Lake water treatment

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Comments

  • rp3703rp3703 Registered Users Posts: 61 ✭✭
    The problem I've read with UV is that it takes 10 min or so for bulb to get to effective power. So this eliminates using on demand unless it's one all the time, which would drain batteries. I guess I could just flip it on and wait 10 minutes before running water when I want a drink. 
  • LumisolLumisol Registered Users Posts: 374 ✭✭✭
    A fluorescent UV does not need to warm up. We use ozone to help purify our spa.
  • EstragonEstragon Registered Users Posts: 1,429 ✭✭✭✭
    Did the person you're working with get your local water source tested. You really need to know what it is you need to deal with. Parasites? Bacteria? Virals? Metals? Chemicals?

    There's a place not far from me (fortunately a different watershed) that's still dealing with mercury from a mine that closed 40 years ago. You can UV that all you want and still end up with brain damaged kids.
    Off-grid.  
    Main daytime system ~4kw panels into 2xMNClassic150 370ah 48v bank 2xOutback 3548 inverter 120v + 240v autotransformer
    Night system ~1kw panels into 1xMNClassic150 700ah 12v bank morningstar 300w inverter
  • rp3703rp3703 Registered Users Posts: 61 ✭✭
    Won't be able to test water till I get up there in mid-June but other than metals and specific chemicals, would it not be good to take care of all the rest in case they show up later?
  • EstragonEstragon Registered Users Posts: 1,429 ✭✭✭✭
    Sure, but there are trade-offs. I wouldn't want the expense and power draw of a UV system if it wasn't needed.

    Filters (paper+carbon+ceramic) catch most biological and some chemical. They're pretty cheap, don't take power, and with decent pressure provide enough flow to work fine for drinking water. They do need changing periodically though, and probably best for a point of use tap. Picking the right filters does need some understanding of what you're trying to filter out. I have a separate tap in the kitchen for drinking water. My water is pretty good to begin with though, so if someone drinks water from a bathroom tap it's not a big deal.

    My understanding of UV systems is pathogens need to be exposed to the light for a period of time (variable with the pathogen and turbidity of water). I assume such a system would be designed to circulate water in such a way as to ensure the exposure needed.

    You may be able to find some general info on water quality from cottage association or local health authority, and plan on using whatever is commonly used in the area. The local Canadian Tire or Home hardware likely carries whatever works. Metals and chemicals are usually a long term exposure issue, so you could wait for testing to deal with that if needed. Even though the water here is pretty good as-is, some folks only drink bottled water. To each their own.
    Off-grid.  
    Main daytime system ~4kw panels into 2xMNClassic150 370ah 48v bank 2xOutback 3548 inverter 120v + 240v autotransformer
    Night system ~1kw panels into 1xMNClassic150 700ah 12v bank morningstar 300w inverter
  • rp3703rp3703 Registered Users Posts: 61 ✭✭
    We will only be there for a month each year at the most, so I will probably just replace the filters each year for good measure. I still like the idea of knowing, even if there's nothing present that nothing harmful could be living in our drinking water. Years ago, my in-laws would just drink straight from the lake, that was until someone got what was jokingly referred to as beaver fever. Since then, they have been buying 5 gallon water bottles from the marina. With up to 15 people on the island at a time, those bottles add up quickly. Seems ridiculous to be paying for water when you live on a lake surrounded by provincial park. Thanks for everyones help with this.
  • EstragonEstragon Registered Users Posts: 1,429 ✭✭✭✭
    Beaver fever is a parasite. Pretty easily removed with a filter, 1 micron paper should do the job.

    I wonder about the bottled water as well. Aside from the cost, and the PITA factor hauling them around, I have to wonder a bit about what's growing in 1/2 full bottles and what's leaching out of the plastic in the bottle.

    I chuck the carbon and paper filters yearly. The ceramic I scrape down and reuse until it gets too thin, or I break it, whichever comes first.
    Off-grid.  
    Main daytime system ~4kw panels into 2xMNClassic150 370ah 48v bank 2xOutback 3548 inverter 120v + 240v autotransformer
    Night system ~1kw panels into 1xMNClassic150 700ah 12v bank morningstar 300w inverter
  • LumisolLumisol Registered Users Posts: 374 ✭✭✭
    UV filters will have a light bulb inside a tube that the water flows through to expose the water as it is drawn out.

    If you have pure water, there is nothing in it to grow, so water bottles will last indefinitely as long as the water was good when bottled. If you open a bottle and put in a drop of pond water, all bets are off.
  • rp3703rp3703 Registered Users Posts: 61 ✭✭
    Just an update on my situation. After much concern over figuring out the amount of pressure required to force water through a multi-stage filter system, the kind, price and reliability of pump required(RV vs full size) and the size, quality and price of a pressure tank, I elected for the best low tech solution I could find. That turned out to be a Burkey Royal filter and for the past week and a half, it worked like a charm. All you need to do is plan ahead and fill the top up at night and there will be plenty of water for drinking and cooking the following day. I will say that out of the box the two filters need to primed which involves pouring water through them in reverse and therefore should be done with clean water, not lake water. Burkey makes a priming attachment for this which you may want to consider. Other than that, these things are great.
  • PhotowhitPhotowhit Solar Expert Posts: 4,202 ✭✭✭✭
    Good deal, I've used a basic ceramic filter '2 bucket' system for several years now and have been very happy. You can make a 2 bucket system that, arguably, will work just as well for considerably less, but this is one of the best available.

    For those searching, it's a 'Berkey' system.
    Home system 4000 watt (Evergreen) array standing, with 2 Midnite Classic Lites,  Midnite E-panel, Prosine 1800 and Exeltech 1100, ForkLift battery. Off grid for @13 of last 14 years. 1000 watts being added to current CC, @2700 watts to be added with an additional CC.
  • LumisolLumisol Registered Users Posts: 374 ✭✭✭
    > @rp3703 said:
    > Just an update on my situation. After much concern over figuring out the amount of pressure required to force water through a multi-stage filter system, the kind, price and reliability of pump required(RV vs full size) and the size, quality and price of a pressure tank, I elected for the best low tech solution I could find. That turned out to be a Burkey Royal filter and for the past week and a half, it worked like a charm. All you need to do is plan ahead and fill the top up at night and there will be plenty of water for drinking and cooking the following day. I will say that out of the box the two filters need to primed which involves pouring water through them in reverse and therefore should be done with clean water, not lake water. Burkey makes a priming attachment for this which you may want to consider. Other than that, these things are great.

    Remember each male should be drinking 3 liters a day and 2.2 liters for females. Make sure there is at least that much available. We tend to drink a bit more when it's hotter and a little less in winter.

    Drip filters are ok if you have the time to fill it and only a couple of people but on demand pump filters are great for more people or when you need water now.
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