Induction cooktop with proper powe levels vs pulsating high power levels.

animattanimatt Solar Expert Posts: 281 ✭✭✭
I am wondering if any of the common induction cooktops have actual graduated power levels.

Like on low say a 200w setting.  Actually having a consistent 200w load. Rather than most that seem to be full power, just not on all the time.

May run full power for 5 seconds then off for 20 or something like that. To get average power usage down.
  While actual cooking is probably pretty close either way, running off an inverter would be nice to have consistent power levels vs pulsating.

Hope that made sense.
I am particularly interested in consumer grade stuff. But any info would be useful.
Thanks

Comments

  • LumisolLumisol Registered Users Posts: 374 ✭✭✭
    Manufacturers offer both pulsed and non pulsed types in all ranges and prices. Ours is non pulsed, but either will work just as well for cooking.
    Both will use the same energy amounts to produce the same temperature outputs.
    Either will work as well as the other on an inverter.
  • animattanimatt Solar Expert Posts: 281 ✭✭✭
    edited May 18 #3
    Kind of. If you run a 1500w inverter battery system a pulsed induction cooktop would be less benificial. Say you. Have base loads of say 200-300 watts.  Pulsating to may be 1500 watts [or higher] on the cooktop could fault the system when maybe a fixed power level of say 500 even 1000 watts would work just fine. Consistent power levels allow you more consistently max out a smaller system without faulting.  I also prefer more steady state power usage. A single power spike is kind of ok/ tolerable. Having a peak every 20 seconds  or less is less desirable.
    Kind of like having a pressure pump short cycle every 30 seconds.  Steady state is much more friendly.

    I imagine most are pulsated as I imagine a programmed timer is all that is needed to simulate a certain output. Would imagine slight cheaper.  And the cookware is a buffer anyway that smooths out power levels.

    Obviously in the above I am talking about plug in/ above counter units.

  • LumisolLumisol Registered Users Posts: 374 ✭✭✭
    An inverter getting a cooling period between short bursts of usage will keep it running cooler overall vs having it run steady at 50% draw.
  • westbranchwestbranch Solar Expert Posts: 4,873 ✭✭✭✭
    The fan in my 1500w inverter kicks in at about a 1000w draw ... and if it is currly CFL's 500w below that... 
     
    KID #51B  4s 140W to 24V 900Ah C&D AGM
    CL#29032 FW 2126/ 2073/ 2133 175A E-Panel WBjr, 3 x 4s 140W to 24V 900Ah C&D AGM 
    Cotek ST1500W 24V Inverter,OmniCharge 3024,
    2 x Cisco WRT54GL i/c DD-WRT Rtr & Bridge, Hughes1100 Sat Modem
    Eu3/2/1000i Gens, 1680W & E-Panel/WBjr to come, CL #647 asleep
    West Chilcotin, BC, Canada
  • LumisolLumisol Registered Users Posts: 374 ✭✭✭
    Get rid of your CFL's immediately, I got rid of ours over 2 years ago. LED's are cheaper now than when I upgraded.

    there are a lot of these videos. I had one shoot out flames in my hallway light, luckily, it didn't catch anything else on fire.
  • westbranchwestbranch Solar Expert Posts: 4,873 ✭✭✭✭
    good video...!
     
    KID #51B  4s 140W to 24V 900Ah C&D AGM
    CL#29032 FW 2126/ 2073/ 2133 175A E-Panel WBjr, 3 x 4s 140W to 24V 900Ah C&D AGM 
    Cotek ST1500W 24V Inverter,OmniCharge 3024,
    2 x Cisco WRT54GL i/c DD-WRT Rtr & Bridge, Hughes1100 Sat Modem
    Eu3/2/1000i Gens, 1680W & E-Panel/WBjr to come, CL #647 asleep
    West Chilcotin, BC, Canada
  • animattanimatt Solar Expert Posts: 281 ✭✭✭
    I would  disagree with your analysis. 

    First I demonstrated on a small system a constant draw at 50% vs 

    100% power for 50 percent of the time

    Constant draw would be vastly more benificial.
    As in the pulsating situation could usher the whole thing useless. 

    And your analysis of running cooler is a bunch of nonsense.

    We can examine the situation above.

    10 amp at 50% duty cycle.
    And
    5amp at 100 duty cycle.


