MPPT Charge controller setting help :)

Aaron_MNAaron_MN Registered Users Posts: 4
Ok so diving into and starting to experiment with solar and the systems behind it and here is my question concern.
I have a 100W PV going to an EPEVER MPPT 30A controller then from there I am going to 2 100Ah deep cycle marine batteries (flooded i think) in parallel. 
1. The Batteries.  These are the type that you pop off a cap and can fill with distilled water when low. Is that considered flooded?
2. Charge controller settings for the batteries.  
        - currently I have the default settings for the below items but i fear that these are way too high for these batteries. Can anyone help me on setting my controller up properly?

Current Settings:
  
Over Voltage Disconnect Voltage: 16V
Charging Limit Voltage: 15V
Over Voltage Reconnect Voltage: 15V
Equalize Charging Voltage: 14.8V
Boost Charging Voltage: 14.6
Float Charging Voltage:13.8
Boost Reconnect Charging Voltage: 13.2
Low Voltage Reconnect Voltage:12.6
Under Voltage Warning Reconnect Voltage: 12.2
Under Volt. Warning Volt.: 12.0
Low Volt. Disconnect Volt: 11.1
Discharging Limit Voltage:10.6
Equalize Duration (min.) : 120
Boost Duration (min.) : 120
 

Comments

  • mcgivormcgivor Registered Users Posts: 1,358 ✭✭✭✭
    The controller will need more than 1 panel to work, the MPPT needs to have a higher input voltage, around twice the battery voltage or more to function properly.
    The batteries are flooded if water can be added, the question is, are they deep cycle, the popping if the caps sounds like that they are automotive batteries, can you confirm. The default values look pretty standard, some minor adjustments could be tailored to meet manufacturers recommendations.
      1500W, 6× Schutten 250W Poly panels , Schneider 150 60 CC, Schneider SW 2524 inverter, 8×T105 GC 24V nominal 

  • PhotowhitPhotowhit Solar Expert Posts: 4,311 ✭✭✭✭
    Actually perhaps too low for some of the numbers, likely the preset?

    There is a lot of good information in the FAQ's, If you look down for battery life span, you will find Marine have the widest range of life spans, 1-6 years. Most 'Marine' batteries are not true deep cycle batteries. The fact that you know the amp hour rating may indicate that you have indeed purchased true deep cycle batteries!

    https://www.solar-electric.com/learning-center/batteries-and-charging/deep-cycle-battery-faq.html

    Usually you would want to be able to charge at, at least 5% of the battery capacity. For a 200 amp hour battery bank that would be 10 amps. A single 100 amp solar panel is likely only to produce about 75amps (or 75% of it's panel label), So you will be producing at best about 6.5amps.

    Not sure if your MPPT charge controller is actually a true MPPT type, some inexpensive ones aren't real. MPPT type charge controller like to have about 30% more voltage input than output. Likely you have a solar panel with 36 cells and an output of about 17.5 volt (VMP). Likely will work but not at it's best potential.

    What are your intended uses?
    Home system 4000 watt (Evergreen) array standing, with 2 Midnite Classic Lites,  Midnite E-panel, Prosine 1800 and Exeltech 1100, ForkLift battery. Off grid for @13 of last 14 years. 1000 watts being added to current CC, @2700 watts to be added with an additional CC.
  • Aaron_MNAaron_MN Registered Users Posts: 4
    mcgivor, 
           The PV panel system is inputting at max around 18 - 19V I should of stated that earlier that the PV is a set of panels.  But as for the batteries they are cheapo Exide Nautilus Marine Deep Cycle batteries 27MDC's.  Right now being a total noob to solar I didn't want to get too excited about the batteries as my application right now is charging of mobile devices, a few 12V lights and a ceiling fan in my garage.
    The popping of caps is there are 2 square style covers on each battery that when open expose 6 fill ports.   
  • mcgivormcgivor Registered Users Posts: 1,358 ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2017 #5
    The voltage input maximum for the CC is 100V, although the panel open circuit voltage may be 18-19V, under load, when charging, this will drop, having 2 panels in series will raise the voltage (36-38V) sufficiently to allow the MPPT to do its magical down conversation, which is lowering voltages to charging levels whilst converting excess into current to more efficiently charge the battery. Very basic explanation.
    https://www.solar-electric.com/learning-center/batteries-and-charging/mppt-solar-charge-controllers.html 
    The batteries are not true deep cycle, but for learning purposes they are fine
      1500W, 6× Schutten 250W Poly panels , Schneider 150 60 CC, Schneider SW 2524 inverter, 8×T105 GC 24V nominal 

  • Aaron_MNAaron_MN Registered Users Posts: 4
    Thank you for the input that makes sense.  
  • fratermusfratermus Registered Users Posts: 14 ✭✭
    mcgivor said:
    The controller will need more than 1 panel to work, the MPPT needs to have a higher input voltage, around twice the battery voltage or more to function properly.

    What do "work" and "function properly" mean in this context?  Efficiently?  Cost-effectively? 

    I trust you are not claiming that an MPPT controller cannot do PPT or downconversion on a nominal 12v panel and bank.





    2017 Promaster 159" DIY camper
    570W mono / 220AH GC
  • mcgivormcgivor Registered Users Posts: 1,358 ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2017 #8
    fratermus said:
    mcgivor said:
    The controller will need more than 1 panel to work, the MPPT needs to have a higher input voltage, around twice the battery voltage or more to function properly.

    What do "work" and "function properly" mean in this context?  Efficiently?  Cost-effectively? 

    I trust you are not claiming that an MPPT controller cannot do PPT or downconversion on a nominal 12v panel and bank.







    The MPPT controller will down convert even with a 12V nominal panel, but it would be less efficient, the controller needs more headroom, in terms of voltage, inversely too high a voltage has the reverse  effect, becoming less efficient, however, if the distance between the array and controller is large, the benifits of higher voltage could offset the costs of using larger gauge conductors. A good rule of thumb is to have approximately double the nominal battery voltage, this allows charging in lower light conditions, where a voltage slightly above nominal would be insufficient to produce, due to its limitations.
      1500W, 6× Schutten 250W Poly panels , Schneider 150 60 CC, Schneider SW 2524 inverter, 8×T105 GC 24V nominal 

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