Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

bebeybebey Posts: 27Solar Expert ✭✭
I still consider myself a novice in the solar arena so I appreciate any input and advice.

I'm looking at 3 different L16 type batteries: Trojan, Deka, and Rayovac.

I've been using Trojan T-105s for a couple years now, but am about ready to significantly upgrade my system. I've currently got 12 Schott 202 on a 24v system, but plan on upgrading and adding 9 more Schott 225s and a 48v system.

Specifically, I'm comparing price/amp hours of the three batteries:

The Trojans are rated 370ah, and cost around 355.
The Deka also 370 and cost around 333.
The Rayovac is only rated at 330ah but costs 259 (230 if I buy them in quantity of 24)


The Rayovac are significantly cheaper even considering the amp hours. With the other 2, I would have 16 batteries total 5920ah, (price 5320-5680) . But I am considering 24 of the Rayovac for a total of 7920ah (price 5520).

It seems like a no brainer, but I have not heard of any experiences with the Rayovac, and I am always skeptical of something too good to be true. But having my batteries drop down so much less every day seems like a great way to extend life.

Thoughts?

Current: 12 Schott 202, Outback 80, Trojan T-105s, Xantrex TR2424 (modified wave) Tri-metric, miscellaneous breaker boxes and surge protection. About to add 9 more Schott 225s, dump the Xantrex, and replace with a Magnum 4400W 48V 120/240v Inverter (full sign) and replace the T 105s with 16-24 L16s.
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Comments

  • MangasMangas Posts: 547Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    My opinion, Trojan L-16 REB 6 Volt (48 Volt System).
    Ranch Off Grid System & Custom Home: 2 x pair stacked Schneider XW 5548+ Plus inverters (4), 2 x Schneider MPPT 80-600 Charge Controllers, 2 Xanbus AGS Generator Start and Air Extraction System Controllers, 64 Trojan L16 REB 6v 375 AH Flooded Cel Batteries w/Water Miser Caps, 44 x 185 Sharp Solar Panels, Cummins Onan RS20 KW Propane Water Cooled Genset, ICF House Construction, all appliances, Central A/C, 2 x High Efficiency Variable Speed three ton Central A/C 220v compressors, 2 x Propane furnaces, 2 x Variable Speed Air Handlers, 2 x HD WiFi HVAC Zoned System Controllers
  • inetdoginetdog Posts: 3,121Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.
    bebey wrote: »
    replace the T 105s with 16-24 L16s.

    If you need to get more energy storage in the batteries and are looking for longest life and best performance:

    1. Go to 48 volts as long as you are able to replace the inverter. You will get little argument about this decision.
    2. Whatever amp hour total you calculate that you will need at 48 volts, DO NOT plan on getting it by putting 8 six volt batteries in series and then using two or three such strings in parallel.
    You will be better off by getting 2 or 4 volt batteries of the full AH capacity you need and then putting 24 or 12 of them in series. The only persuasive argument for two parallel strings of batteries is to allow you to put together an emergency single string for partial power if some of your batteries go bad and you cannot immediately replace the whole set.
    SMA SB 3000, old BP panels.
  • CariboocootCariboocoot Posts: 17,615Banned ✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    Whoa. Basic math here:
    Sixteen 370 Amp hour 6 Volt batteries configured for a 48 Volt system is two parallel strings of eight for a total of 740 Amp hours, not 7920. That last number would be an outrageous amount of power.
    As it is you're looking at 370 Amp hours (50% DOD) * 48 Volts = 17,760 Watt hours potential. That's a lot of stored power.
    If this is what you need, listen to inetdog; skip the sixteen 6 Volt units and use twelve 2 Volt batteries instead: http://www.solar-electric.com/repoba2vo750.html
    Advantages: fewer interconnect wires (six vs. ten) and no parallel strings. The only down side is the price: $8,400 vs. $5,800.
    If you really need the twenty-four battery 1110 Amp hours it becomes more logical to go with 2 Volts.
    http://www.solar-electric.com/repoba2vo10a.html times twelve is $8,844, still only six interconnecting wires instead of sixteen for three parallel strings of L16's @ $8,712.
    (Using all Crown batteries for comparison - you need to shop in your area to see what you can get.)
    Don't discount the possibility of forklift batteries either.