    I^2R  losses would be 50R for the 10 amp load. 50 percent duty cycle
    I^2R losses would be 25Rfor the 5 amp load 100 percent duty cycle.

    At 50 percent average load pulsating power has DOUBLE I^2R losses.

    At 
    10 amp 20% duty cycle.  20R.  I^2R LOSSES
    Vs
    2 amp 100 duty cycle.  4R I^2R LOSSES.

    5X THE DIFFERNECE in I2R loses .  

    You should be able to see a pattern.
    The difference in I2R losses ends up being 1/duty cycle.

    10 percent duty cycle 1/.1= 10x I2R losses for pulsating

    The heat has to go somewhere.  That is into the inverter to deal with. The inverter running cooler is a bunch of baloney. 

    My breakdown to very simplistic as it does not include many things, like where inverter is most efficient etc.  I am open to more detailed analysis if you care to provide it.


    And there could be a myriad of other usages.  Only thing I  can see in favor of pulsating power is cheaper implementation.

    My understanding constant loads are winners in most situations. Much less stressful on things.



    Curious which cooktop you have that has accurate power levels rather than average power levels?


    Matthew
  • Raj174Raj174 Solar Expert Posts: 477 ✭✭✭✭
    I have both, a rather pricey Maytag induction range and an 1800 watt portable counter top version and they both are the pulse type. In fact I have never seen nor heard of a graduated power induction type before. But, I agree, I also would rather have a constant current draw.  I use the portable for cooking as an opportunity load but I don't use it while the my LFP battery bank is near the top of absorb because the pulsing causes the voltage to jump up and down too much. Not good for LFP.

    Rick 
    12 x 300W Renogy PV, MNE175DR-TR epanel modified, MN Classic 150, Outback Radian GS4048A, Mate3, 51.2V 195AH HI Power LiFePO4 no BMS, 4000W gen.
  • LumisolLumisol Registered Users Posts: 374 ✭✭✭
    animatt said:
    I would  disagree with your analysis. 

    First I demonstrated on a small system a constant draw at 50% vs 

    100% power for 50 percent of the time

    Constant draw would be vastly more benificial.
    As in the pulsating situation could usher the whole thing useless. 

    And your analysis of running cooler is a bunch of nonsense.

    We can examine the situation above.

    10 amp at 50% duty cycle.
    And
    5amp at 100 duty cycle.


    I^2R  losses would be 50R for the 10 amp load. 50 percent duty cycle
    I^2R losses would be 25Rfor the 5 amp load 100 percent duty cycle.

    At 50 percent average load pulsating power has DOUBLE I^2R losses.

    At 
    10 amp 20% duty cycle.  20R.  I^2R LOSSES
    Vs
    2 amp 100 duty cycle.  4R I^2R LOSSES.

    5X THE DIFFERNECE in I2R loses .  

    You should be able to see a pattern.
    The difference in I2R losses ends up being 1/duty cycle.

    10 percent duty cycle 1/.1= 10x I2R losses for pulsating

    The heat has to go somewhere.  That is into the inverter to deal with. The inverter running cooler is a bunch of baloney. 

    My breakdown to very simplistic as it does not include many things, like where inverter is most efficient etc.  I am open to more detailed analysis if you care to provide it.


    And there could be a myriad of other usages.  Only thing I  can see in favor of pulsating power is cheaper implementation.

    My understanding constant loads are winners in most situations. Much less stressful on things.



    Curious which cooktop you have that has accurate power levels rather than average power levels?


    Matthew
    It wasn't an analysis, silly, it was a hypothesis. I have no data to analyze, just an induction stove that does not pulse. I guess I have a good one then if what you claim is true. :) I don't know why they would make both types then unless it's a lot cheaper to make pulsing ones. But why anyone would own one is another story, the costs are just about the same at the point of sale from what I have read on the Maytag site.
  • animattanimatt Solar Expert Posts: 281 ✭✭✭
    Here is a bump to see if there is economical option to non pulsating induction cooktop especifically at lower power levels.
  • mvasmvas Registered Users Posts: 298 ✭✭✭
    What if you contacted these vendors ?
    Best 2017 Induction Cooktops
    http://inductioncooktopreviews.net/
    The mfr can verify whether their cook top pulses ON-OFF or has continuously variable power.
Sign In or Register to comment.