it will shut it down for 5 or 10 minutes right before my batteries go to float.(any suggestions?) It works well with the demand heater, the heater doesn't shut off if someone opens a faucet somewhere else.
                      Doesn't like the Absorb Voltage level? How would it respond to a bit of resistance in the line? Just enough to knock out half a Volt or so. Perhaps an appropriate diode?

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                      • #12

                        Re: Shurflo Pump?

                        Re: Shurflo Pump?

                        Originally posted by Cariboocoot View Post
                        Doesn't like the Absorb Voltage level? How would it respond to a bit of resistance in the line? Just enough to knock out half a Volt or so. Perhaps an appropriate diode?
                        How would I find out more about that? My batteries never go below 25 volts so a volt off wouldn't make much difference. Would a diode cause a decrease in amperage also?

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                        • #13

                          Re: Shurflo Pump?

                          Re: Shurflo Pump?

                          Shurflo's are diaphram pumps and works well in my experience. They do put a pulsation into the water however which you'll probably feel/hear throughout your pressurized lines.
                          2.7kW Trina/Xantrex GT, 3.7kW Trina/SolarEdge, 3kW CSI/SMA GT, Solar well pump on 6, 25yr old Holeck 48W modules. Toyota SR5 converted to 108V EV. Prius w/Enginer PHEV conversion. BSEE, R11-residential, NABCEP, SunnyPro, >800kW installed
                          "Faced with the choice between changing one's mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof." - John Kenneth Galbraith

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                          • #14

                            Re: Shurflo Pump?

                            Re: Shurflo Pump?

                            Originally posted by monoloco View Post
                            How would I find out more about that? My batteries never go below 25 volts so a volt off wouldn't make much difference. Would a diode cause a decrease in amperage also?
                            Not an engineer so I'm working from what others have posted.
                            Putting a diode in line should result in about 0.6 Volt drop, which might be enough to resolve the over-Voltage issue. Don't know the specs on your pump either; but getting the available Voltage to match limit with the pump could be the cause. You could check the Voltage at the pump just before Float and see what it gets up to. Could be the current draw of the causes a momentary Voltage spike when the controller switches from Absorb to Float.

                            You'd need one rated to handle at least the current of the pump.

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                            • #15

                              Re: Shurflo Pump?

                              Re: Shurflo Pump?

                              As Cariboocoot/Marc says, you can get a large diode (mounted to an insulated heat sink) and drop between 0.2 volts to 0.7-1.0 volts or so per diode.

                              Schottky type diodes are closer to 0.2 volt drop. And "regular" power diodes are closer to 0.7 to 1.0 volt drop.

                              Remember, if you run, for example 5 amps through a 1 volt drop diode, you will have to heat sink it:
                              • Power = Current * Voltage = 5 amps * 1.0 volt drop = 5 watts of heat
                              And the metal diode body will be at ~29 volts (or whatever your bank runs out)--so the diode and/or heat sink need to be protected against short circuits to ground.

                              -Bill
                              20x BP 4175B panels (replacement) + Xantrex GT 3.3 inverter for 3kW Grid Tied system + Honda eu2000i Inverter/Generator for emergency backup.

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