    Sorry, I have no experience with Rayovac wet cells. Crown and Trojan I know both to be good brands.
  • nielniel Posts: 10,311Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    another aspect that may sway your decision could be the warranty so that's worth checking out.
  • bebeybebey Posts: 27Solar Expert ✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    I had made the (obviously incorrect) assumption that the amphours added up. Fortunetely I mentioned I was a novice. :) I have been meaning to find a primer on understanding the electrical aspects of this better and obviously need to.

    Thanks again to everyone for your insight thus far.

    Can you help me understand why a string of batteries in series and then double (or tripled up) in parallel is not acceptable? It seems like a significant jump in cost to go with 2v systems (and I'm already decided on 48 volt so that I don't have to add an additional charge controller). I was told that my Outback is maxed out at its current 24 volt, but if I go to 48 volt it can handle more panels.

    I suspect it has something to do with the weakest battery in the link, but if they are all the same age, all taken care of, equalized regularly, etc., why does it make such a difference on the length of the series? And what is the upper limit of the series and why?

    Thanks again!
  • CariboocootCariboocoot Posts: 17,615Banned ✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    Well here is the start of the explanation: http://forum.solar-electric.com/showthread.php?15989-Battery-System-Voltages-and-equivalent-power
    :D

    One day I may get 'round to writing the finish of it. :p

    The problem basically comes down to this: when you parallel battery strings you create different paths each with its own resistance. Trying to keep the current flow in to and out of multiple paths the same is nearly impossible. It won't show up at first, but over time the strings will get used differently and thus the batteries will age differently. Even 'identical' batteries aren't to begin with, and ever-so-slight differences in the wiring resistance add to it. It is worse on 12 Volt systems than on 48, but the differences and their resultant effects are there, no matter how carefully you look after the batteries and wiring.

    As such, two parallel strings are the most you want to try. You can do three or four if you use care to wire them equally, but the current sharing becomes more of a problem the more paths you create.

    Usually you don't pick system Voltage as a matter of how many panels you can feed through the controller. Quite the other way around: you size the battery bank according to how much power you need to store, and then select appropriate array and controller size to recharge it.
  • inetdoginetdog Posts: 3,121Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.
    Usually you don't pick system Voltage as a matter of how many panels you can feed through the controller. Quite the other way around: you size the battery bank according to how much power you need to store, and then select appropriate array and controller size to recharge it.

    On the other hand, if you calculate the size of your battery bank for a particular voltage (say 24 volts) and then determine that keeping it charged will require two 80 amp CCs, requiring you to split your panel array up into two parts, then you might want to recalculate for 48 volts and just one CC.
    (At the same time, if 80 amps is not enough charging current, it suggests that the corresponding peak load current is probably in the neighborhood of 100 amps or more, which also argues for a step up in bank voltage.)

    If the difference were between an 80Amp CC and a 40Amp CC, then that would not be as factor. (I am not familiar with any off-the-shelf 160Amp CCs.)
    SMA SB 3000, old BP panels.
  • Eric LEric L Posts: 260Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.
    Quite the other way around: you size the battery bank according to how much power you need to store, and then select appropriate array and controller size to recharge it.

    I would add to this that your proposed battery banks in post #1 represent very different capacities. If you don't need 990 amp hours x 48 volts = 47.5 KW (the Rayovac option) there's not much point in considering it even if it seems like the better deal, and even if the 3 paralleled series strings were a non-issue. Maybe you already know this, but knowing how much power you need from the batteries, how long you might need it for (amount of cloudy/winter sun days), and what happens when the batteries go too low (generator? type and cost of operation?) is crucial to making a good decision.

    Also, I don't know where you're getting your battery prices, but it should be from local distributors, not the web. Example: Trojan L16E-AC batteries (the 370 ah ones you are probably looking at) are a lot less than $335 around me; maybe around you too. At any rate, check and cross-shop.
  • CariboocootCariboocoot Posts: 17,615Banned ✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.
    inetdog wrote: »
    On the other hand, if you calculate the size of your battery bank for a particular voltage (say 24 volts) and then determine that keeping it charged will require two 80 amp CCs, requiring you to split your panel array up into two parts, then you might want to recalculate for 48 volts and just one CC.
    (At the same time, if 80 amps is not enough charging current, it suggests that the corresponding peak load current is probably in the neighborhood of 100 amps or more, which also argues for a step up in bank voltage.)

