solar system for submersible pump

ceshydroceshydro Registered Users Posts: 4
We are trying pump water from a spring house over a 120 f00t hill to a village in Haiti.  We were given a Grunfos submersible 1.3 hp pump that I believe runs on ac or dc power.  We would like input regarding the sizing a solar system, and input on whether we need batteries,etc.
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  • BB.BB. Super Moderators Posts: 26,872 admin
    Is there a part number/model number on the pump? Need to know exactly what you have to make sure that we have the correct tables/equipment for your needs.

    Also, will the pump be pressuring a water tank, or just filling a cistern? How far down is the village below the 120 foot hill (i.e., can the village water be pressurized by a cistern on the top of the hill)?

    Just pump during daylight hours? Or pump 24x7 (battery system needed for pressurization)?

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • ceshydroceshydro Registered Users Posts: 4
    we will be pumping to cisterns during daylight with Grundfos model D P2 1316 submersible pump.  
    Craig
  • jonrjonr Solar Expert Posts: 877 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 15 #4
    I didn't find anything searching for that model number.  By far the easiest and most reliable design for solar is to use a Grundfos SQFlex pump.
  • BB.BB. Super Moderators Posts: 26,872 admin
    If you will be using AC power only--The SQ series is cheaper (I think).

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • HorseflyHorsefly Registered Users Posts: 269 ✭✭✭
    BB. said:
    If you will be using AC power only--The SQ series is cheaper (I think).

    -Bill
    For sure. I was looking at the SQFlex initially for our eventual replacement pump, but I realized I would be paying much more for the DC/AC power flexibility that I really didn't need. 

    As for the part number: I also can't find anything like that in Grundfos literature. The 316 probably is regarding the stainless steel housing, but the rest doesn't fit, at least relative to submersible well pumps.
    Off-grid cabin: 6 x Canadian Solar CSK-280M PV panels, Schneider XW-MPPT60-150 Charge Controller, Schneider CSW4024 Inverter/Charger, Schneider SCP, 4 x Vmax XTR12-155 12V, 155AH batteries in a 2x2 24V 310AH bank.
  • ceshydroceshydro Registered Users Posts: 4
    Here is the spec sheet info, Only AC?

    Product No.: 98163731

    The SQFlex motor range comprises only one motor size, the MSF 3 with max. power input (P1) of 900

    W. MSF 3 is a 3" motor. The speed range for the motor is 500-3000 min-1 depending on the power

    input and the load. The motor has been developed especially for the SQFlex system.

    The motor is designed according to the permanent-magnet principle with built-in electronic unit.

    Liquid:

    Maximum liquid temperature: 104 °F

    Technical:

    Approvals on motor nameplate: CE,RCM,EAC

    Materials:

    Motor: Stainless steel

    DIN W.-Nr. 1.4301

    AISI 304

    Installation:

    Maximum ambient pressure: 218 psi

    Electrical data:

    Motor type: MSF3

    Power input - P1: 1.4 kW

    Rated power - P2: 1.341 HP

    Rated voltage ac: 1 x 90-240 V

    Rated voltage dc: 30-300 V

    Rated current: 8.4 A

    Power factor: 1,0

    Rated speed: 500-3600 rpm

    Start. method: direct-on-line

    Enclosure class (IEC 34-5): IP68

    Insulation class (IEC 85): F

    Thanks,

    Craig

  • HorseflyHorsefly Registered Users Posts: 269 ✭✭✭
    That's the sqflex, so you paid a little extra so it would take either DC (30-300V) or AC (90-240V).  I can read pump curves, but others here are more pump-literate than me. I'll let them comment on how it should work in your situation.
    Off-grid cabin: 6 x Canadian Solar CSK-280M PV panels, Schneider XW-MPPT60-150 Charge Controller, Schneider CSW4024 Inverter/Charger, Schneider SCP, 4 x Vmax XTR12-155 12V, 155AH batteries in a 2x2 24V 310AH bank.
  • jonrjonr Solar Expert Posts: 877 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 16 #9
    My understanding is 200-600W of  panels wired for 30-300VDC (from above).  No batteries.

    Not clear is why some sources say that it will utilize a max of ~600W when above specs say the motor can draw more than twice that.  Perhaps an inverter limitation.


  • BB.BB. Super Moderators Posts: 26,872 admin
    Not at computer for the moment. But, as I recall, the SQFlex needs something like 64 to 96 VDC minimum to run the pump motor at rated power.

    Check the manual/specifications to be sure.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
  • ceshydroceshydro Registered Users Posts: 4
    Sorry Bill,  I have been away.  You are saying that we may need as much as 600 watts of panels.  I am mostly ignorant about this, but will consult the local solar company here.  The  folks on Isle a Vache thank you for your help.
    Craig
  • BB.BB. Super Moderators Posts: 26,872 admin
    Craig,

    You need to define the "lift" the pump will have to over come... Assuming 120 Ft lift, and 10% piping losses, and no top of hill pressure tank (pumping directly into top of open tank), you would use a chart like this:

    https://product-selection.grundfos.com/product-detail.html?productnumber=95027335&productrange=gma&lang=USA

    Note, it appears that you gave us the Motor P/N only. There are different pumps bolted on to the motor that offer much different pefromance numbers (i.e., high volume, low pressure vs low volume & high pressure).

    For the chart I linked too... 120ft + 10% (pure guess) piping losses = 131 feet ~ 40 meters of lift

    From the table, 40 meters and 600 watts gives you a rated (noon time) maximum flow rate of ~2.8 cu meters per hour (if I read the table correctly). And more than ~600 watts of panels will not give you more pumping volume (or pressure)--But will give you more hours per day of pumping (morning and afternoon pumping).

    Need more information--This is just an example that may very well be wrong.

    -Bill
    Near San Francisco California: 3.5kWatt Grid Tied Solar power system+small backup genset
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