    If the difference were between an 80Amp CC and a 40Amp CC, then that would not be as factor. (I am not familiar with any off-the-shelf 160Amp CCs.)

    Uh, that's actually part of picking the system Voltage.
    Don't worry; I'm going to write this all down some day. :p
  • mikeomikeo Posts: 386Solar Expert ✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    If you need that much battery storage, I would consider buying a refurbished 48 volt forklift battery. You are likely to get a much better life span out of it then all those L16's.
  • PhotowhitPhotowhit Posts: 4,703Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.
    bebey wrote: »
    ...mentioned I was a novice. ...

    I think if your a novice, you might go all the way back to "sizing your system to your loads". If you want 2x the amount of energy to play with that's fine, but easier to plan ahead for the loads you will have...

    If you NEED a true sine wave, or NEED to replace your batteries and expect you'll need more energy in the near future, that might be a reason to just want something bigger now, but most often we suggest planning for your loads. Do you know what amount of energy you use on a daily basis?

    As to a single string of 2V cells I decided a forklift battery was the cheapest alternative. NAWS sells them, and it's the one type of battery you can find on the internet. GB Batteries Here.
    Home system 4000 watt (Evergreen) array standing, with 2 Midnite Classic Lites,  Midnite E-panel, Prosine 1800 and Exeltech 1100, ForkLift battery. Off grid for @13 of last 14 years. 1000 watts being added to current CC, @2700 watts to be added with an additional CC.
  • bebeybebey Posts: 27Solar Expert ✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    I sure do have a lot to learn, and I feel like I don't even understand enough to know what direction to turn next. :)

    Maybe my objectives will help:
    Priority 1 (P1) is to have my battery bank sized in such a way that I get maximum life out of it. If that means I can only draw it down 10-15% on average, I'm willing to pay for the batteries (within reason). Longevity is my number one goal as I'm one of those oddballs that doesn't know if batteries will always be readily available for replacement.
    P2 - To have as little reliance on generators (especially fossil fuels) as possible. I live in Central TX about an hour outside of SE Austin, plenty of sun, and supplemental wind power is an option as well. I might consider a wood gasifier generator in the future, but right now I want to size for complete self-reliance if needed. I know I won't be able to run my entertainment center, and all of my high-tech computers (I'm a major IT kind of guy), but juice for a laptop, my on-demand (propane) water heater that supplements my solar hot water collectors, some outlets for lights and fans, electric fences for my animals (one is already converted to solar) and a 1 ton mini-split A/C unit (A guy I know runs 5 of them off of his array at Industrial Country Market [can be seen on the web] and my house is pretty small and 'very well' insulated), my well pump (200 feet 220 volt but I'm considering getting a slow-startup 110 volt unit) and water softener system, rainwater catchment pumps, greenhouse fans, and kitchen appliances (not the stove - it's gas), and hopefully you have an idea of where I am heading.
    P3 - Converting to full sign wave so I don't have to worry about compatibility issues with recharging tools, warmer running pumps/fans, etc.

    At this point, I have not purchased the new batteries, the new inverter or my additional panels, so I have some flexibility on what direction to go. I'm worried I'm writing a book here, so once again thanks everyone for taking the time to answer noob questions (and I will be checking out the links provided!)

    Have a great evening!
    Bret
  • bebeybebey Posts: 27Solar Expert ✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    5977 bucks for a 48v industrial battery, 750 AH (6 hr) 1182 (20hr) capacity. Would that solve my problems and make this simpler? I should have listened an additional priority of not wanting to become an electrician if I can avoid it. ;) The basics I definitely plan on learning, but if being an IT guy for 20 years has taught me anything, it is that simplicity wins every time...
  • icarusicarus Posts: 5,108Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    To avoid the "ready, fire, aim" mistkes, try to remember and erect the first law of off grid solar. All component choices stem from the load calcs. Define your daily/weekly loads, both in terms of daily KWHs, but also the peak loads during the day. This will determine the size of the battery bank, the number of days of autonomy etc, and the size of the battery will determine the size of the PV and the proper charging regimen.

    Any other approach is square pegging. Since you haven't bought components you re one step ahead of most newbies.

    Good luck, keep in touch, and welcome to the forum,

    Tony
  • BB.BB. Posts: 27,887Super Moderators, Administrators admin
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    Rather than focusing on shallow discharge--You probably should be looking at industrial/forklift type batteries instead if you want long life.

    Even telecom batteries designed for long life are broken into those designed for float service vs those designed for actual daily/scheduled cycling.

    There are other battery failure modes besides just plate shedding/sulfation. And batteries not designed for long life can still fail from positive grid corrosion (and I am sure, many other modes of failure).

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • mikeomikeo Posts: 386Solar Expert ✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.
    bebey wrote: »
    5977 bucks for a 48v industrial battery, 750 AH (6 hr) 1182 (20hr) capacity. Would that solve my problems and make this simpler? I should have listened an additional priority of not wanting to become an electrician if I can avoid it. ;) The basics I definitely plan on learning, but if being an IT guy for 20 years has taught me anything, it is that simplicity wins every time...
    Do you need that much capacity? You will need about 120 amps of solar to charge that puppy at a 10% rate of charge. That works out to about 12kw worth of solar panels. If you go with a 940 AH at 20 hr rate, you would need about 90 amps solar or 9kw of solar panels. You will also need a generator with at least 100 amp charger for backup purposes to get the battery's charged up quickly during long periods of inclement weather. What ever you choose, if you can't use the power generated by the solar in a balanced system, then you are wasting power and money that you can't use. This is where grid tie with battery backup becomes so much more efficient if you can sell your peak unused power back to the utility company.
  • bebeybebey Posts: 27Solar Expert ✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    I'm not making any decisions until I understand this better, so I really appreciate all the insight from everyone. If I were to start looking around for used/rebuilt forklift batteries, any suggestions on how to find such a thing? (I've been searching craigslist and google but no luck so far). Should I look for a particular voltage/combination or is any combination that meets my voltage requirements okay? (I.E. 4x12, 2x24, etc. I'm not even sure what voltages are available.) Finally, how can I test if a bettery is in decent condition, and if getting two or more, are they close to each other in condition? It seems like you could save some cash buying used if you know what you're doing, but it scares me that I'm going to get crap and maybe better off just buying new.

    Thanks again!
  • CariboocootCariboocoot Posts: 17,615Banned ✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    As others have said, you should reevaluate your loads first.
    Once you have determined how many Watt hours of power you need to supply you can convert that into Amp hours at different Voltage levels and see what works out best for battery capacity.
    A good balance between battery longevity and expense can usually be found at around 25% DOD. So if you determine you need 'X' Amp hours you multiply that by 4 and get the size battery bank you need. It may not be anyplace near the realm of forklift batteries.

    As a rule used batteries are scrap metal. Forklift batteries can be the exception to this, as they are somewhat more "serviceable". This may include remove some bad cells and replacing them with good ones.

    But you really do need to know how much power you're trying to get before you start shopping around.
  • mikeomikeo Posts: 386Solar Expert ✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.
    bebey wrote: »
    If I were to start looking around for used/rebuilt forklift batteries, any suggestions on how to find such a thing? (I've been searching craigslist and google but no luck so far). Should I look for a particular voltage/combination or is any combination that meets my voltage requirements okay? (I.E. 4x12, 2x24, etc. I'm not even sure what voltages are available.)
    Thanks again!
    You can try this site http://www.gbindustrialbattery.com/ as they have dealers all over the country. They do have some sort of guarantee with their refurbished batteries. Also try your more local industrial shops as they have batteries that have been on lease and the equipment to rebuild battery packs and test them for capacity, usually to at least 90%. All forklift battery cells are 2 volts nominal and they have cases that hold 6 cells, 12 cells 18 cells 24 cells. Depending on the size bank you decide on, you usually want to get the battery in 12 volt increments, or 4 cases of 6 cells for say 48 volts. I have 2 cases of 6 cells in my 940 AH bank and each case with cells weighs in around 700 lbs. I couldn't have handled a 1400 pound case without heavy lifting equipment. Your case may be different that you can have the access to where your battery need to be located and equipment to set a larger one in place. By the way, refurbished battery's with a guarantee usually sell at around 50% of new price. Try to use a local distributor because shipping on these are prohibitive.
  • PhotowhitPhotowhit Posts: 4,703Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    I can save you a little time as Craigslist prohibits selling batteries.
    Home system 4000 watt (Evergreen) array standing, with 2 Midnite Classic Lites,  Midnite E-panel, Prosine 1800 and Exeltech 1100, ForkLift battery. Off grid for @13 of last 14 years. 1000 watts being added to current CC, @2700 watts to be added with an additional CC.
  • RolfericRolferic Posts: 1Registered Users
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    Hello,
    Remember Ahrs stays the same in series....and only adds in parallel. So a 48V configuration with (16)[email protected] each, that's 740Ah total,
    or 1110Ahrs for (24) batteries. I have (4)Interstate L-16 Workaholic and they have served me well, and are still going strong. Remember to charge at around 29.2V in absorption to obtain a full charge. Equalize regularly if wet cell, and keep an eye on the water level. Of the 3 brands listed, I would say the Deka has the best track record.
    Eric





    bebey wrote: »
    I still consider myself a novice in the solar arena so I appreciate any input and advice.

    I'm looking at 3 different L16 type batteries: Trojan, Deka, and Rayovac.

    I've been using Trojan T-105s for a couple years now, but am about ready to significantly upgrade my system. I've currently got 12 Schott 202 on a 24v system, but plan on upgrading and adding 9 more Schott 225s and a 48v system.

    Specifically, I'm comparing price/amp hours of the three batteries:

    The Trojans are rated 370ah, and cost around 355.
    The Deka also 370 and cost around 333.
    The Rayovac is only rated at 330ah but costs 259 (230 if I buy them in quantity of 24)


    The Rayovac are significantly cheaper even considering the amp hours. With the other 2, I would have 16 batteries total 5920ah, (price 5320-5680) . But I am considering 24 of the Rayovac for a total of 7920ah (price 5520).

    It seems like a no brainer, but I have not heard of any experiences with the Rayovac, and I am always skeptical of something too good to be true. But having my batteries drop down so much less every day seems like a great way to extend life.

    Thoughts?

    Current: 12 Schott 202, Outback 80, Trojan T-105s, Xantrex TR2424 (modified wave) Tri-metric, miscellaneous breaker boxes and surge protection. About to add 9 more Schott 225s, dump the Xantrex, and replace with a Magnum 4400W 48V 120/240v Inverter (full sign) and replace the T 105s with 16-24 L16s.
  • H2SO4_guyH2SO4_guy Posts: 212Solar Expert ✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    What area of the country are you in? You may have more options than you realize.

    I elected to use diverted batteries and so far they are awesome. I got 54 Panasonic 2 volt cells for about $1100.00 not counting the lead trade in. So doing the math I have 1 string of 1040 AH cells at 48 volts (at the 8 hour rate) with 30 spare cells to replace any that may fail. Two strings of golf cart batteries would cost more and they are only about 165 AH per string at the 8 hour rate. There is 112 kwh of power in the batteries of which about 50% is usable. These things are monsters too. I can arc weld, run the AC, and brew a pot of coffee all at the same time!

    Skip
    12K asst panels charging through Midnite Classic 150's, powering Exeltechs and Outback VFX-3648 inverter at 12 and 48 volts.  2080 AH @ 48 VDC of Panasonic Stationary batteries (2 strings of 1040 AH each) purchased for slightly over scrap, installed August 2013.  Outback PSX-240X for 220 volt duties.  No genny usage since 2014. 
  • NorthGuyNorthGuy Posts: 1,925Solar Expert
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.
    H2SO4_guy wrote: »
    I elected to use diverted batteries and so far they are awesome.

    How would I elect to use diverted batteries?

    How long is "so far"?
  • H2SO4_guyH2SO4_guy Posts: 212Solar Expert ✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    So far is about 2 weeks. When I got them they were fully charged. I set up 2 strings of 48 volts and each string was within .02 volts of each other, so pretty close. The other 6 are in 1 string of 12 volts and they are sort of on standby in case they are needed.

    I found out where some of the battery companies take their batteries for scrapping and went there looking for stationary batteries. After several weeks of taking them cookies (Which I did not factor into the cost, but should of, hehe) I got some great options. I traded in my 13 year old Lucent 2 volt cells, which still worked, just wanted more capacity, and lots of other junk batteries to offset the cost. If you are anywhere near KC I can offer suggestions. I looked at forklift batteries, but these seemed a much better deal.

    Skip
    12K asst panels charging through Midnite Classic 150's, powering Exeltechs and Outback VFX-3648 inverter at 12 and 48 volts.  2080 AH @ 48 VDC of Panasonic Stationary batteries (2 strings of 1040 AH each) purchased for slightly over scrap, installed August 2013.  Outback PSX-240X for 220 volt duties.  No genny usage since 2014. 
  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Posts: 3,009Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    I know the original poster didn't ask about Surette Rolls, but I picked up my 6 new 2 volt L-16 batteries right from the factory on Monday, freshly made. I had to wait 3 wks for them to be made. So far very happy with them. Checked each one right on the loading dock for voltage and SG. All were fully charged, ready to go. I was happy.
    Got them installed yesterday and so far I couldn't imagine asking for anything better for my needs. Awesome to FINALLY have one single series string!
    So far things are looking really, really good and I'm happy. Yes, they cost a bit more than the more common 6 volt versions, but the satisfaction of only having 6 cells instead of 18 to monitor and water, and having one single series string instead of 3 parallel strings, makes it all worth while for me.
    On top of that, a much more solid connection stud than the relatively fragile L tab the retired batteries had.
    Link to photo and info of this battery for those who may be interested: http://www.dcbattery.com/rollssurrette_s1380.html
  • Ralph DayRalph Day Posts: 867Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    Oh Wayne, you lucky guy! No shipping charges, checking voltage and sg right at the loading dock! Lots of jealous people on the forum.

    Ralph
  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Posts: 3,009Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.
    Ralph Day wrote: »
    Oh Wayne, you lucky guy! No shipping charges, checking voltage and sg right at the loading dock! Lots of jealous people on the forum.

    Ralph

    Haha But Ralph, I didn't tell you the whole story. lol Wish you could have seen the look on my face when (I brought my own old reliable hydrometer with me) I stuck my hydrometer in the first battery, sucked up the liquid and the bulb stayed on the bottom, didn't move even one mm. So on to he next, and the third. All the same, the bulb refused to move! What the HECK!? were they filled with distilled water instead of electrolyte? My heart sunk to the floor! Yet the voltages seemed fine. At this point the shipper got his $3500. electronic hydrometer, checked all 6 cells in front of me and they all checked fine. It was then I discovered I must have stepped on my hydrometer during the trip to the factory. The inner bulb had a hole in the bottom that has stuck to the rubber on the lower end of the glass cylinder. WOW! I could breath again! They were very nice with me and gave me a brand new hydrometer for free. Hahahahaha
    Yes, I'm so far VERY pleased with my new battery bank and it was indeed great to check them before leaving the factory, and so nice to know they were fully charged and ready to go. :)
  • Ralph DayRalph Day Posts: 867Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.

    That'll be one to bring out at the xmas party...guy checks sg with a stick (essentially).

    Ralph
  • waynefromnscanadawaynefromnscanada Posts: 3,009Solar Expert ✭✭✭✭
    Re: Comparison between 3 different L16 type batteries.
    Ralph Day wrote: »
    That'll be one to bring out at the xmas party...guy checks sg with a stick (essentially).

    Ralph
    Hahahahahaha That was about the size of it Ralph, and a GLASS stick at that!! :D
  • ImpactBatteryImpactBattery Posts: 2Registered Users
    When this post first came out in 2012 the user 'bebey' compared three flooded L16 batteries. I think those looking to use an L16 Solar Battery should also consider the sealed AGM as prices have come way down (on some brands) while quality is equal to or better than the flooded. A customer of ours recently installed 24 of the UB63800 sealed AGM for a number of reasons (which you can read about here) one of which included comparable pricing to the flooded.
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